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Journal Articles

Sewage sludge ash contaminated with radiocesium; Solidification with alkaline-reacted metakaolinite (geopolymer) and Portland cement

Kozai, Naofumi; Sato, Junya; Osugi, Takeshi; Shimoyama, Iwao; Sekine, Yurina; Sakamoto, Fuminori; Onuki, Toshihiko

Journal of Hazardous Materials, 416, p.125965_1 - 125965_9, 2021/08

 Times Cited Count:1 Percentile:0(Engineering, Environmental)

Journal Articles

Development of spin-contrast-variation neutron powder diffractometry for extracting the structure factor of hydrogen atoms

Miura, Daisuke*; Kumada, Takayuki; Sekine, Yurina; Motokawa, Ryuhei; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Oba, Yojiro; Ohara, Takashi; Takata, Shinichi; Hiroi, Kosuke; Morikawa, Toshiaki*; et al.

Journal of Applied Crystallography, 54(2), p.454 - 460, 2021/04

 Times Cited Count:0 Percentile:0.02(Chemistry, Multidisciplinary)

We developed a spin-contrast-variation neutron powder diffractometry technique that extracts the structure factor of hydrogen atoms, namely, the contribution of hydrogen atoms to a crystal structure factor. Crystals of L-glutamic acid were dispersed in a dpolystyrene matrix containing 4-methacryloyloxy-2,2,6,6,-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy (TEMPO methacrylate) to polarize their proton spins dynamically. The intensities of the diffraction peaks of the sample changed according to the proton polarization, and the structure factor of the hydrogen atoms was extracted from the proton-polarization dependent intensities. This technique is expected to enable analyses of the structures of hydrogen-containing materials that are difficult to determine with conventional powder diffractometry.

Journal Articles

Carbonated nanohydroxyapatite from bone waste and its potential as a super adsorbent for removal of toxic ions

Sekine, Yurina; Nankawa, Takuya; Yamada, Teppei*; Matsumura, Daiju; Nemoto, Yoshihiro*; Takeguchi, Masaki*; Sugita, Tsuyoshi; Shimoyama, Iwao; Kozai, Naofumi; Morooka, Satoshi

Journal of Environmental Chemical Engineering, 9(2), p.105114_1 - 105114_12, 2021/04

 Times Cited Count:0 Percentile:0(Engineering, Environmental)

Remediating toxic ion contamination is crucial for protecting human health and the environment. This study aimed to provide a powerful strategy for effectively utilizing bone waste from the food production and preparation industries for removal of toxic ions. Here, we show that immersing pig bone in NaHCO$$_{3}$$ solution produced a carbonated nanohydroxyapatites (C-NHAP). The C-NHAP exhibited high adsorptivity for Sr$$^{2+}$$, Cd$$^{2+}$$, Pb$$^{2+}$$, and Cu$$^{2+}$$. The strontium adsorptivity was about 250 and 4,500 times higher than that of normal bone and synthetic HAP, respectively. The C-NHAP is an eco-friendly, high-performance material that is simple to prepare and should be useful for tackling problems of food waste disposal and environmental pollution.

Journal Articles

Introduction to SANS-J and PNO

Kumada, Takayuki; Motokawa, Ryuhei; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Oba, Yojiro; Sekine, Yurina

Hamon, 31(1), p.5 - 6, 2021/02

no abstracts in English

Journal Articles

Eco-friendly carboxymethyl cellulose nanofiber hydrogels prepared via freeze cross-linking and their applications

Sekine, Yurina; Nankawa, Takuya; Yunoki, Shunji*; Sugita, Tsuyoshi; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Yamada, Teppei*

ACS Applied Polymer Materials (Internet), 2(12), p.5482 - 5491, 2020/12

We developed a cross-linking method using freeze concentration and used it to synthesize a new type of carboxymethyl cellulose nanofiber (CMCF) hydrogel with high compressive strength ($$>$$ 80 MPa) and high compressive recoverability. The hydrogels were prepared by adding an aqueous solution of citric acid (CA) to a frozen CMCF sol and then thawing the sol. The reaction between the freeze-concentrated CMCF and CA created a rigid porous structure that reflected the ice crystal structure. Their cross-linked structure has a high stability to compressive stress. Bentonite was immobilized on a CMCF hydrogel by adding bentonite to the CMCF sol before freeze cross-linking. The CMCF-bentonite hydrogel showed high adsorptivity for chemical dyes. The physically cross-linked CMCF hydrogels are non-toxic, metal-free, and simple to prepare, and thus they may be useful as sustainable materials in various fields.

Journal Articles

Soft, skin-interfaced microfluidic systems with integrated immunoassays, fluorometric sensors, and impedance measurement capabilities

Kim, S.*; Lee, B.*; Reeder, J. T.*; Seo, S. H.*; Lee, S.-U.*; Hourlier-Fargette, A.*; Shin, J.*; Sekine, Yurina; Jeong, H.*; Oh, Y. S.*; et al.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 117(45), p.27906 - 27915, 2020/11

 Times Cited Count:9 Percentile:76.81(Multidisciplinary Sciences)

In this study, we present a wireless, battery-free, skin-interfaced microfluidic system that combines lateral flow immunoassay for sweat cortisol assay, fluorometric imaging of glucose and ascorbic acid (vitamin C) assays, and digital tracking of sweat rate using electrodes that measure skin galvanic response. Systematic benchtop testing and on-body field studies on human subjects exercising in a gym environment highlight the key multifunctional features of this platform in tracking the biochemical correlates of physical stress.

Journal Articles

Passive sweat collection and colorimetric analysis of biomarkers relevant to kidney disorders using a soft microfluidic system

Zhang, Y.*; Guo, H.*; Kim, S. B.*; Wu, Y.*; Ostojich, D.*; Park, S. H.*; Wang, X.*; Weng, Z.*; Li, R.*; Bandodkar, A. J.*; et al.

Lab on a Chip, 19(9), p.1545 - 1555, 2019/05

 Times Cited Count:54 Percentile:99.34(Biochemical Research Methods)

This paper introduces two important advances in recently reported classes of soft, skin-interfaced microfluidic systems for sweat capture and analysis: (1) a simple, broadly applicable means for collection of sweat that bypasses requirements for physical/mental exertion or pharmacological stimulation and (2) a set of enzymatic chemistries and colorimetric readout approaches for determining the concentrations of creatinine and urea in sweat, across physiologically relevant ranges. The results allow for routine, non-pharmacological capture of sweat across patient populations, such as infants and the elderly, that cannot be expected to sweat through exercise, and they create potential opportunities in the use of sweat for kidney disease screening/monitoring.

Journal Articles

Root-endophytic Chaetomium cupreum chemically enhances aluminium tolerance in $$Miscanthus sinensis$$ via increasing the aluminium detoxicants, chlorogenic acid and oosporein

Haruma, Toshikatsu*; Yamaji, Keiko*; Ogawa, kazuyoshi*; Masuya, Hayato*; Sekine, Yurina; Kozai, Naofumi

PLOS ONE (Internet), 14(2), p.e0212644_1 - e0212644_16, 2019/02

 Times Cited Count:13 Percentile:87.95(Multidisciplinary Sciences)

Miscanthus sinensis Andersson is a pioneer plant species that grows naturally at mining sites. $$Miscanthus sinensis$$ can detoxify aluminium (Al) by producing phytosiderophores. Root-endophytic Chaetomium cupreum, which produces microbial siderophores, enhances Al tolerance in M. sinensis. We identified the siderophore produced by C. cupreum as oosporein. It was revealed that oosporein could detoxify Al. Inoculation test of C. cupreum onto M. sinensis in acidic mine soil showed that C. cupreum promoted seedling growth, and enhanced Al tolerance.

Journal Articles

Battery-free, skin-interfaced microfluidic/electronic systems for simultaneous electrochemical, colorimetric, and volumetric analysis of sweat

Bandodkar, A. J.*; Gutruf, P.*; Choi, J.*; Lee, K.-H.*; Sekine, Yurina; Reeder, J. T.*; Jeang, W. J.*; Aranyosi, A. J.*; Lee, S. P.*; Model, J. B.*; et al.

Science Advances (Internet), 5(1), p.eaav3294_1 - eaav3294_15, 2019/01

 Times Cited Count:194 Percentile:99.9(Multidisciplinary Sciences)

Interest in advanced wearable technologies increasingly extends beyond systems for biophysical measurements to those that enable continuous, non-invasive monitoring of biochemical markers in biofluids. Here, we introduce battery-free, wireless microelectronic platforms that perform sensing via schemes inspired by the operation of biofuel cells. Combining these systems in a magnetically releasable manner with chrono-sampling microfluidic networks that incorporate assays based on colorimetric sensing yields thin, flexible, lightweight, skin-interfaced technologies with broad functionality in sweat analysis. A demonstration device allows simultaneous monitoring of sweat rate/loss, along with quantitative measurements of pH and of lactate, glucose and chloride concentrations using biofuel cell and colorimetric approaches.

Journal Articles

Nanoscopic structural investigation of nanogels for drug delivery application

Sekine, Yurina

Shiki, 41, P. 4, 2018/12

This article described the detailed structure of a nanogel formed by self-association of polysaccharides determined by contrast variation small-angle neutron scattering.

Journal Articles

Soft, skin-interfaced microfluidic systems with wireless, battery-free electronics for digital, real-time tracking of sweat loss and electrolyte composition

Kim, S. B.*; Lee, K.-H.*; Raj, M. S.*; Reeder, J. T.*; Koo, J.*; Hourlier-Fargette, A.*; Bandodkar, A. J.*; Won, S. M.*; Sekine, Yurina; Choi, J.*; et al.

Small, 14(45), p.1802876_1 - 1802876_9, 2018/11

 Times Cited Count:41 Percentile:92.78(Chemistry, Multidisciplinary)

Excretion of sweat from eccrine glands is a dynamic physiological process that varies with body position, activity level, and health status. Information content embodied in sweat rate and chemistry can be used to assess health status and athletic performance. This paper presents a thin, miniaturized, skin-interfaced microfluidic technology that includes a reusable, battery-free electronics module for measuring sweat conductivity and rate in real-time using wireless power from and data communication with capabilities in near field communications (NFC). Systematic studies of these combined microfluidic/electronic systems, accurate correlations of measurements performed with them to those of laboratory standard instrumentation, and field tests on human subjects establish the key operational features and their utility in sweat analytics.

Journal Articles

A Fluorometric skin-interfaced microfluidic device and smartphone imaging module for ${{it in situ}}$ quantitative analysis of sweat chemistry

Sekine, Yurina; Kim, S. B.*; Zhang, Y.*; Bandodkar, A. J.*; Xu, S.*; Choi, J.*; Irie, Masahiro*; Ray, T. R.*; Kohli, P.*; Kozai, Naofumi; et al.

Lab on a Chip, 18(15), p.2178 - 2186, 2018/08

The rich composition of solutes and metabolites in sweat and its relative ease of collection upon excretion from skin pores make this class of biofluid an attractive candidate for point of care analysis. Here, we present a complementary approach that exploits fluorometric sensing modalities integrated into a soft, skin-interfaced microfluidic system which, when paired with a simple smartphone-based imaging module, allows for in-situ measurement of important biomarkers in sweat. A network array of microchannels and a collection of microreservoirs pre-filled with fluorescent probes that selectively react with target analytes in sweat (e.g. probes), enable quantitative, rapid analysis. Field studies on human subjects demonstrate the ability to measure the concentrations of chloride, sodium and zinc in sweat, with accuracy that matches that of conventional laboratory techniques.

Journal Articles

Super-absorbent polymer valves and colorimetric chemistries for time-sequenced discrete sampling and chloride analysis of sweat via skin-mounted soft microfluidics

Kim, S. B.*; Zhang, Y.*; Won, S. M.*; Bandodkar, A. J.*; Sekine, Yurina; Xue, Y.*; Koo, J.*; Harshman, S. W.*; Martin, J. A.*; Park, J. M.*; et al.

Small, 14(12), p.1703334_1 - 1703334_11, 2018/03

 Times Cited Count:47 Percentile:94.29(Chemistry, Multidisciplinary)

Journal Articles

Experience note of John Rogers Laboratory in Northwestern University

Sekine, Yurina

Hoshasen To Sangyo, (143), p.51 - 54, 2017/12

The author reports experience note of John Rogers laboratory in Northwestern University from January in 2017.

Journal Articles

Calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite as a potential sorbent for strontium

Sekine, Yurina; Motokawa, Ryuhei; Kozai, Naofumi; Onuki, Toshihiko; Matsumura, Daiju; Tsuji, Takuya; Kawasaki, Riku*; Akiyoshi, Kazunari*

Scientific Reports (Internet), 7(1), p.2064_1 - 2064_8, 2017/05

 Times Cited Count:23 Percentile:76.47(Multidisciplinary Sciences)

A calcium (Ca)-deficient hydroxyapatite was investigated for its potential to remove Sr$$^{2+}$$ from environmentally relevant water. We conducted sorption tests on solutions having Mg$$^{2+}$$ and Ca$$^{2+}$$ as competing cations at the Sr$$^{2+}$$ concentration of 0.05 mmol/L. The Ca-deficient hydroxyapatite maintained its high Sr$$^{2+}$$ sorption ratio: the sorption ratio was above 80% in the presence of Mg$$^{2+}$$ and Ca$$^{2+}$$ in the concentrations between 0.1 to 1.0 mmol/L, whereas stoichiometric hydroxyapatite showed a lower ratio even in the presence of small amounts of Mg$$^{2+}$$ and Ca$$^{2+}$$. The bonding states of Sr$$^{2+}$$ onto the Ca-deficient hydroxyapatite were evaluated by extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurements. The results indicated that there are specific sorption sites in Ca-deficient hydroxyapatite where Sr$$^{2+}$$ could be stably and preferentially immobilized.

Journal Articles

Nanoscopic structural investigation of physically cross-linked nanogels formed from self-associating polymers

Sekine, Yurina; Endo, Hitoshi*; Iwase, Hiroki*; Takeda, Shigeo*; Mukai, Sadaatsu*; Fukazawa, Hiroshi; Littrell, K. C.*; Sasaki, Yoshihiro*; Akiyoshi, Kazunari*

Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 120(46), p.11996 - 12002, 2016/11

 Times Cited Count:9 Percentile:32.16(Chemistry, Physical)

The detailed structure of a nanogel formed by self-association of cholesterol-bearing pullulans (CHP) was determined by contrast variation small-angle neutron scattering. The decomposition of scattering intensities into partial scattering functions of each CHP nanogel component, i.e., pullulan, cholesterol, and the cross-term between the pullulan and the cholesterol allows us to investigate the internal structure of the nanogel. The effective spherical radius of the skeleton formed by pullulan chains was found to be about 8.1 nm. In the CHP nanogel, there are about 19 cross-linking points where a cross-linking point is formed by aggregation of trimer cholesterol molecules with the spatially inhomogeneous distribution of the mass fractal dimension of 2.6. The average radius of the partial chains can also be determined to be 1.7 nm. As the result, the complex structure of the nanogels is coherently revealed at the nanoscopical level.

Journal Articles

Neutron diffraction of ice and water in hydrogels

Sekine, Yurina; Kobayashi, Riki*; Chi, S.*; Fernandez-Baca, J. A.*; Suzuya, Kentaro; Fujisaki, Fumika*; Ikeda, Kazutaka*; Otomo, Toshiya*; Fukazawa, Tomoko*; Yamauchi, Hiroki; et al.

JPS Conference Proceedings (Internet), 8, p.033009_1 - 033009_6, 2015/09

Neutron diffraction profiles of low-D$$_{2}$$O-content poly-N,N,-dimethylacrylamide (PDMAA) hydrogels were measured from 100 to 300 K to investigate the structure and properties of water in hydrogels. A broad diffraction observed at temperatures lower than 220 K indicates the existence of amorphous ice in the hydrogels at low temperatures. During the heating process, diffraction peaks from ice crystals appear in the profiles. These peaks indicate that cubic ice and hexagonal ice exist at T $$geq$$ 220 K. We refined the structure parameters of these ices in the hydrogel, which indicate the existence of low-density ice in the hydrogel.

Journal Articles

Fly to the world Episode 1

Sekine, Yurina

Hamon, 25(2), P. 179, 2015/05

no abstracts in English

Journal Articles

Dependence of structure of polymer side chain on water structure in hydrogels

Sekine, Yurina; Takagi, Hajime*; Sudo, Sayoko*; Kajiwara, Yutaro*; Fukazawa, Hiroshi; Fukazawa, Tomoko*

Polymer, 55(24), p.6320 - 6324, 2014/11

 Times Cited Count:14 Percentile:53.72(Polymer Science)

To investigate the effects of structure of polymer side chains on structure of water in hydrogels, Raman spectra of polyacrylamide (PAA) and poly-$$N$$,$$N$$-dimethylacrylamide (PDMAA) hydrogels were measured. PAA and PDMAA have similar chemical structures, except for the side chain structure. The result shows that the frequency of the OH stretching mode for the PAA hydrogel decreases as the water content decreases, while that for the PDMAA hydrogel increases. We conclude that most of the bound water molecules in the PAA hydrogel form four strong hydrogen bonds with the hydrophilic groups in the side chain of PAA, whereas those in the PDMAA hydrogel form weak hydrogen bonds with surrounding water molecules. The water structure is an important factor governing the physical and chemical properties of gel materials.

Journal Articles

Neutron diffraction of ice in hydrogels

Sekine, Yurina; Fukazawa, Tomoko*; Aizawa, Mamoru*; Kobayashi, Riki*; Chi, S.*; Fernandez-Baca, J. A.*; Yamauchi, Hiroki; Fukazawa, Hiroshi

Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 118(47), p.13453 - 13457, 2014/08

 Times Cited Count:1 Percentile:2.1(Chemistry, Physical)

Neutron diffraction patterns for deuterated poly-$$N$$,$$N$$,-dimethylacrylamide (PDMAA) hydrogels were measured from 10 to 300 K to investigate the structure and properties of water in the gels. Diffraction peaks observed below 250 K indicate the existence of ice in the hydrogels. Some diffraction peaks from the ice are at lower diffraction angles than those in ordinary hexagonal ice (Ih). These shifts in peaks indicate that the lattice constants of the $$a$$ and $$c$$ axes in the ice are about 0.29% and 0.3% higher than those in ice Ih, respectively. The results show that bulk low-density ice can exist in PDMAA hydrogels. The distortions in the lattice structure of ice imply significant interactions between water molecules and the surrounding polymer chains, which play an important role in the chemical and mechanical properties of the hydrogel.

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