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Journal Articles

Thermally altered subsurface material of asteroid (162173) Ryugu

Kitazato, Kohei*; Milliken, R. E.*; Iwata, Takahiro*; Abe, Masanao*; Otake, Makiko*; Matsuura, Shuji*; Takagi, Yasuhiko*; Nakamura, Tomoki*; Hiroi, Takahiro*; Matsuoka, Moe*; et al.

Nature Astronomy (Internet), 5(3), p.246 - 250, 2021/03

 Times Cited Count:30 Percentile:96.87(Astronomy & Astrophysics)

Here we report observations of Ryugu's subsurface material by the Near-Infrared Spectrometer (NIRS3) on the Hayabusa2 spacecraft. Reflectance spectra of excavated material exhibit a hydroxyl (OH) absorption feature that is slightly stronger and peak-shifted compared with that observed for the surface, indicating that space weathering and/or radiative heating have caused subtle spectral changes in the uppermost surface. However, the strength and shape of the OH feature still suggests that the subsurface material experienced heating above 300 $$^{circ}$$C, similar to the surface. In contrast, thermophysical modeling indicates that radiative heating does not increase the temperature above 200 $$^{circ}$$C at the estimated excavation depth of 1 m, even if the semimajor axis is reduced to 0.344 au. This supports the hypothesis that primary thermal alteration occurred due to radiogenic and/or impact heating on Ryugu's parent body.

Journal Articles

Development of the ReaxFF methodology for electrolyte-water systems

Fedkin, M. V.*; Shin, Y. K.*; Dasgupta, N.*; Yeon, J.*; Zhang, W.*; van Duin, D.*; Van Duin, A. C. T.*; Mori, Kento*; Fujiwara, Atsushi*; Machida, Masahiko; et al.

Journal of Physical Chemistry A, 123(10), p.2125 - 2141, 2019/03

 Times Cited Count:38 Percentile:94.63(Chemistry, Physical)

no abstracts in English

Oral presentation

Carbon-14 measurements of PM$$_{2.5}$$ from Noto peninsular in Kanazawa, Japan

Yamada, Reina*; Ikemori, Fumikazu*; Nakamura, Toshio*; Minami, Masayo*; Watanabe, Takahiro; Kinouchi, Kento*; Matsuki, Atsushi*

no journal, , 

PM$$_{2.5}$$ is becoming the focus of international attention, particularly in eastern Asia, because of air pollution and the health risks. Carbon is one of the major components in aerosol. Therefore, sources of the carbon compound should be known for the understanding material cycles and mechanism of the rise. Radiocarbon analysis is unique and useful techniques for estimation of carbon sources in environmental samples including aerosol. Hence half-life of radiocarbon is 5730 years, percent modern carbon (pMC) value based on radiocarbon concentration of fossil fuels are negligible. Therefore, pMC value can reveal the components of carbon in aerosol (biomass carbon versus fossil fuel). In this study, aerosol samples were taken at Noto Peninsula in Ishikawa pref., Japan, in order to estimate contribution rate of biomass carbon and/or fossil fuel in PM$$_{2.5}$$. The pMC values of PM$$_{2.5}$$ at Noto were more than 70 in the summer of 2014. These results show that biomass contribution is relative high in the area.

Oral presentation

Source apportionment of carbonaceous matter in PM$$_{2.5}$$ at NOTO peninsula using $$^{14}$$C analysis

Yamada, Reina*; Ikemori, Fumikazu*; Nakamura, Toshio*; Minami, Masayo*; Watanabe, Takahiro; Kinouchi, Kento*; Matsuki, Atsushi*

no journal, , 

Aerosols and clouds seeded by them both affect the heat budget of the Earth, but their RF (radiative forcing) still involves large uncertainty (IPCC 2013). One of the least understood properties of aerosols is the source and contribution of the organics. Our recent observation revealed that submicron aerosol particles in Noto peninsula also have a relatively high concentration (approximately more than 50%) of carbonaceous matter throughout the year. It is difficult to presume its sources specifying its chemical species in many scenes because of its great variety. However, we can presume its source by using carbon isotope ratio. We conducted sampling in NOTOGRO (NOTO ground-based research observatory), lying at the edge of Noto peninsula, from 26th Jun to 23rd July, 2014. We corrected PM$$_{2.5}$$ using high volume air sampler for every week. Flow rate was 700L/min, and quartz fiber filter was used for sampling. $$^{14}$$C was analyzed using AMS $$^{14}$$C system (High Voltage Engineering Europe, Model 4130-AMS) and $$^{13}$$C using IRMS (isotope ratio mass spectrometer) in Nagoya University. As a result, it was found that 4 samples collected from 26th Jun to 23rd July had approximately 70 percent modern carbon (pMC). This result shows that modern plant (and/or biomass burning) activities mainly contribute to the submicron organic particle concentration in Noto peninsula.

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