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Design for detecting recycling muon after muon-catalyzed fusion reaction in solid hydrogen isotope target

Okutsu, Kenichi*; Yamashita, Takuma*; Kino, Yasushi*; Nakashima, Ryota*; Miyashita, Konan*; Yasuda, Kazuhiro*; Okada, Shinji*; Sato, Motoyasu*; Oka, Toshitaka  ; Kawamura, Naritoshi*; Kanda, Sotaro*; Shimomura, Koichiro*; Strasser, P.*; Takeshita, Soshi*; Tampo, Motonobu*; Doiuchi, Shogo*; Nagatani, Yukinori*; Natori, Hiroaki*; Nishimura, Shoichiro*; Pant, A. D.*; Miyake, Yasuhiro*; Ishida, Katsuhiko*

A muonic molecule which consists of two hydrogen isotope nuclei (deuteron (d) or tritium (t)) and a muon decays immediately via nuclear fusion and the muon will be released as a recycling muon, and start to find another hydrogen isotope nucleus. The reaction cycle continues until the muon ends up its lifetime of 2.2 $$mu$$s. Since the muon does not participate in the nuclear reaction, the reaction is so called a muon catalyzed fusion ($$mu$$CF). The recycling muon has a particular kinetic energy (KE) of the muon molecular orbital when the nuclear reaction occurs. Since the KE is based on the unified atom limit where distance between two nuclei is zero. A precise few-body calculation estimating KE distribution (KED) is also in progress, which could be compared with the experimental results. In the present work, we observed recycling muons after $$mu$$CF reaction.

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