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Journal Articles

Welding technology on sector assembly of the JT-60SA vacuum vessel

Shibama, Yusuke; Okano, Fuminori; Yagyu, Junichi; Kaminaga, Atsushi; Miyo, Yasuhiko; Hayakawa, Atsuro*; Sagawa, Keiich*; Mochida, Tsutomu*; Morimoto, Tamotsu*; Hamada, Takashi*; et al.

Fusion Engineering and Design, 98-99, p.1614 - 1619, 2015/10

 Times Cited Count:3 Percentile:32.14(Nuclear Science & Technology)

The JT-60SA vacuum vessel (150 tons) is a double wall torus structure and the maximum major radius of 5.0 m and height of 6.6 m. The manufacturing design concept is that the vessel is split in the 10 toroidal sectors manufactured at factory, and assembled on-site; seven of the 40-degree sectors, two of the 30-degree beside final one, and the final of the 20-degree. The final sector is assembled with the VV thermal shield and toroidal field magnets into the 340-degree as prepared in one sector. Sectors are temporally fitted on-site and adjusted one over the other before the assembly. After measurement of the dimensions and the reference, these sectors are transferred onto the cryostat base. First, three 80-degree sectors are manufactured with mating each 40-degree sector by direct joint welding. The rest sectors including the final sector are jointed with splice plates. Welding manipulator and its guide rails are used for these welding. In this paper, the detail of the VV sectors assembly including the final sector is explained. Welding technologies to joint the two of 40-degree sectors are reported with the present manufacturing status and the welding trial on the vertical stub with the partial mock-up of the final sector are discussed with the assembly process.

Journal Articles

Dismantlement of large fusion experimental device JT-60U

Ikeda, Yoshitaka; Okano, Fuminori; Sakasai, Akira; Hanada, Masaya; Akino, Noboru; Ichige, Hisashi; Kaminaga, Atsushi; Kiyono, Kimihiro; Kubo, Hirotaka; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; et al.

Nihon Genshiryoku Gakkai Wabun Rombunshi, 13(4), p.167 - 178, 2014/12

The JT-60U torus was disassembled so as to newly install the superconducting tokamak JT-60SA torus. The JT-60U used the deuterium for 18 years, so the disassembly project of the JT-60U was the first disassembly experience of a fusion device with radioactivation in Japan. All disassembly components were stored with recording the data such as dose rate, weight and kind of material, so as to apply the clearance level regulation in future. The lessons learned from the disassembly project indicated that the cutting technologies and storage management of disassembly components were the key factors to conduct the disassembly project in an efficient way. After completing the disassembly project, efforts have been made to analyze the data for characterizing disassembly activities, so as to contribute the estimation of manpower needs and the radioactivation of the disassembly components on other fusion devices.

Journal Articles

Disassembly of JT-60 tokamak device

Okano, Fuminori; Ikeda, Yoshitaka; Sakasai, Akira; Hanada, Masaya

Dai-27-Kai Genshiryoku Shisetsu Dekomisshoningu Gijutsu Koza Tekisuto, p.73 - 102, 2014/10

The disassembly of JT-60 tokamak device and its peripheral equipments, where the total weight was about 5400 tons, started in 2009 and accomplished in October 2012. This disassembly was required process for JT-60SA project, which is the Satellite Tokamak project under Japan-EU international corroboration to modify the JT-60 to the superconducting tokamak. This work was the first experience of disassembling a large radioactive fusion device based on Radiation Hazard Prevention Act in Japan. The cutting was one of the main problems in this disassembly, such as to cut the wielded parts together with toroidal field coils, and to cut the vacuum vessel into two. After solving these problems, the disassembly completed without disaster and accident.

Journal Articles

Safe disassembly and storage of radioactive components of JT-60U torus

Ikeda, Yoshitaka; Okano, Fuminori; Hanada, Masaya; Sakasai, Akira; Kubo, Hirotaka; Akino, Noboru; Chiba, Shinichi; Ichige, Hisashi; Kaminaga, Atsushi; Kiyono, Kimihiro; et al.

Fusion Engineering and Design, 89(9-10), p.2018 - 2023, 2014/10

 Times Cited Count:2 Percentile:19.81(Nuclear Science & Technology)

Disassembly of the JT-60U torus was started in 2009 after 18-years D$$_{2}$$ operations, and was completed in October 2012. The JT-60U torus was featured by the complicated and welded structure against the strong electromagnetic force, and by the radioactivation due to D-D reactions. Since this work is the first experience of disassembling a large radioactive fusion device in Japan, careful disassembly activities have been made. About 13,000 components cut into pieces with measuring the dose rates were removed from the torus hall and stored safely in storage facilities by using a total wokers of 41,000 person-days during 3 years. The total weight of the disassembly components reached up to 5,400 tons. Most of the disassembly components will be treated as non-radioactive ones after the clearance verification under the Japanese regulation in future. The assembly of JT-60SA has started in January 2013 after this disassembly of JT-60U torus.

Journal Articles

Disassembly of JT-60 tokamak device for JT-60SA Project; Disassembly of radioactivated large structures

Okano, Fuminori; Ikeda, Yoshitaka; Sakasai, Akira; Hanada, Masaya; JT-60 Team

Purazuma, Kaku Yugo Gakkai-Shi, 90(10), p.630 - 639, 2014/10

JT-60 tokamak device, as a largest nuclear fusion device in the world, started the experiments since 1985 and had accomplished the research and development of plasma performance toward the DEMO. The project has successfully completed it operation in August 2008 with many results such as accomplishment of break-even plasma condition in 1996. This disassembly was required for JT-60SA project, which is the Satellite Tokamak project under Japan-EU international corroboration to modify the JT-60 to the superconducting tokamak. This work was the first experience of disassembling a large radioactive fusion device based on Radiation Hazard Prevention Act in Japan. This report presents the outline of disassembly of JT-60 tokamak device.

Journal Articles

Assembly metrology for JT-60SA using the laser tracker

Nishiyama, Tomokazu; Yagyu, Junichi; Nakamura, Shigetoshi; Masaki, Kei; Okano, Fuminori; Sakasai, Akira

Heisei-26-Nendo Hokkaido Daigaku Sogo Gijutsu Kenkyukai Hokokushu (DVD-ROM), 6 Pages, 2014/09

no abstracts in English

JAEA Reports

Storage management of disassembled and radioactive components of JT-60 tokamak device; Storage of radioactive components by containers

Nishiyama, Tomokazu; Miyo, Yasuhiko; Okano, Fuminori; Sasajima, Tadayuki; Ichige, Hisashi; Kaminaga, Atsushi; Miya, Naoyuki; Sukegawa, Atsuhiko; Ikeda, Yoshitaka; Sakasai, Akira

JAEA-Technology 2014-006, 30 Pages, 2014/03

JAEA-Technology-2014-006.pdf:4.87MB

JT-60 tokamak device and the peripheral equipment were disassembled so as to be upgraded to the superconducting tokamak JT-60SA. The disassembled components were stored into storage and airtight containers at the radioactive control area. The total weight and the total number of those components are about 1,100 tons and about 11,500 except for large components. Radiation measurements and records of the radioactive components were required one by one under the law of Act on Prevention of Radiation Disease Due to Radioisotopes, etc. for the control of transport and storage from the radioactive control area to the other area. The storage management of the radioactive components was implemented by establishing the work procedure and the component management system by barcode tags. The radioactive components as many as 11,500 were surely and effectively stored under the law. The report gives the outline of the storage of JT-60 radioactive components by the storage containers.

JAEA Reports

Disassembly of JT-60 tokamak device and ancillary facilities for JT-60 tokamak

Okano, Fuminori; Ichige, Hisashi; Miyo, Yasuhiko; Kaminaga, Atsushi; Sasajima, Tadayuki; Nishiyama, Tomokazu; Yagyu, Junichi; Ishige, Yoichi; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Komuro, Kenichi; et al.

JAEA-Technology 2014-003, 125 Pages, 2014/03

JAEA-Technology-2014-003.pdf:13.32MB

The disassembly of JT-60 tokamak device and its peripheral equipments, where the total weight was about 5400 tons, started in 2009 and accomplished in October 2012. This disassembly was required process for JT-60SA project, which is the Satellite Tokamak project under Japan-EU international corroboration to modify the JT-60 to the superconducting tokamak. This work was the first experience of disassembling a large radioactive fusion device based on Radiation Hazard Prevention Act in Japan. The cutting was one of the main problems in this disassembly, such as to cut the wielded parts together with toroidal field coils, and to cut the vacuum vessel into two. After solving these problems, the disassembly completed without disaster and accident. This report presents the outline of the JT-60 disassembly, especially tokamak device and ancillary facilities for tokamak device.

Journal Articles

Disassembly of JT-60 tokamak device

Okano, Fuminori; Ikeda, Yoshitaka; Sakasai, Akira; Hanada, Masaya; JT-60 Team

NIFS-MEMO-67, p.344 - 352, 2014/02

no abstracts in English

JAEA Reports

Assembly work and transport of JT-60SA cryostat base

Okano, Fuminori; Masaki, Kei; Yagyu, Junichi; Shibama, Yusuke; Sakasai, Akira; Miyo, Yasuhiko; Kaminaga, Atsushi; Nishiyama, Tomokazu; Suzuki, Sadaaki; Nakamura, Shigetoshi; et al.

JAEA-Technology 2013-032, 32 Pages, 2013/11

JAEA-Technology-2013-032.pdf:8.86MB

Japan Atomic Energy Agency started to construct a fully superconducting tokamak experiment device, JT-60SA, to support the ITER since January, 2013 at the Fusion Research and Development Directorate in Naka, Japan. The JT-60SA will be constructed with enhancing the previous JT-60 infrastructures, in the JT-60 torus hall, where the ex-JT-60 machine was disassembled. The JT-60SA Cryostat Base, for base of the entire tokamak structure, were assembly as first step of this construction. The Cryostat Base (CB, 250 tons) is consists of 7 main made of stainless steel, 12m diameter and 3m height. It was built in the Spain and transported to the Naka site with the seven major parts split, via Hitachi port. The assembly work of these steps, preliminary measurements, sole plate adjustments of its height and flatness, and assembly of the CB. Introduces the concrete result of assembly work and transport of JT-60SA cryostat base.

JAEA Reports

Disassembly of JT-60 tokamak device

Okano, Fuminori; Ikeda, Yoshitaka; Sakasai, Akira; Hanada, Masaya; Ichige, Hisashi; Miyo, Yasuhiko; Kaminaga, Atsushi; Sasajima, Tadayuki; Nishiyama, Tomokazu; Yagyu, Junichi; et al.

JAEA-Technology 2013-031, 42 Pages, 2013/11

JAEA-Technology-2013-031.pdf:18.1MB

The disassembly of JT-60 tokamak device and its peripheral equipments, where the total weight was about 6200 tons, started in 2009 and accomplished in October 2012. This disassembly was required process for JT-60SA project, which is the Satellite Tokamak project under Japan-EU international corroboration to modify the JT-60 to the superconducting tokamak. This work was the first experience of disassembling a large radioactive fusion device based on Radiation Hazard Prevention Act in Japan. The cutting was one of the main problems in this disassembly, such as to cut the wielded parts together with toroidal field coils, and to cut the vacuum vessel into two. After solving these problems, the disassembly completed without disaster and accident. This report presents the outline of the JT-60 disassembly, especially tokamak device.

Journal Articles

Disassembly of JT-60 tokamak device

Okano, Fuminori; Ikeda, Yoshitaka; Sakasai, Akira; Hanada, Masaya; JT-60 Team

Dekomisshoningu Giho, (48), p.10 - 23, 2013/09

The disassembly of JT-60 tokamak device and its peripheral equipments, where the total weight was about 6200 tons, started in 2009 and accomplished in October 2012. This disassembly was required process for JT-60SA project, which is the Satellite Tokamak project under Japan-EU international corroboration to modify the JT-60 to the superconducting tokamak. This work was the first experience of disassembling a large radioactive fusion device based on Radiation Hazard Prevention Act in Japan. The cutting was one of the main problems in this disassembly, such as to cut the wielded parts together with toroidal field coils, and to cut the vacuum vessel into two. After solving these problems, the disassembly completed without disaster and accident. This report presents the outline of disassembly of JT-60 tokamak device.

Journal Articles

Storage and safety management of radioactive components for disassembly of JT-60 tokamak device

Nishiyama, Tomokazu; Okano, Fuminori; Miyo, Yasuhiko; Kubo, Hirotaka; Miya, Naoyuki; Oikawa, Akira; Sasajima, Tadayuki; Sakasai, Akira

Heisei-22-Nendo Kumamoto Daigaku Sogo Gijutsu Kenkyukai Hokokushu (CD-ROM), 5 Pages, 2011/03

no abstracts in English

Journal Articles

Design of a new P-NBI control system for 100-s injection in JT-60SA

Okano, Fuminori; Shinozaki, Shinichi; Honda, Atsushi; Oshima, Katsumi; Numazawa, Susumu*; Ikeda, Yoshitaka

Fusion Engineering and Design, 83(2-3), p.280 - 282, 2008/04

 Times Cited Count:0 Percentile:0.01(Nuclear Science & Technology)

no abstracts in English

Journal Articles

Application of PLC to dynamic control system for liquid He cryogenic pumping facility on JT-60U NBI system

Honda, Atsushi; Okano, Fuminori; Oshima, Katsumi; Akino, Noboru; Kikuchi, Katsumi; Tanai, Yutaka; Takenouchi, Tadashi; Numazawa, Susumu*; Ikeda, Yoshitaka

Fusion Engineering and Design, 83(2-3), p.276 - 279, 2008/04

 Times Cited Count:11 Percentile:62.49(Nuclear Science & Technology)

The control system of the cryogenic facility in the JT-60 NBI system has been renewed by employing the PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) and SCADA (Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition) system. The original control system was constructed about 20 years ago by specifying the DCS (Distributed Control System) computer to deal with 400 feedback loops. Recently, troubles on this control system have increased due to its aged deterioration. To maintain a high reliability of the cryogenic facility, a new control system has been intended with PLC and SCADA system. By optimizing the function blocks and connecting them in the FBD language, the feedback loops in the new control system have been successfully replaced from DCS to PLC without software developer. At present, the new control system has worked well. This is the first application of the marketable PLC to the actual system with feedback loops of $$>$$ 400 produced by the user itself.

Journal Articles

Technical design of NBI system for JT-60SA

Ikeda, Yoshitaka; Akino, Noboru; Ebisawa, Noboru; Hanada, Masaya; Inoue, Takashi; Honda, Atsushi; Kamada, Masaki; Kawai, Mikito; Kazawa, Minoru; Kikuchi, Katsumi; et al.

Fusion Engineering and Design, 82(5-14), p.791 - 797, 2007/10

 Times Cited Count:19 Percentile:79.3(Nuclear Science & Technology)

Modification of JT-60U to a superconducting device (so called JT-60SA) has been planned to contribute to ITER and DEMO. The NBI system is required to inject 34 MW for 100 s. The upgraded NBI system consists of twelve positive ion based NBI (P-NBI) units and one negative ion based NBI (N-NBI) unit. The injection power of the P-NBI units are 2 MW each at 85 keV, and the N-NBI unit will be 10 MW at 500 keV, respectively. On JT-60U, the long pulse operation of 30 s at 2 MW (85 keV) and 20 s at 3.2 MW (320 keV) have been achieved on P-NBI and N-NBI units, respectively. Since the temperature increase of the cooling water in both ion sources is saturated within 20 s, further pulse extension up to 100 s is expected to mainly modify the power supply systems in addition to modification of the N-NBI ion source for high acceleration voltage. The detailed technical design of the NBI system for JT-60SA is presented.

JAEA Reports

Development of protection system for power supply facilities in JT-60U P-NBI for long pulse operation

Oshima, Katsumi; Okano, Fuminori; Honda, Atsushi; Shinozaki, Shinichi; Usui, Katsutomi; Noto, Katsuya; Kawai, Mikito; Ikeda, Yoshitaka

JAEA-Technology 2007-044, 27 Pages, 2007/06

JAEA-Technology-2007-044.pdf:26.9MB

In the positive ion based NBI (P-NBI) system, we have developed a protection system to protect the power supply facilities from over load during long pulse operation. The protection system monitors the voltage (V) and current (I) in the power supply facilities, and calculates the parameters of V2t and I2t in real-time, where T is the pulse duration. It turns off the power supply facilities when V2t and I2t are beyond the critical values. After two development stages, we have completed the protection system using a package typed PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) which has a high expandability of multi-unit operation. Moreover, we have constructed a user-friendly system by using a SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) system.

JAEA Reports

Design study of a new P-NBI control system for 100-s injection in JT-60SA

Honda, Atsushi; Okano, Fuminori; Shinozaki, Shinichi; Oshima, Katsumi; Numazawa, Susumu*; Ikeda, Yoshitaka

JAEA-Technology 2007-026, 19 Pages, 2007/03

JAEA-Technology-2007-026.pdf:3.36MB

The modification of the JT-60U to a fully superconducting coil tokamak, JT-60SA (Super Advanced), has been programmed as the satellite devise for the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) and as the national centralized tokamak. The present positive-ion-based NBI system (P-NBI), which has been operated for 20 years and will be the main heating system on JT-60SA, is required to manage the long pulse injection extended from 30 s to 100 s at the power of 24 MW with 12 units. To realize such a requirement, the original control system handling more than 4000 digital data is to be fully remodeled. Design study of the new control system has been conducted from viewpoint of market availability, system extensibility, cost-effectiveness and independent development in programming. It has been concluded that a distributed control system using PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) could be applied to the large-scale control system for 100-s operations with satisfaction of the evaluation viewpoints.

Journal Articles

Present status of the negative ion based NBI system for long pulse operation on JT-60U

Ikeda, Yoshitaka; Umeda, Naotaka; Akino, Noboru; Ebisawa, Noboru; Grisham, L. R.*; Hanada, Masaya; Honda, Atsushi; Inoue, Takashi; Kawai, Mikito; Kazawa, Minoru; et al.

Nuclear Fusion, 46(6), p.S211 - S219, 2006/06

 Times Cited Count:52 Percentile:86.86(Physics, Fluids & Plasmas)

Recently, the extension of the pulse duration up to 30 sec has been intended to study quasi-steady state plasma on JT-60U N-NBI system. The most serious issue is to reduce the heat load on the grids for long pulse operation. Two modifications have been proposed to reduce the heat load. One is to suppress the beam spread which may be caused by beamlet-beamlet interaction in the multi-aperture grid due to the space charge force. Thin plates were attached on the extraction grid to modify the local electric field. The plate thickness was optimized to steer the beamlet deflection. The other is to reduce the stripping loss, where the electron of the negative ion beam is stripped and accelerated in the ion source and then collides with the grids. The ion source was modified to reduce the pressure in the accelerator column to suppress the beam-ion stripping loss. Up to now, long pulse injection of 17 sec for 1.6 MW and 25 sec for $$sim$$1 MW has been obtained by one ion source with these modifications.

JAEA Reports

PLC control of NBI cryogenic facility on JT-60U

Honda, Atsushi; Okano, Fuminori; Oshima, Katsumi; Akino, Noboru; Kikuchi, Katsumi; Tanai, Yutaka; Takenouchi, Tadashi; Numazawa, Susumu*

JAEA-Technology 2006-020, 20 Pages, 2006/03

JAEA-Technology-2006-020.pdf:2.96MB

no abstracts in English

61 (Records 1-20 displayed on this page)