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Journal Articles

Evaluation of sediment and $$^{137}$$Cs redistribution in the Oginosawa River catchment near the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant using integrated watershed modeling

Sakuma, Kazuyuki; Malins, A.; Funaki, Hironori; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Niizato, Tadafumi; Nakanishi, Takahiro; Mori, Koji*; Tada, Kazuhiro*; Kobayashi, Takamaru*; Kitamura, Akihiro; et al.

Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 182, p.44 - 51, 2018/02

 Times Cited Count:7 Percentile:42.65(Environmental Sciences)

The Oginosawa River catchment lies 15 km south-west of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant. The General-purpose Terrestrial Fluid-flow Simulator (GETFLOWS) code was used to study sediment and $$^{137}$$Cs redistribution within the catchment. Cesium-137 input to watercourses came predominantly from land adjacent to river channels and forest gullies. Forested areas far from the channels only made a minor contribution to $$^{137}$$Cs input to watercourses, total erosion of between 0.001-0.1 mm from May 2011 to December 2015. The 2.3-6.9% y$$^{-1}$$ decrease in the amount of $$^{137}$$Cs in forest topsoil over the study period can be explained by radioactive decay (approximately 2.3% y$$^{-1}$$), along with a migration downwards into subsoil and a small amount of export. The amount of $$^{137}$$Cs available for release from land adjacent to rivers is expected to be lower in future than compared to this study period, as the simulations indicate a high depletion of inventory from these areas.

Journal Articles

Characteristics of radio-cesium transport and discharge between different basins near to the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant after heavy rainfall events

Sakuma, Kazuyuki; Kitamura, Akihiro; Malins, A.; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Machida, Masahiko; Mori, Koji*; Tada, Kazuhiro*; Kobayashi, Takamaru*; Tawara, Yasuhiro*; Tosaka, Hiroyuki*

Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 169-170, p.137 - 150, 2017/04

 Times Cited Count:18 Percentile:69.64(Environmental Sciences)

This paper describes watershed modeling of catchments surrounding the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant to understand radio-cesium redistribution by water flows and sediment transport. We extended our previously developed three-dimensional hydrogeological model of the catchments to calculate the migration of radio-cesium in both sediment-sorbed and dissolved forms. The simulations cover the entirety of 2013, including nine heavy rainfall events, as well as Typhoon Roke in September 2011. Typhoons Man-yi and Wipha were the strongest typhoons in 2013 and had the largest bearing on radio-cesium redistribution. The simulated $$^{137}$$Cs discharge quantities over the nine events in 2013 are in good agreement with field monitoring observations. Deposition mainly occurs on flood plains and points where the river beds broaden in the lower basins, and within dam reservoirs along the rivers. Differences in $$^{137}$$Cs discharge ratios between the five basins are explained by differences in the initial fallout distribution within the basins, the presence of dam reservoirs, and the input supply to watercourses. It is possible to use these simulation results to evaluate future radioactive material distributions in order to support remediation planning.

Journal Articles

Redistribution and export of contaminated sediment within eastern Fukushima Prefecture due to typhoon flooding

Kitamura, Akihiro; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Sakuma, Kazuyuki; Malins, A.; Okumura, Masahiko; Machida, Masahiko; Mori, Koji*; Tada, Kazuhiro*; Tawara, Yasuhiro*; Kobayashi, Takamaru*; et al.

Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 41(12), p.1708 - 1726, 2016/09

 Times Cited Count:14 Percentile:62.25(Geography, Physical)

Sediment erosion and transport processes that are considered to be important in predicting the future radioactive material distribution through sediment-sorbed form in Fukushima Prefecture are simulated. Since large portion of the sediment is considered to be supplied into the rivers, it is important to trace their migration process in terms of each river basin. We choose five river basins, namely the Odaka, the Ukedo, the Maeda, the Kuma, and the Tomioka, from north to south, because of their importance in contamination aspects and prediction studies. The results are summarized as comprehensive dataset of sediment migration for particular river basins in typical typhoon events that account for the most of annual soil erosion. Detail calculations implemented for the amount of sediment supplied in to the river, deposited on river and dam beds, and exported to the ocean.

Oral presentation

Long-term assessment of transport of radioactive contaminant in the environment of Fukushima (F-TRACE Project), 13; Numerical analysis of water, sediment and radioactive cesium transport during rainfall events in a catchment scale

Kurikami, Hiroshi; Malins, A.; Kitamura, Akihiro; Mori, Koji*; Tada, Kazuhiro*; Kobayashi, Takamaru*

no journal, , 

We added models of erosion, transport and deposition of sediment due to surface flow and corresponding radioactive cesium transport into GETFLOWS, GEneral purpose Terrestrial fluid-FLOW Simulator. The application of the model showed results in good agreement with the monitored turbidity and radioactive cesium concentrations in rivers.

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