Refine your search:     
Report No.
 - 
Search Results: Records 1-20 displayed on this page of 466

Presentation/Publication Type

Initialising ...

Refine

Journal/Book Title

Initialising ...

Meeting title

Initialising ...

First Author

Initialising ...

Keyword

Initialising ...

Language

Initialising ...

Publication Year

Initialising ...

Held year of conference

Initialising ...

Save select records

Journal Articles

Temperature dependence of positron annihilation lifetime in near-surface and bulk of room-temperature ionic liquid observed by a slow positron beam

Hirade, Tetsuya; Michishio, Koji*; Kobayashi, Yoshinori*; Oshima, Nagayasu*

Chemical Physics Letters, 795, p.139507_1 - 139507_4, 2022/05

We obtained the temperature dependence up to 150$$^{circ}$$C of the triplet positronium ($$ortho$$-Ps) lifetime in N,N,N-Trimethyl-N-propylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (TMPA-TFSI) by the vertical slow positron beamline installed at AIST. Positrons penetrate into the liquid surface of TMPA-TFSI with the positron energies of 2 keV and 12 keV to investigate at the near-surface and the balk. The surface structure was visible at 150$$^{circ}$$C, 120$$^{circ}$$C above the melting temperature. The $$ortho$$-Ps lifetime became shorter at higher temperatures for both positron energies. Similar temperature dependence had appeared just in water as the result of the reaction of $$ortho$$-Ps and radiolysis products such as the OH radicals. The temperature dependence observed for TMPA-TFSI suggested that the chemical reaction of $$ortho$$-Ps occurred.

Journal Articles

Upgrade history and present status of the general control system for the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility at J-PARC

Sakai, Kenji; Oi, Motoki; Haga, Katsuhiro; Kai, Tetsuya; Nakatani, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Yasuo*; Watanabe, Akihiko*

JPS Conference Proceedings (Internet), 33, p.011151_1 - 011151_6, 2021/03

For safely and efficiently operating a spallation neutron source and a muon target, a general control system (GCS) operates within Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF), GCS administers operation processes and interlocks of many instruments for various operation statuses. It consists of several subsystems such as an integral control system (ICS), interlock systems (ILS), shared servers, network system, and timing distribution system (TDS). Although GCS is an independent system that controls the target stations, it works closely with the control systems of other facilities in J-PARC. Since the first beam injection in 2008, GCS has operated stably without any serious troubles after modification based on commissioning for operation and control. Then, significant improvements in GCS such as upgrade of ICS by changing its framework software and function enhancement of ILS were proceeded until 2015, in considering sustainable long-term operation and maintenance. In recent years, many instruments in GCS have replaced due to end of production and support of them. In this way, many modifications have been proceeded in the entire GCS after start of beam operation. Under these situation, it is important to comprehend upgrade history and present status of GCS in order to decide its upgrade plan for the coming ten years. This report will mention upgrade history, present status and future agenda of GCS.

Journal Articles

Visualizing cation vacancies in Ce:Gd$$_{3}$$Al$$_{2}$$Ga$$_{3}$$O$$_{12}$$ scintillators by gamma-ray-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

Fujimori, Kosuke*; Kitaura, Mamoru*; Taira, Yoshitaka*; Fujimoto, Masaki*; Zen, H.*; Watanabe, Shinta*; Kamada, Kei*; Okano, Yasuaki*; Kato, Masahiro*; Hosaka, Masahito*; et al.

Applied Physics Express, 13(8), p.085505_1 - 085505_4, 2020/08

 Times Cited Count:1 Percentile:24.67(Physics, Applied)

To clarify the existence of cation vacancies in Ce-doped Gd$$_{3}$$Al$$_{2}$$Ga$$_{3}$$O$$_{12}$$ (Ce:GAGG) scintillators, we performed gamma-ray-induced positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (GiPALS). GiPAL spectra of GAGG and Ce:GAGG comprised two exponential decay components, which were assigned to positron annihilation at bulk and defect states. By an analogy with Ce:Y$$_{3}$$Al$$_{5}$$O$$_{12}$$, the defect-related component was attributed to Al/Ga-O divacancy complexes. This component was weaker for Ce, Mg:GAGG, which correlated with the suppression of shallow electron traps responsible for phosphorescence. Oxygen vacancies were charge compensators for Al/Ga vacancies. The lifetime of the defect-related component was significantly changed by Mg co-doping. This was understood by considering aggregates of Mg$$^{2+}$$ ions at Al/Ga sites with oxygen vacancies, which resulted in the formation of vacancy clusters.

Journal Articles

Temperature dependence of ortho-positronium annihilation in room temperature ionic liquids

Hirade, Tetsuya; Michishio, Koji*; Kobayashi, Yoshinori*; Oshima, Nagayasu*

Acta Physica Polonica A, 137(2), p.109 - 112, 2020/02

 Times Cited Count:0 Percentile:0(Physics, Multidisciplinary)

Recently, it was reported that the positronium (Ps) bubble in Room Temperature Ionic Liquids (RTILs) showed some phenomena that were very different from them observed in other molecular liquids. Now the reason of these interesting phenomena is being understood. The structure caused by the ionic interaction between anions and cations can exist even at the higher temperatures than the melting temperatures. It was the reason why the oscillation of Ps bubble was observed at the temperatures near the melting temperatures in RTILs. The temperature dependence of the Ps bubble size estimated by the triplet Ps ($$ortho$$-Ps) pick-off annihilation lifetime indicated that there was a nano-meter structure remained by ionic interactions even at high temperatures. The $$ortho$$-Ps pick-off annihilation lifetime will be a strong tool to study nano-structure in RTILs.

JAEA Reports

Progress of general control system for Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility at J-PARC

Sakai, Kenji; Oi, Motoki; Takada, Hiroshi; Kai, Tetsuya; Nakatani, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Yasuo*; Watanabe, Akihiko*

JAEA-Technology 2018-011, 57 Pages, 2019/01

JAEA-Technology-2018-011.pdf:4.98MB

For safely and efficiently operating a spallation neutron source and a muon target, a general control system (GCS) operates within Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF). GCS administers operation processes and interlocks of many instruments. It consists of several subsystems such as an integral control system (ICS), interlock systems (ILS), shared servers, network system, and timing distribution system (TDS). Although GCS is an independent system that controls the target stations, it works closely with the control systems of the accelerators and other facilities in J-PARC. Since the first beam injection, GCS has operated stably without any serious troubles after modification based on commissioning for operation and control. Then, significant improvements in GCS such as upgrade of ICS by changing its framework software and function enhancement of ILS were proceeded until 2015. In this way, many modifications have been proceeded in the entire GCS during a period of approximately ten years after start of beam operation. Under these situation, it is important to comprehend upgrade history and present status of GCS in order to decide its upgrade plan. This report summarizes outline, structure, roles and functions of GCS in 2017.

JAEA Reports

Applicability confirmation test of optimum decay heat evaluation method for HTGR with HTTR (Non-nuclear heating test); Validation of residual heat evaluation model

Honda, Yuki; Inaba, Yoshitomo; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Yamazaki, Kazunori; Kobayashi, Shoichi; Aono, Tetsuya; Shibata, Taiju; Ishitsuka, Etsuo

JAEA-Technology 2017-013, 20 Pages, 2017/06

JAEA-Technology-2017-013.pdf:2.52MB

Decay heat is one of an important factor for a safety evaluation of depressurized loss-of-forced cooling accident, a representative high consequence accident, in high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). Traditionally, a conservative decay heat curve is used for safety analysis according to the regulatory standards. On the other hand, there is growing interest in obtaining test data related to decay heat for the use of uncertainty analysis. However, such data has not been obtained for prismatic-type HTGR. Therefore, we have launched a test program to obtain the decay heat data from the HTTR. As an initial step, an applicability confirmation test of decay heat evaluation method for HTGR was conducted in February 2017 without non-nuclear heating condition. This report introduces an estimation method for the decay heat based on test data using HTTR and shows the results of validation of the reactor residual heat evaluation method which will be used to obtain the decay heat data based on test data.

Journal Articles

Positron annihilation in the near surface of room temperature ionic liquids

Hirade, Tetsuya; O'Rourke, B. E.*; Kobayashi, Yoshinori*

Journal of Physics; Conference Series, 791(1), p.012029_1 - 012029_4, 2017/02

 Times Cited Count:1 Percentile:49.45

We tried to observe the positron annihilation rates near surface of (room temperature ionic liquids) IL's, such as N,N,N-trimethyl-N-propylammonium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (TMPA-TFSI) by use of the perpendicular slow positron beamline installed at AIST. The vaper pressure of TMPA-TFSI is very small and hence it is possible to measure the positron annihilation rate in vacuum chamber directly. This represents the first energy variable experimental results of the positron annihilation rate at the near surface of an IL. The triplet positronium annihilation rate seems to be larger at nearer region to the surface of the IL's.

Journal Articles

The Role of nitric oxide in radiation-induced bystander cell-killing effect

Yokota, Yuichiro; Funayama, Tomoo; Ikeda, Hiroko; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Michiyo; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

JAEA-Review 2015-022, JAEA Takasaki Annual Report 2014, P. 67, 2016/02

The role of nitric oxide (NO) in bystander effect was investigated. Human fibroblasts were irradiated with $$gamma$$-rays (LET: 0.2 keV/$$mu$$m) or carbon-ion beam (108 keV/$$mu$$m), and then, co-cultured with the non-irradiated cells. After 24 h culture, the survival rates of non-irradiated cells and the concentrations of nitrate, an oxide of NO, in the medium were measured. The survival rates of non-irradiated cells decreased in dose-dependent and radiation quality-independent manners. Negative relationships between survival rates and nitrite concentrations existed, indicating the amounts of produced NO are an important determinant of bystander effects. Next, a reagent producing two molecules of NO in a half-life of 100 min was added in the culture medium. After incubation of 24 h the survival rates of treated cells did not decrease, suggesting NO produced intracellularly has an important role to lead the bystander effect but is not the signal molecule for intercellular communication.

Journal Articles

Reconsideration of the period of volcanic activity of Kuroshima Island, and summary of K-Ar age of the volcanic rocks of Nansei shoto off Kyushu

Fukuda, Tetsuya*; Tanase, Atsushi*; Umeda, Koji; Kobayashi, Tetsuo*

Gekkan Chikyu, 37(5), p.197 - 203, 2015/05

no abstracts in English

Journal Articles

Responses of the salt chemotaxis learning in ${it C. elegans}$ mutants to microbeam irradiation

Sakashita, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Michiyo; Hattori, Yuya; Ikeda, Hiroko; Muto, Yasuko*; Yokota, Yuichiro; Funayama, Tomoo; Hamada, Nobuyuki*; Shirai, Kana*; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

JAEA-Review 2014-050, JAEA Takasaki Annual Report 2013, P. 74, 2015/03

An increasing body of data indicates that ionizing radiation affects the nervous system and alters its function. Recently, we reported that chemotaxis of ${it C. elegans}$ during the salt chemotaxis learning (SCL), that is conditioned taste aversion to NaCl, was modulated by carbon ion irradiation, i.e. accelerated decrease in chemotaxis to NaCl during the SCL. However, we had no direct evidence for the interaction of ionizing radiation with the central neuronal tissue (nerve ring) in ${it C. elegans}$. Microbeam irradiation is useful to analyze direct radiation effects at a cellular or tissue level. Thus, we applied the microbeam irradiation of the ${it C. elegans}$ nerve ring and examined the effect on the SCL.

Journal Articles

Effect of ionizing radiation upon dehydrated Pv11 cultured cells originated from the sleeping chironomid

Watanabe, Kazuyo*; Akitsuki, Takashi*; Shimura, Sachiko*; Gusev, O.*; Cornette, R.*; Kikawada, Takahiro*; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Funayama, Tomoo; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Okuda, Takashi*

JAEA-Review 2014-050, JAEA Takasaki Annual Report 2013, P. 87, 2015/03

The Sleeping Chironomid, ${it Polypedilum vanderplanki}$ can stand complete desiccation (anhydrobiosis) and also shows radio-resistance. Recently, we have generated cultured cell (Pv11) originated from ${it P. vanderplanki}$ embryo which can also stand complete dehydration. In this study, we examine the tolerance of cultured cell Pv11 against ionbeam irradiation.

Journal Articles

Effects of carbon-ion microbeam irradiation on locomotion and pharyngeal pumping motion in $textit{C. elegans}$

Suzuki, Michiyo; Hattori, Yuya; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Funayama, Tomoo; Yokota, Yuichiro; Ikeda, Hiroko; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

JAEA-Review 2014-050, JAEA Takasaki Annual Report 2013, P. 88, 2015/03

Journal Articles

Bystander effect mediated by nitric oxide depends on irradiation dose but not on radiation quality

Yokota, Yuichiro; Funayama, Tomoo; Ikeda, Hiroko; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Michiyo; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

JAEA-Review 2014-050, JAEA Takasaki Annual Report 2013, P. 75, 2015/03

We investigated the bystander effect induced by $$gamma$$-rays or carbon ions and analyzed the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the effect. Normal human fibroblasts were used. Cells inoculated on a porous membrane were irradiated with varying doses of $$gamma$$-rays or carbon ions. Irradiated cells were then non-contact co-cultured with non-irradiated cells for 24 h. After co-culture, the survival rates of non-irradiated bystander cells co-cultured with irradiated cells decreased with increasing dose and bottomed out at 0.5 Gy or higher doses. This indicates that the bystander effect is dependent on irradiation dose but independent of radiation quality. Next, a specific NO scavenger c-PTIO was added to the culture medium during irradiation and co-culture. This treatment prevented the reduction in survival rates of bystander cells, clearly indicating that NO has an important role in the bystander effect.

Journal Articles

Target irradiation of individual cells using focusing heavy-ion microbeam of JAEA-Takasaki, 5; Irradiation of individual cells with scanned heavy-ion microbeam

Funayama, Tomoo; Yokota, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Michiyo; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

JAEA-Review 2014-050, JAEA Takasaki Annual Report 2013, P. 73, 2015/03

Using a collimating heavy-ion microbeam system, we have explored various effects of heavy-ion hit on biological materials. However, there are limitations of the collimating system in the size of the microbeam spot and in the irradiation speed that cannot be overcome in principle. Thus, we started the development of a focusing microbeam system for target-irradiating individual cells more precisely. In this year, we established the protocol for irradiating "actual" cell sample with scanned beam. In the experiment, the HeLa cells were inoculated on a CR-39 film, then place on the sample stage. The microscopic image of cells was analyzed, and the cells were irradiated with scanned neon microbeam. After irradiation, we found the correspondence of the distribution pattern of the ion hit positions and the $$gamma$$-H2AX foci on cell nuclei, indicating rapid and accurate irradiation of individual cells with the focusing heavy-ion microbeam.

Journal Articles

Mechanisms for the induction of radioadaptive response by radiation-induced bystander response

Matsumoto, Hideki*; Tomita, Masanori*; Otsuka, Kensuke*; Hatashita, Masanori*; Maeda, Munetoshi*; Funayama, Tomoo; Yokota, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Michiyo; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Ikeda, Hiroko; et al.

JAEA-Review 2014-050, JAEA Takasaki Annual Report 2013, P. 76, 2015/03

The objective of this project is to elucidate molecular mechanisms for the induction of radioadaptive response through radiation-induced bystander responses induced by irradiation with heavy ion microbeams in JAEA. We found that the adaptive response was induced by Ar (520 MeV $$^{40}$$Ar$$^{14+}$$) microbeam-irradiation of a limited number of cells, followed by the broad beam-irradiation and that the adaptive response was almost completely suppressed by the addition of carboxy-PTIO, as a nitric oxide (NO) scavenger. In addition, we found several genes induced specifically and preferentially when radioadaptive response could be induced. We confirmed that ${it iNOS}$ expression was specifically induced only when radioadaptive response could be induced. Our findings strongly suggested that radioadaptive response can be induced by NO-mediated bystander responses evoked by irradiation with heavy ion microbeams.

Journal Articles

Analysis of bystander response in 3D cultured tissue induced by heavy-ion microbeam irradiation

Tomita, Masanori*; Matsumoto, Hideki*; Otsuka, Kensuke*; Funayama, Tomoo; Yokota, Yuichiro; Suzuki, Michiyo; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

JAEA-Review 2014-050, JAEA Takasaki Annual Report 2013, P. 77, 2015/03

Radiation-induced bystander responses are defined as responses in cells that have not been directly targeted by radiation but are in the neighborhood of cells that have been directly exposed. In this study, we aim to clarify a role of bystander response to sustain the homeostasis of damaged tissue using heavy-ion microbeams. We established the heavy-ion microbeam irradiation method to a 3D cultured human epidermis. Using this method, a viable cell rate of the 3D cultured human epidermis irradiated with 260 MeV $$^{20}$$Ne-ion microbeams or broadbeams was analyzed by the MTT method.

Journal Articles

Analysis of bystander effect induced by cell membrane response in glioma cells

Wada, Seiichi*; Ando, Tatsuhiko*; Watanabe, Aya*; Kakizaki, Takehiko*; Natsuhori, Masahiro*; Funayama, Tomoo; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Yokota, Yuichiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

JAEA-Review 2014-050, JAEA Takasaki Annual Report 2013, P. 79, 2015/03

So far, we clarified that X-ray irradiation induced cell killing by bystander effect mediated-secreted factor. This phenomenon was related with sphingomyelinase (SMase). In this study we analyzed mechanism of secreted SMase from irradiated cells after irradiation. SMase was detected in the culture medium after irradiation by SDS-PAGE. Then, SMase was detected in the exosome of culture medium, but not out of exosome after irradiation. This result indicates that SMase was secreted as exosome from the irradiated cells.

Journal Articles

Effect of heavy ion irradiation to the silkworm eggs at before fertilization and at nuclear cleavage stage

Ueda, Daisuke*; Shirai, Koji*; Funayama, Tomoo; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Yokota, Yuichiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

JAEA-Review 2014-050, JAEA Takasaki Annual Report 2013, P. 84, 2015/03

In this study, we investigated the effects of irradiation to the silkworm eggs at various developmental stages. First, we tried the irradiation to the unfertilized eggs (at 1.5 hour after oviposition). At this stage, the female pronucleus and the sperm nucleus are observed in the eggs, but not fertilized. After irradiation, the irradiated eggs stopped the development after fertilization. About 2 hours after, the egg restarted the nuclear cleavage. This result indicates the DNA damage on pronuleus cannot prevent the fertilization. We also investigated the effects of irradiation to the egg at the nuclear cleavage stage (at 6 hour after oviposition). The egg also stopped the development after irradiation, but the duration time of the developmental arrest was almost two times longer (about 4 hours) than that of the egg irradiated at fertilization.

JAEA Reports

Development of microbeam formation and single-ion hit technologies at the TIARA cyclotron

Yokota, Wataru; Sato, Takahiro; Kamiya, Tomihiro; Okumura, Susumu; Kurashima, Satoshi; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Yoshida, Kenichi; Funayama, Tomoo; Sakashita, Tetsuya; et al.

JAEA-Technology 2014-018, 103 Pages, 2014/09

JAEA-Technology-2014-018.pdf:123.66MB

The world's first microbeam focusing technology for heavy ions of hundreds MeV accelerated by a cyclotron has been developed at the TIARA facility in the Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency. The technology enables us to form a microbeam of less than 1 $$mu$$m in diameter and to shoot a specified point on a target by one ion (single-ion hit) with spatial accuracy of microbeam size. In the course of the development, a cyclotron technology to accelerate a small energy-spread beam of hundres MeV, which is necessary for focusing to 1 $$mu$$m, has been developed as well as a beam focusing apparatus, beam size measurement and so forth based on the several-MeV microbeam/single-ion hit system of the TIARA electrostatic accelerators. Applicability of the technologies was examined by actual use in irradiation experiment and the result were fed back to them. This paper reports the process and the results of the development over ten years.

Journal Articles

Observation of a $$p$$-wave one-neutron halo configuration on $$^{37}$$Mg

Kobayashi, Nobuyuki*; Nakamura, Takashi*; Kondo, Yosuke*; Tostevin, J. A.*; Utsuno, Yutaka; Aoi, Nori*; Baba, Hidetada*; Barthelemy, R.*; Famiano, M. A.*; Fukuda, Naoki*; et al.

Physical Review Letters, 112(24), p.242501_1 - 242501_5, 2014/06

 Times Cited Count:70 Percentile:94.21(Physics, Multidisciplinary)

no abstracts in English

466 (Records 1-20 displayed on this page)