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Journal Articles

Precise determination of $$^{12}_{Lambda}$$C level structure by $$gamma$$-ray spectroscopy

Hosomi, Kenji; Ma, Y.*; Ajimura, Shuhei*; Aoki, Kanae*; Dairaku, Seishi*; Fu, Y.*; Fujioka, Hiroyuki*; Futatsukawa, Kenta*; Imoto, Wataru*; Kakiguchi, Yutaka*; et al.

Progress of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Internet), 2015(8), p.081D01_1 - 081D01_8, 2015/08

 Times Cited Count:13 Percentile:70.14(Physics, Multidisciplinary)

Level structure of the $$^{12}_{Lambda}$$C hypernucleus was precisely determined by means of $$gamma$$-ray spectroscopy. We identified four $$gamma$$-ray transitions via the $$^{12}$$C$$(pi^{+},K^{+}gamma)$$ reaction using a germanium detector array, Hyperball2. The spacing of the ground-state doublet $$(2^{-}, 1^{-}_{1})$$ was measured to be $$161.5pm0.3$$(stat)$$pm0.3$$ (syst)keV from the direct $$M1$$ transition. Excitation energies of the $$1^{-}_{2}$$ and $$1^{-}_{3}$$ states were measured to be $$2832pm3pm4$$, keV and $$6050pm8pm7$$, keV, respectively. The obtained level energies provide definitive references for the reaction spectroscopy of $$Lambda$$ hypernuclei.

Journal Articles

NHEJ repair rather than HR repair is the primary function to target to enhance radiosensitization at high LET values

Takahashi, Akihisa*; Kubo, Makoto*; Igarashi, Chie*; Yoshida, Yukari*; Funayama, Tomoo; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Nakano, Takashi*

JAEA-Review 2014-050, JAEA Takasaki Annual Report 2013, P. 82, 2015/03

DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by ionizing radiation pose a major threat to cell survival. The cell can respond to the presence of DSBs, through two major repair pathways: Homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). Higher levels of cell death are induced by high-LET radiation when compared to low-LET radiation, even at the same doses because of less effective or more inefficient DNA repair. In this study, we examine the effects of radiation with different LET values on DNA DSB repair and radiosensitivity. Wild-type cells and HR deficient (but NHEJ proficient) cells exhibited the high RBE values at LET values of 108 keV/$$mu$$ m. The RBE value for each cell type decreased with increasing LET values over 200 keV/$$mu$$m. Although NHEJ proficient cells had an almost constant SER value, NHEJ deficient cells showed a high SER value when compared to NHEJ proficient cells, even with increasing LET values.

Journal Articles

Nonhomologous end-joining repair plays a more important role than homologous recombination repair in defining radiosensitivity after exposure to high-LET radiation

Takahashi, Akihisa*; Kubo, Makoto*; Ma, H.*; Nakagawa, Akiko*; Yoshida, Yukari*; Isono, Mayu*; Kanai, Tatsuaki*; Ono, Tatsuya*; Furusawa, Yoshiya*; Funayama, Tomoo; et al.

Radiation Research, 182(3), p.338 - 344, 2014/09

 Times Cited Count:38 Percentile:87.69(Biology)

To clarify whether high-LET radiation inhibits all repair pathways or specifically one repair pathway, studies were designed to examine the effects of radiation with different LET values on DNA DSB repair and radiosensitivity. Embryonic fibroblasts bearing repair gene KO were exposed to X rays, carbon-, iron-, neon- and argon-ion beams. Cell survival was measured with colony-forming assays. The sensitization enhancement ratio (SER) values were calculated using the 10% survival dose of wild-type cells and repair-deficient cells. Cellular radiosensitivity was listed in descending order: double-KO cells $$>$$ NHEJ-KO cells $$>$$ HR-KO cells $$>$$ wild-type cells. Although HR-KO cells had an almost constant SER value, NHEJ-KO cells showed a high-SER value when compared to HR-KO cells, even with increasing LET values. These results suggest that with carbon-ion therapy, targeting NHEJ repair yields higher radiosensitivity than targeting homologous recombination repair.

Journal Articles

Increase in cell motility by carbon ion irradiation via the Rho signaling pathway and its inhibition by the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 in lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells

Murata, Kazutoshi*; Noda, Shinei*; Oike, Takahiro*; Takahashi, Akihisa*; Yoshida, Yukari*; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki*; Ono, Tatsuya*; Funayama, Tomoo; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Takahashi, Takeo*; et al.

Journal of Radiation Research, 55(4), p.658 - 664, 2014/07

 Times Cited Count:15 Percentile:60.96(Biology)

The effect of carbon ion irradiation on cell motility through the Rho signaling pathway in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 was studied. At 48 h after irradiation, the cell motility of A549 cells became significantly greater, and the formation of protrusions significantly increased in cells irradiated with carbon ion. The observed increase in cell motility due to carbon ion irradiation was similar to that observed due to X-ray irradiation. Western-blot analysis showed that carbon ion irradiation increased P-MLC2-S19 expression compared with in unirradiated controls, while total MLC2 expression was unchanged. Exposure to a non-toxic concentration of Y-27632, a specific inhibitor of ROCK, reduced the expression of P-MLC2-S19 after C-ion irradiation, resulting in a significant reduction in migration. These data suggest that carbon irradiation increases cell motility in A549 cells via the Rho signaling pathway and that ROCK inhibition reduces that effect.

Journal Articles

Growth temperature dependence of strain relaxation during InGaAs/GaAs(0 0 1) heteroepitaxy

Sasaki, Takuo*; Suzuki, Hidetoshi*; Sai, Akihisa*; Takahashi, Masamitsu; Fujikawa, Seiji; Kamiya, Itaru*; Oshita, Yoshio*; Yamaguchi, Masafumi*

Journal of Crystal Growth, 323(1), p.13 - 16, 2011/05

 Times Cited Count:17 Percentile:82.2(Crystallography)

Growth temperature dependence of strain relaxation during In$$_{0.12}]$$Ga$$_{0.88}$$As/GaAs(001) molecular beam epitaxy was studied by in situ X-ray reciprocal space mapping. Evolution of the residual strain and crystal quality for the InGaAs film was obtained as a function of film thickness at growth temperatures of 420, 445 and 477 $$^{circ}$$C. In the early stages of strain relaxation, it was found that evolution of the residual strain and crystal quality was dependent on the growth temperature. In order to discuss this observation quantitatively, the strain relaxation model was proposed based on the Dodson-Tsao kinetic model, and its validity was demonstrated by good agreement with the experimental residual strain. Additionally, rate coefficients reflecting dislocation motions during strain relaxation were obtained as a function of growth temperature and strain relaxation was discussed in terms of the thermally active dislocation motion.

Journal Articles

Real-time observation of anisotropic strain relaxation by three-dimensional reciprocal space mapping during InGaAs/GaAs(001) growth

Suzuki, Hidetoshi*; Sasaki, Takuo*; Sai, Akihisa*; Oshita, Yoshio*; Kamiya, Itaru*; Yamaguchi, Masafumi*; Takahashi, Masamitsu; Fujikawa, Seiji

Applied Physics Letters, 97(4), p.041906_1 - 041906_3, 2010/07

 Times Cited Count:30 Percentile:76.37(Physics, Applied)

Journal Articles

Recent advances in the biology of heavy-ion cancer therapy

Hamada, Nobuyuki*; Imaoka, Tatsuhiko*; Masunaga, Shinichiro*; Ogata, Toshiyuki*; Okayasu, Ryuichi*; Takahashi, Akihisa*; Kato, Takamitsu*; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Onishi, Takeo*; Ono, Koji*; et al.

Journal of Radiation Research, 51(4), p.365 - 383, 2010/07

 Times Cited Count:102 Percentile:91.64(Biology)

Journal Articles

In situ study of strain relaxation mechanisms during lattice-mismatched InGaAs/GaAs growth by X-ray reciprocal space mapping

Sasaki, Takuo*; Suzuki, Hidetoshi*; Sai, Akihisa*; Takahashi, Masamitsu; Fujikawa, Seiji; Oshita, Yoshio*; Yamaguchi, Masafumi*

Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings, Vol.1268, 6 Pages, 2010/05

 Times Cited Count:0 Percentile:0.01

Journal Articles

${it In situ}$ real-time X-Ray reciprocal space mapping during InGaAs/GaAs growth for understanding strain relaxation mechanisms

Sasaki, Takuo*; Suzuki, Hidetoshi*; Sai, Akihisa*; Lee, J.-H.*; Takahashi, Masamitsu; Fujikawa, Seiji; Arafune, Koji*; Kamiya, Itaru*; Oshita, Yoshio*; Yamaguchi, Masafumi*

Applied Physics Express, 2, p.085501_1 - 085501_3, 2009/07

 Times Cited Count:34 Percentile:78.52(Physics, Applied)

Journal Articles

Vanguards of paradigm shift in radiation biology; Radiation-induced adaptive and bystander responses

Matsumoto, Hideki*; Hamada, Nobuyuki*; Takahashi, Akihisa*; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Onishi, Takeo*

Journal of Radiation Research, 48(2), p.97 - 106, 2007/03

 Times Cited Count:116 Percentile:91.55(Biology)

The risks of low dose ionizing irradiation ($$<$$ 100 mSv) have been estimated using a linear no-threshold model by extrapolating from data obtained after high dose irradiation. The validity of this dose-response model is, however, controversial because evidence accumulated for over the past decade has shown that response of living organisms including humans to low dose/low dose-rate radiation is different from that to high dose/high dose-rate radiation. In another words, findings that cannot be explained by the classical "target theory" of radiobiology have accumulated. The radiation-induced adaptive response, bystander effects, low-dose radio-hypersensitivity, and genomic instability are specifically observed in response to low dose/low dose-rate radiation, and underpinnings of these responses often involve biochemical/molecular signals responding to targeted and non-targeted events. Recently, interrelations between the radioadaptive and bystander responses have been increasingly reported. We review observations supporting the existence of the latter two phenomena, and discuss the possible link between them from the aspect of production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

Journal Articles

Analysis of molecular mechanisms for radiation-induced bystander effects using heavy ion microbeams

Matsumoto, Hideki*; Hatashita, Masanori*; Takahashi, Akihisa*; Hamada, Nobuyuki*; Wada, Seiichi*; Funayama, Tomoo; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Kakizaki, Takehiko; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

JAEA-Review 2006-042, JAEA Takasaki Annual Report 2005, P. 111, 2007/02

Oral presentation

Analysis of mechanisms for radiation-induced bystander effect using heavy-ion microbeams

Matsumoto, Hideki*; Hatashita, Masanori*; Takahashi, Akihisa*; Hamada, Nobuyuki*; Wada, Seiichi*; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Funayama, Tomoo; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Kakizaki, Takehiko

no journal, , 

no abstracts in English

Oral presentation

Increase in cell motility by carbon ion irradiation via the Rho signaling pathway and its inhibition by the ROCK inhibitor Y-27632

Murata, Kazutoshi*; Noda, Shinei*; Oike, Takahiro*; Takahashi, Akihisa*; Yoshida, Yukari*; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki*; Ono, Tatsuya*; Funayama, Tomoo; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Takahashi, Takeo*; et al.

no journal, , 

This study aimed to investigate the effect of carbon ion (C-ion) irradiation on cell motility through the ras homolog gene family member (Rho) signaling pathway in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. Cell motility was assessed by a wound-healing assay, and the formation of cell protrusions was evaluated by F-actin staining. Cell viability was examined by the WST-1 assay. The expression of myosin light chain 2 (MLC2) and the phosphorylation of MLC2 at Ser19 (P MLC2-S19) were analyzed by Western blot. The data suggest that C-ion irradiation increases cell motility in A549 cells via the Rho signaling pathway and that ROCK inhibition reduces that effect.

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