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Journal Articles

A New Standard DNA Damage (SDD) data format

Schuemann, J.*; McNamara, A. L.*; Warmenhoven, J. W.*; Henthorn, N. T.*; Kirkby, K.*; Merchant, M. J.*; Ingram, S.*; Paganetti, H.*; Held, K. D.*; Ramos-Mendez, J.*; et al.

Radiation Research, 191(1), p.76 - 93, 2019/01

 Times Cited Count:40 Percentile:97.13(Biology)

We propose a new Standard DNA Damage (SDD) data format to unify the interface between the simulation of damage induction in DNA and the biological modelling of DNA repair processes, and introduce the effect of the environment (molecular oxygen or other compounds) as a flexible parameter. Such a standard greatly facilitates inter-model comparisons, providing an ideal environment to tease out model assumptions and identify persistent, underlying mechanisms. Through inter-model comparisons, this unified standard has the potential to greatly advance our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of radiation-induced DNA damage and the resulting observable biological effects when radiation parameters and/or environmental conditions change.

Journal Articles

Genetic changes in progeny of bystander human fibroblasts after microbeam irradiation with X-rays, protons or carbon ions; The Relevance to cancer risk

Autsavapromporn, N.*; Plante, I.*; Liu, C.*; Konishi, Teruaki*; Usami, Noriko*; Funayama, Tomoo; Azzam, E.*; Murakami, Takeshi*; Suzuki, Masao*

International Journal of Radiation Biology, 91(1), p.62 - 70, 2015/01

 Times Cited Count:28 Percentile:94.21(Biology)

Radiation-induced bystander effects have important implications in radiotherapy. Their persistence in normal cells may contribute to risk of health hazards, including cancer. This study investigates the role of radiation quality and gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in the propagation of harmful effects in progeny of bystander cells. Confluent human skin fibroblasts were exposed to microbeam radiations with different linear energy transfer (LET) by which 0.036$$sim$$0.4% of the cells were directly targeted by radiation. Following 20 population doublings, the cells were harvested and assayed for micronucleus formation, gene mutation and protein oxidation. The results showed that expression of stressful effects in the progeny of bystander cells is dependent on LET.

Journal Articles

Radiation-quality-dependent bystander effects induced by the microbeams with different radiation sources

Suzuki, Masao*; Autsavapromporn, N.*; Usami, Noriko*; Funayama, Tomoo; Plante, I.*; Yokota, Yuichiro; Muto, Yasuko*; Suzuki, Michiyo; Ikeda, Hiroko; Hattori, Yuya; et al.

Journal of Radiation Research, 55(Suppl.1), P. i54, 2014/03

Journal Articles

Gap junction communication and the propagation of bystander effects induced by microbeam irradiation in human fibroblast cultures; The Impact of radiation quality

Autsavapromporn, N.*; Suzuki, Masao*; Funayama, Tomoo; Usami, Noriko*; Plante, I.*; Yokota, Yuichiro; Muto, Yasuko*; Ikeda, Hiroko; Kobayashi, Katsumi*; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; et al.

Radiation Research, 180(4), p.367 - 375, 2013/10

 Times Cited Count:53 Percentile:90.3(Biology)

We investigated the role of gapjunction intercellular communication (GJIC) in the propagation of stressful effects in confluent normal human fibroblast cultures wherein only 0.036-0.144% of cells in the population were traversed by primary radiation tracks. Confluent cells were exposed to graded doses from X ray, carbon ion, neon ion or argon ion microbeams in the presence or absence of an inhibitor of GJIC. After 4 h incubation, the cells were assayed for micronucleus (MN) formation. Micronuclei were induced in a greater fraction of cells than expected based on the fraction of cells targeted by primary radiation, and the effect occurred in a dose-dependent manner with any of the radiation sources. Interestingly, the inhibition of GJIC depressed the enhancement of MN formation in bystander cells from cultures exposed to high-LET radiation but not low-LET radiation. The results highlight the important role of radiation quality and dose in the observed effects.

Oral presentation

Late effects in the progeny of bystander human cells are dependent on radiation quality; The Relevance to cancer risk

Autsavapromporn, N.*; Plante, I.*; Liu, C.*; Konishi, Teruaki*; Usami, Noriko*; Funayama, Tomoo; Azzam, E.*; Murakami, Takeshi*; Suzuki, Masao*

no journal, , 

Confluent human skin fibroblasts (NB1RGB) were exposed to various types of microbeam with a different linear energy transfer (LET) at mean absorbed doses 0.4 Gy, wherein 0.036-0.4% of the cells were targeted by IR. Following 20 populations post-irradiation, the cells were harvested and assayed for micronucleus formation, mutation assay and protein oxidation. The progeny of bystander cells exposed to X rays and protons showed the persistence of oxidative stress, and correlate with the increased micronucleus formation and mutant fraction. However, such effects were not observed after irradiation by carbon ions. Interestingly, inhibition of GJIC mitigated the damaging effects in the progeny of bystander cells exposed to protons and carbon ions but not X rays. These data show carbon ions can reduce cancer risk after microbeam irradiation compared with X rays or protons, and GJIC may be a critical mediator in the observed effect.

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