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Journal Articles

Visualizing cation vacancies in Ce:Gd$$_{3}$$Al$$_{2}$$Ga$$_{3}$$O$$_{12}$$ scintillators by gamma-ray-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

Fujimori, Kosuke*; Kitaura, Mamoru*; Taira, Yoshitaka*; Fujimoto, Masaki*; Zen, H.*; Watanabe, Shinta*; Kamada, Kei*; Okano, Yasuaki*; Kato, Masahiro*; Hosaka, Masahito*; et al.

Applied Physics Express, 13(8), p.085505_1 - 085505_4, 2020/08

 Times Cited Count:1 Percentile:24.67(Physics, Applied)

To clarify the existence of cation vacancies in Ce-doped Gd$$_{3}$$Al$$_{2}$$Ga$$_{3}$$O$$_{12}$$ (Ce:GAGG) scintillators, we performed gamma-ray-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (GiPALS). GiPAL spectra of GAGG and Ce:GAGG comprised two exponential decay components, which were assigned to positron annihilation at bulk and defect states. By an analogy with Ce:Y$$_{3}$$Al$$_{5}$$O$$_{12}$$, the defect-related component was attributed to Al/Ga-O divacancy complexes. This component was weaker for Ce, Mg:GAGG, which correlated with the suppression of shallow electron traps responsible for phosphorescence. Oxygen vacancies were charge compensators for Al/Ga vacancies. The lifetime of the defect-related component was significantly changed by Mg co-doping. This was understood by considering aggregates of Mg$$^{2+}$$ ions at Al/Ga sites with oxygen vacancies, which resulted in the formation of vacancy clusters.

Journal Articles

Decay properties of $$^{266}$$Bh and $$^{262}$$Db produced in the $$^{248}$$Cm + $$^{23}$$Na reaction

Morita, Kosuke*; Morimoto, Koji*; Kaji, Daiya*; Haba, Hiromitsu*; Ozeki, Kazutaka*; Kudo, Yuki*; Sato, Nozomi*; Sumita, Takayuki*; Yoneda, Akira*; Ichikawa, Takatoshi*; et al.

Journal of the Physical Society of Japan, 78(6), p.064201_1 - 064201_6, 2009/06

 Times Cited Count:27 Percentile:78.3(Physics, Multidisciplinary)

Decay properties of an isotope $$^{266}$$Bh and its daughter nucleus $$^{262}$$Db produced by the $$^{248}$$Cm($$^{23}$$Na,5$$n$$) reaction were studied by using a gas-filled recoil separator coupled with a position-sensitive semiconductor detector. $$^{266}$$Bh was clearly identified from the correlation of the known nuclide, $$^{262}$$Db. The obtained decay properties of $$^{266}$$Bh and $$^{262}$$Db are consistent with those observed in the $$^{278}$$113 chain, which provided further confirmation of the discovery of $$^{278}$$113.

Oral presentation

Production and decay properties of $$^{266}$$Bh and its daughter nuclei

Morimoto, Koji*; Morita, Kosuke*; Kaji, Daiya*; Haba, Hiromitsu*; Ozeki, Kazutaka*; Kudo, Yuki*; Sato, Nozomi; Sumita, Takayuki*; Yoneda, Akira*; Ichikawa, Takatoshi*; et al.

no journal, , 

A nuclide, $$^{266}$$Bh, is the great-grand-daughter of $$^{278}$$113 that is produced in the $$^{209}$$Bi + $$^{70}$$Zn reaction. The identification was based on a genetic link to the known daughter nucleus $$^{262}$$Db by alpha-decays. The main purpose of this work is to provide further confirmation of the production and identification of the isotope $$^{278}$$113. As a present result, a state in $$^{266}$$Bh, which decays by an alpha emission with the energies ranging from 9.05 to 9.23 MeV, feeds a state in $$^{262}$$Db, which decays by alpha emission and by SF with a previously known half-life. The result provided a further confirmation of the production and identification of the isotope of the 113th element, $$^{278}$$113, studied by a research group at RIKEN.

Oral presentation

Production and decay properties of $$^{266}$$Bh and its daughter nuclei

Morimoto, Koji*; Morita, Kosuke*; Kaji, Daiya*; Haba, Hiromitsu*; Ozeki, Kazutaka*; Kudo, Yuki*; Sato, Nozomi; Sumita, Takayuki*; Yoneda, Akira*; Ichikawa, Takatoshi*; et al.

no journal, , 

no abstracts in English

Oral presentation

Confirmations of the synthesis of $$^{278}$$113 produced by the $$^{209}$$Bi($$^{70}$$Zn,n)$$^{278}$$113 reaction

Morimoto, Koji*; Morita, Kosuke*; Kaji, Daiya*; Haba, Hiromitsu*; Ozeki, Kazutaka*; Kudo, Yuki*; Sato, Nozomi; Sumita, Takayuki*; Yoneda, Akira*; Ichikawa, Takatoshi*; et al.

no journal, , 

We performed the experiment to synthesize an isotope of the element 113 produced by a $$^{209}$$Bi($$^{70}$$Zn,n)$$^{278}$$113 reaction using a gas-filled recoil ion separator (GARIS) at RIKEN. Two decay chains were observed, and assigned to those originating from an isotope $$^{278}$$113. Both chains were connected into the previously known decays of $$^{266}$$Bh and $$^{262}$$Db via previously unknown decays of $$^{278}$$113, $$^{274}$$Rg, and $$^{270}$$Mt. Although the $$^{266}$$Bh was known nuclide, a number of atoms reported so far was limited. In order to study more precise decay property of the $$^{266}$$Bh, we performed the direct production of $$^{266}$$Bh by the $$^{248}$$Cm($$^{23}$$Na,5n)$$^{266}$$Bh reaction. In this experiment, the $$^{266}$$Bh was clearly identified from the correlation of the nuclide, $$^{262}$$Db. The obtained decay properties of $$^{266}$$Bh and $$^{262}$$Db are consistent with those observed in the $$^{278}$$113 chain, which provided further confirmation of the discovery of $$^{278}$$113.

Oral presentation

Development of gamma-ray induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

Taira, Yoshitaka*; Fujimoto, Masaki*; Fujimori, Kosuke*; Kitaura, Mamoru*; Zen, H.*; Okano, Yasuaki*; Hosaka, Masahito*; Yamazaki, Junichiro*; Kato, Masahiro*; Hirade, Tetsuya; et al.

no journal, , 

For general positron sources, radioisotopes such as $$^{22}$$Na are often used. However, there is a problem that positrons cannot probe the deep region of metal materials with a thickness of 1 mm or more. Gamma-ray induced positron annihilation lifetime measurement (GiPALS) is a method for generating positrons in bulk samples with a thickness of several centimeters and samples placed in vessels such as high temperature and/or pressure furnaces. The annihilation lifetime of positrons is about 200 ps for metal materials, so it is important to use gamma rays with a shorter pulse width for GiPALS in order to accurately measure the positron lifetime. We have succeeded in the proof-of-principle experiment for GiPALS of ultra-short pulse gamma rays with a pulse width of 2 ps, which was originally developed using 90$$^{circ}$$ collision laser Compton scattering at UVSOR.

Oral presentation

Development of gamma-ray induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy at UVSOR

Taira, Yoshitaka*; Fujimoto, Masaki*; Fujimori, Kosuke*; Kitaura, Mamoru*; Zen, H.*; Okano, Yasuaki*; Hosaka, Masahito*; Yamazaki, Junichiro*; Kato, Masahiro*; Hirade, Tetsuya; et al.

no journal, , 

For general positron sources, radioisotopes such as $$^{22}$$Na are often used. However, there is a problem that positrons cannot probe the deep region of metal materials with a thickness of 1 mm or more. Gamma-ray induced positron annihilation lifetime measurement (GiPALS) is a method for generating positrons in bulk samples with a thickness of several centimeters and samples placed in vessels such as high temperature and/or pressure furnaces. The annihilation lifetime of positrons is about 200 ps for metal materials, so it is important to use gamma rays with a shorter pulse width for GiPALS in order to accurately measure the positron lifetime. We have succeeded in the proof-of-principle experiment for GiPALS of ultra-short pulse gamma rays with a pulse width of 2 ps, which was originally developed using 90$$^{circ}$$ collision laser Compton scattering at UVSOR.

Oral presentation

Vacancy-type defects in garnet crystals revealed by gamma-ray-induced positron annihilation spectroscopy

Kitaura, Mamoru*; Fujimori, Kosuke*; Taira, Yoshitaka*; Fujimoto, Masaki*; Zen, H.*; Hirade, Tetsuya; Kamada, Kei*; Watanabe, Shinta*; Onishi, Akimasa*

no journal, , 

Positron annihilation spectroscopy is the only way to investigate the properties of cation vacancies because they are negatively charged. We generated high-energy pulsed gamma rays by the vertical collision of an ultrashort pulse laser and electron beam. In this study, we investigated the vacancy-type defects present in the crystals of GAGG(Gd$$_{3}$$Al$$_{2}$$Ga$$_{3}$$O$$_{12}$$), GAGG: Ce and GAGG: Ce, Mg by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using the high-energy gamma rays. The lifetime of the defect-related component was significantly changed by Mg co-doping. This was understood by considering aggregates of Mg$$^{2+}$$ ions at Al/Ga sites with oxygen vacancies, which resulted in the formation of vacancy clusters.

Oral presentation

Origin of phosphorescence in Ce:Gd$$_{3}$$Al$$_{2}$$Ga$$_{3}$$O$$_{12}$$ crystals revealed by gamma-ray induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

Fujimori, Kosuke*; Kitaura, Mamoru*; Taira, Yoshitaka*; Fujimoto, Masaki*; Zen, H.*; Hirade, Tetsuya; Kamada, Kei*; Watanabe, Shinta*; Onishi, Akimasa*

no journal, , 

We generated high-energy pulsed gamma rays by the vertical collision of an ultrashort pulse laser and electron beam. In this study, we investigated the vacancy-type defects present in the crystals of GAGG(Gd$$_{3}$$Al$$_{2}$$Ga$$_{3}$$O$$_{12}$$), GAGG: Ce and GAGG: Ce, Mg by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy using the high-energy gamma rays. The lifetime of the defect-related component was significantly changed by Mg co-doping. This indicates that the Al/Ga vacancies disappear. This fact corresponds well with the suppression of the phosphorescence component and is an important result showing that the Mg co-doping is effective in suppressing the shallow electron capture center.

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