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Journal Articles

Challenging studies by accelerator mass spectrometry for the development of environmental radiology; Status report on the analysis of $$^{90}$$Sr and $$^{135}$$Cs by AMS

Honda, Maki; Martschini, M.*; Wieser, A.*; Marchhart, O.*; Lachner, J.*; Priller, A.*; Steier, P.*; Golser, R.*; Sakaguchi, Aya*

JAEA-Conf 2022-001, p.85 - 90, 2022/11

Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an analytical method that combines mass spectrometry with a tandem accelerator, which has been used mainly in nuclear physics experiments. AMS is used to measure radionuclides with half-lives of 10$$^{3}$$-10$$^{8}$$ years. For radionuclides with half-lives of this order, the method of measuring their mass is 10$$^{3}$$-10$$^{6}$$ times more sensitive than measuring their activity. Because of this advantage, AMS has been widely applied in Earth and planetary sciences, atomic energy research, and other fields. Among the various studies, Wallner et al. (2021, 2016) have achieved excellent work in Earth and planetary sciences. For example, they have attained the ultra-sensitive analysis of $$^{60}$$Fe and $$^{244}$$Pu in environmental samples. These are radionuclides produced by rapid-neutron-capture (r-process) nucleosynthesis. Our recent work shows that a new AMS system (VERA, University of Vienna), which combines laser isobaric separation and a typical AMS system, has been successfully applied to the ultra-sensitive determination of $$^{90}$$Sr and $$^{135}$$Cs in environment. For $$^{90}$$Sr in environmental samples, the $$beta$$-ray measurement by the milking of the daughter nuclide $$^{90}$$Y is still the principal method, which takes 3-6 weeks. The new AMS method has a detection limit of $$<$$ 0.1 mBq, which is comparable to that of $$beta$$-ray measurement, with a more straightforward chemical treatment than $$beta$$-measurement. Our achievement demonstrates that AMS can be a practical new method for determining $$^{90}$$Sr in the environment.

Journal Articles

Novel $$^{90}$$Sr analysis of environmental samples by ion-laser interaction mass spectrometry

Honda, Maki; Martschini, M.*; Marchhart, O.*; Priller, A.*; Steier, P.*; Golser, R.*; Sato, Tetsuya; Tsukada, Kazuaki; Sakaguchi, Aya*

Analytical Methods, 14(28), p.2732 - 2738, 2022/07

 Times Cited Count:2 Percentile:56.45(Chemistry, Analytical)

The sensitive $$^{90}$$Sr analysis with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was developed for the advances of environmental radiology. One advantage of AMS is the ability to analyze various environmental samples with $$^{90}$$Sr/$$^{88}$$Sr atomic ratios of 10$$^{-14}$$ in a simple chemical separation. Three different IAEA samples with known $$^{90}$$Sr concentrations (moss-soil, animal bone, Syrian soil: 1 g each) were analyzed to assess the validity of the chemical separation and the AMS measurement. The $$^{90}$$Sr measurements were conducted on the AMS system combined with the Ion Laser InterAction MasSpectrometry (ILIAMS) setup at the University of Vienna, which has excellent isobaric separation performance. The isobaric interference of $$^{90}$$Zr in the $$^{90}$$Sr AMS was first removed by chemical separation. The separation factor of Zr in two-step column chromatography with Sr resin and anion exchange resin was 10$$^{6}$$. The $$^{90}$$Zr remaining in the sample was removed by ILIAMS effectively. This simple chemical separation achieved a limit of detection $$<$$ 0.1 mBq in the $$^{90}$$Sr AMS, which is lower than typical $$beta$$-ray detection. The agreement between AMS measurements and nominal values for the $$^{90}$$Sr concentrations of IAEA samples indicated that the new highly-sensitive $$^{90}$$Sr analysis in the environmental samples with AMS is reliable even for high matrix samples of soil and bone.

Oral presentation

Feasibility of $$^{90}$$Sr measurements using accelerator mass spectrometry

Honda, Maki; Martschini, M.*; Marchhart, O.*; Priller, A.*; Steier, P.*; Golser, R.*; Sakaguchi, Aya*; Sueki, Keisuke*

no journal, , 

no abstracts in English

Oral presentation

Pioneering applications in AMS for the development of environmental radiology; Studies towards the implementation of $$^{90}$$Sr and $$^{135}$$Cs AMS

Honda, Maki; Martschini, M.*; Lachner, J.*; Marchhart, O.*; Wieser, A.*; Priller, A.*; Steier, P.*; Golser, R.*; Sakaguchi, Aya*

no journal, , 

We have developed new analytical methods for$$^{90}$$Sr (28.79 yr) and $$^{135}$$Cs (2.3x10$$^{6}$$ yr) by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for the further development of the research on the environmental fate of artificial radionuclides$$^{90}$$Sr and $$^{137}$$Cs (30.1 yr). The AMS method enables the analysis of trace amounts of$$^{90}$$Sr and $$^{135}$$Cs with a simple chemical separation procedure. Having a longer half-life $$^{135}$$Cs applies as a proxy for $$^{137}$$Cs. For $$^{90}$$Sr, SrF$$_{2}$$ targets were prepared from radioactive environmental reference materials with known $$^{90}$$Sr concentrations (IAEA) by a chemical separation procedure that takes about two days to complete. $$^{90}$$Sr measured by AMS at VERA, University of Vienna. As a result, a limit of detection of $$<$$0.1 mBq was obtained, which is comparable to the $$beta$$ ray measurement. The detection of $$^{90}$$Sr in environmental samples was also successful, indicating that the $$^{90}$$Sr AMS can apply to environmental samples. On the other hand, there are still some technical challenges in the $$^{135}$$Cs AMS. Therefore, the experimental measurements are in progress.

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