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Journal Articles

Iron distributions in the water column of the Japan Basin and Yamato Basin (Japan Sea)

Fujita, Satoshi*; Kuma, Kenshi*; Ishikawa, Satoko*; Nishimura, Shotaro*; Nakayama, Yuta*; Ushizaka, Satomi*; Isoda, Yutaka*; Otosaka, Shigeyoshi; Aramaki, Takafumi*

Journal of Geophysical Research, 115(C12), p.C12001_1 - C12001_12, 2010/12

 Times Cited Count:14 Percentile:39.46(Oceanography)

Vertical distributions of dissolved iron (D-Fe, less than 0.22 micrometer fraction), total iron (T-Fe, unfiltered), and chemical and biological components (e.g., nutrients) in seawater were determined at seven stations in the Japan Sea to understand the mechanisms that control iron behavior. Distributions of the D-Fe were characterized by surface depletion, mid-depth maxima, then slight decrease with depth in deep water and uniform concentration in bottom water because of biological uptake in the surface water and release from microbial decomposition of sinking organic matter in mid-depth water. The T-Fe concentrations in the deep-water column were variable with different T-Fe levels among stations and depths. We found a significant relationship of the exponential increase in the T-Fe concentrations with decreasing water transmittance, resulting from the iron supply into the deep and bottom waters due to the lateral transport of resuspended sediment from the continental slope.

Journal Articles

Iron in the Japan Sea and its implications for the physical processes in deep water

Takata, Hyoe*; Kuma, Kenshi*; Isoda, Yutaka*; Otosaka, Shigeyoshi; Senju, Tomoharu*; Minakawa, Masayuki*

Geophysical Research Letters, 35(2), p.L02606_1 - L02606_5, 2008/01

Concentrations of iron in seawater (dissolved and labile dissolved phases) in the two basins (Yamato Basin and Japan Basin) of the Japan Sea are measured and the origin and behavior of iron were discussed. Extremely high vertically integrated total dissolvable Fe inventories (300-350 $$mu$$mol m$$^{-2}$$) were observed at the surface water in both basins (0-200 m depth), and was probably resulting from high atmospheric Fe input to the surface water. Labile dissolved Fe in both basins was characterized by mid-depth (1-2 km depth) maxima, which were regulated by the competition between dissolved Fe input from the microbial decomposition of sinking biogenic organic matter and Fe removal by particulate scavenging. The distributions of Fe in the Japan Sea would play an important role in understanding the biogeochemical cycle of iron in the ocean.

Journal Articles

Benthic front and the Yamato Basin Bottom Water in the Japan Sea

Senju, Tomoharu*; Isoda, Yutaka*; Aramaki, Takafumi*; Otosaka, Shigeyoshi; Fujio, Shinzo*; Yanagimoto, Daigo*; Suzuki, Takashi; Kuma, Kenshi*; Mori, Kosuke*

Journal of Oceanography, 61(6), p.1047 - 1058, 2005/12

 Times Cited Count:8 Percentile:18.19(Oceanography)

The detail structure of the Bottom Water in the Japan Sea was revealed by the hydrographic observations. The Yamato Basin Bottom Water (YBBW) exhibits higher temperature, lower dissolved oxygen, and higher nutrients concentrations than those in the Japan Basin Bottom Water (JBBW). Both Bottom Waters meet around the boundary region between the Yamato and the Japan Basins, and form a clear benthic front. It is inferred from the property distributions that the JBBW flowing into the Yamato Basin is trapped by the cyclonic circulation in the basin, and modified to the YBBW in the course of the circulation through the vertical diffusion, geothermal heating and oxygen consumption. The thermal balance of in the YYBW was examined using a box-model. The results show that the effect of geothermal heating has about 70 per-cent of magnitude to the vertical thermal diffusion and both terms cancel the advection term of the cold JBBW from the Japan Basin. The box-model also estimated the averaged residence time for the YBBW was 9.1 years.

Journal Articles

Benthic front between the Japan Basin and the Yamato Basin in the Japan Sea

Senju, Tomoharu*; Isoda, Yutaka*; Aramaki, Takafumi; Otosaka, Shigeyoshi; Suzuki, Takashi; Kuma, Kenshi*; Mori, Kosuke*

Proceedings of 12th PAMS/JECSS Workshop, p.3_4_1 - 3_4_4, 2003/11

Abyssal water mass distribution from the Yamato Basin to the Japan Basin in the Japan Sea was observed on the R/V Hakuho-Maru cruise, KH02-3 (October 14-19, 2002). The bottom layer in the Yamato Basin was occupied by the water of higher temperature and lower oxygen compared to that in the Japan Basin. As a result, a benthic front of potential temperature and dissolved oxygen was formed between the Yamato and Japan Basins. Dissolved oxygen and nutrients concentrations show that the bottom water in the Yamato Basin is older than that in the Japan Basin. This indicates the existence of the Yamato Basin Water, which is modified bottom water by the closed circulation in the Yamato Basin. The structure of the benthic front suggests an estuary-like circulation around the mouth of the Yamato Basin; outflow from the Yamato Basin lying on the inflow from the Japan Basin. The highest oxygen water was found on the slope of southern periphery of the Japan Basin. This is considered to be the bottom water from the west transported by the cyclonic circulation in the Japan Basin.

Oral presentation

Behavior of iron in the Yamato Basin and the Japan Basin, Japan Sea

Takata, Hyoe*; Kuma, Kenshi*; Isoda, Yutaka*; Nishioka, Jun*; Otosaka, Shigeyoshi; Chikira, Mitsuru*; Takagi, Shogo*; Kamei, Yoshihiko*; Sakaoka, Keiichiro*

no journal, , 

The authors discussed on the difference of behavior of iron between two basins (the Yamato Basin and Japan Basin) in the Japan Sea by measurements of iron (dissolved and labile dissolved phases) and nutrients in seawater. Concentration of labile dissolved iron in the surface water was about 1.0 nM and did not show difference between the basins. On the other hand, concentration of labile dissolved iron in the Japan Basin increased to 4.5 nM at 1-2 km depth and decreased to 4 nM in the bottom layer. In the Yamato Basin, concentration of labile dissolved iron in deep water increased uniformly and was about 6 nM at the bottom layer. The difference in distribution of iron in seawater indicates that the transport processes of biogenic elements in the deep layers are different between the basins of the Japan Sea.

Oral presentation

Vertical profile of DOC-14 in the Japan Sea

Tanaka, Takayuki; Otosaka, Shigeyoshi; Amano, Hikaru; Togawa, Orihiko; Senju, Tomoharu*; Isoda, Yutaka*; Kuma, Kenshi*

no journal, , 

no abstracts in English

Oral presentation

Circulation and properties of deepwater in the Japan Sea inferred from distribution of multiple tracers

Aramaki, Takafumi*; Otosaka, Shigeyoshi; Takahata, Naoto*; Isoda, Yutaka*; Kuma, Kenshi*; Senju, Tomoharu*

no journal, , 

Deep part of the Japan Sea ($$>$$ 2000m depth) consists of seawater with uniform salinity and temperature. This structure complicated us to understand the transport processes of the deepwater circulation in the sea. By the Japan Sea Expeditions carried out by JAEA from 1997 to 2002, the authors measured isotopic ratio of radiocarbon in seawater as a tracer of seawater movement. As a result, it has been inferred that the deep water is formed in the plural regions of the sea and that the northwestern region is primary region of deep water formation. In the present study, we obtained data of tritium concentration and isotopic ratio of helium as additional indicators, and discussed the detailed deepwater circulation to describe another origin of the deep water.

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