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Journal Articles

Quantum beam technology; Nanostructured proton-conductive membranes prepared by swift heavy ion irradiation for fuel cell applications

Yamaki, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Misaki*; Asano, Masaharu; Nomura, Kumiko*; Takagi, Shigeharu*; Maekawa, Yasunari; Yoshida, Masaru*

Proceedings of Sadoway 60 Symposium, p.114 - 120, 2010/06

My presentation deals with the application of high-energy heavy ion beams from the cyclotron accelerator of Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application (TIARA), JAEA. Our strategic focus is centered on using nano-scale controllability of the ion-beam processing; the membrane preparation involves (1) the irradiation of commercially-available base polymer films with hundreds of MeV ions, (2) graft polymerization of vinyl monomers into electronically-excited parts along the ion trajectory, called latent tracks, and (3) sulfonation of the graft polymers. Interestingly, the resulting membranes exhibited anisotropic proton transport, i.e., higher conductivity in the thickness direction. According to microscopic observations, this is probably because the columnar electrolyte phase extended, with a width of tens-to-hundreds nanometers, through the membrane.

Journal Articles

Tritium engineering research and development for fusion reactor at the tritium process laboratory of JAERI

Nishi, Masataka; Hayashi, Takumi; Shu, Wataru; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Kawamura, Yoshinori; Yamada, Masayuki; Suzuki, Takumi; Iwai, Yasunori; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Isobe, Kanetsugu; et al.

Materialovedenie (Russian Science of Materials) No.2, p.42 - 45, 2002/00

no abstracts in English

Oral presentation

Development of polymer electrolyte membranes by ion-beam irradiation technique for fuel cell applications

Yamaki, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Misaki*; Asano, Masaharu; Yoshida, Masaru; Nomura, Kumiko*; Takagi, Shigeharu*; Maekawa, Yasunari

no journal, , 

Fluoropolymer films were bombarded with swift heavy ions to produce an activated zone along the incident axis. The chemically active species generated in this so-called ion track were used to initiate the grafting of styrene, and the subsequent sulfonation of the graft chains provided the electrolyte membranes with anisotropic proton conductivity in the thickness direction. These membranes were found to have sufficient mechanical strength as well as highly conductive pathways with a cylindroidal shape of tens-to-hundreds nanometer size.

Oral presentation

Development of nanostructure-controlled fuel-cell membranes by ion irradiation technique

Kobayashi, Misaki*; Yamaki, Tetsuya; Nomura, Kumiko*; Takagi, Shigeharu*; Asano, Masaharu; Yoshida, Masaru; Maekawa, Yasunari

no journal, , 

To realize mass commercialization of fuel cell, many kinds of properties, such as high proton conductivity, low water swelling and high mechanical strength, are required for a polymer electrolyte membrane. Utilizing nano-scale controllability of an ion beam is our strategic way for the preparation of fuel-cell electrolyte membranes. The preparation of membranes involve (1) the irradiation of heavy ions with different masses and energies; (2) the grafting of styrene into electronically-excited region along the ion trajectory called the latent track; (3) sulfonation of the graft chains. According to the FE-SEM and TEM observations, the proton conductive electrolyte part appeared to extend through the membrane thickness with dimensions of tens-to-hundreds nanometers, which agreed with the calculated latent track diameter. Correlations between membrane properties, such as proton conductivity and nanostructure were investigated.

Oral presentation

Development of nano-structure controlled polymer electrolyte fuel-cell membranes by high-energy heavy ion irradiation

Yamaki, Tetsuya; Asano, Masaharu; Kobayashi, Misaki*; Nomura, Kumiko*; Takagi, Shigeharu*; Maekawa, Yasunari; Yoshida, Masaru

no journal, , 

In order to develop proton-conductive membranes for PEFCs, we have been using high-energy heavy ion beams from the cyclotron accelerator of TIARA. Our strategic focus is centered on using nano-scale controllability of the ion-beam processing; the membrane preparation involves (1) the irradiation of commercially-available base polymer films with MeV ions, (2) graft polymerization of vinyl monomers into electronically-excited parts along the ion trajectory, called latent tracks, and (3) sulfonation of the graft polymers. Interestingly, the resulting membranes exhibited anisotropic proton transport, i.e., higher conductivity in the thickness direction. According to microscopic observations, this is probably because the columnar electrolyte phase extended, with a width of tens-to-hundreds nanometers, through the membrane. Other excellent membrane properties, e.g., sufficient mechanical strength, high dimensional stability, and low gas permeability should be due to such a controlled structure.

Oral presentation

Development of fuel-cell polymer electrolyte membranes by ion track technology

Yamaki, Tetsuya; Asano, Masaharu; Kobayashi, Misaki*; Nomura, Kumiko*; Takagi, Shigeharu*; Maekawa, Yasunari; Yoshida, Masaru

no journal, , 

We have been using high-energy heavy ion beams from the cyclotron accelerator of Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application (TIARA), JAEA to develop proton-conductive membranes for PEFCs. Our strategic focus is centered on using nano-scale controllability of the ion-beam processing; the membrane preparation involves (1) the irradiation of commercially-available base polymer films with MeV ions, (2) graft polymerization of vinyl monomers into electronically-excited parts along the ion trajectory, called latent tracks, and (3) sulfonation of the graft polymers. Interestingly, the resulting membranes exhibited anisotropic proton transport, i.e., higher conductivity in the thickness direction. According to microscopic observations, this is probably because the columnar electrolyte phase extended, with a width of tens-to-hundreds nanometers, through the membrane. Other excellent membrane properties, e.g., sufficient mechanical strength, high dimensional stability, and low gas permeability should be due to such a controlled structure.

Oral presentation

Development of nano-structure controlled polymer electrolyte fuel-cell membranes by high-energy heavy ion irradiation

Yamaki, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Misaki*; Asano, Masaharu; Nomura, Kumiko*; Takagi, Shigeharu*; Maekawa, Yasunari; Yoshida, Masaru*

no journal, , 

Our presentation deals with the application of high-energy heavy ion beams to the preparation of nano-structure controlled electrolyte membranes. The membrane preparation involves (1) irradiation of commercially-available base polymer films with 100 MeV $$^{16}$$O, 400 MeV $$^{56}$$Fe, or 450 MeV $$^{129}$$Xe, (2) graft polymerization of vinyl monomers into latent tracks, and (3) sulfonation of the graft polymers. The resulting membranes exhibited anisotropic proton transport, i.e., higher conductivity in the through-plane direction. According to microscopic observations, this is probably because the nearly columnar electrolyte phase with a width of tens-to-hundreds nanometers extended through the membrane. Interestingly, our ion irradiation technique would be able to control the nano-structure of proton-conducting pathways in the membranes. Other excellent membrane properties should also be due to such a controlled structure.

Oral presentation

Development of nano-structure controlled polymer electrolyte fuel-cell membranes by high-energy heavy-ion irradiation; Study of their proton conductivity

Yamaki, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Misaki*; Asano, Masaharu; Nomura, Kumiko*; Takagi, Shigeharu*; Maekawa, Yasunari; Yoshida, Masaru*

no journal, , 

This study deals with the application of high-energy heavy ion beams from the cyclotron accelerator of Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application (TIARA), JAEA. Our strategic focus is centered on using nano-scale controllability of the ion-beam processing; the membrane preparation involves (1) the irradiation of commercially-available base polymer films with hundreds of MeV ions, (2) graft polymerization of vinyl monomers into electronically-excited parts along the ion trajectory, called latent tracks, and (3) sulfonation of the graft polymers. The resulting membranes exhibited anisotropic proton transport, i.e., higher conductivity in the thickness direction. The through-plane proton conductivity, which is a more direct measurement of the membrane's conductivity and is of interest in an operating fuel cell, was comparable to that of a Nafion112 membrane at the same ion exchange capacity level.

Oral presentation

The Dose-reduction activity of the lens of the eye at Tokai Reprocessing Plant

Nishino, Saki; Nemoto, Ryo*; Hayashi, Hiroyuki*; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Isomae, Hidemi; Sakuma, Shuhei; Takimoto, Misaki; Okuyama, Shun; Unno, Motoyoshi; Kitao, Takahiko

no journal, , 

At the JAEA Tokai Reprocessing facility, especially workers engaged in Plutonium Conversion Development Facility (PCDF) are required strict radiation control due to working environment handling various nuclear material including plutonium (Pu) at short range. Because the equivalent dose limit of the lens of the eye stipulated by Japanese regulations has been revised downwards, we reassessed personal dose equivalent focusing on the lens of the worker's eye. The reassessment results indicate that wearing the appropriate radiation protection glasses is necessary for some workers who handle Pu including waste material in PCDF. Radiation management using protective glasses has started under revised radiation control plan.

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