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Journal Articles

4-Methylumbelliferone administration enhances radiosensitivity of human fibrosarcoma by intercellular communication

Saga, Ryo*; Matsuya, Yusuke; Takahashi, Rei*; Hasegawa, Kazuki*; Date, Hiroyuki*; Hosokawa, Yoichiro*

Scientific Reports (Internet), 11(1), p.8258_1 - 8258_10, 2021/04

 Times Cited Count:0 Percentile:0(Multidisciplinary Sciences)

Hyaluronan synthesis inhibitor 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) is a candidate of radiosensitizers in X-ray therapy. The curative effects under such 4-MU administration have been investigated in vitro; however, the radiosensitizing mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we investigated the radiosensitizing effects under 4-MU treatment from cell experiments and model estimations. We generated experimental surviving fractions of human fibrosarcoma cells (HT1080) after 4-MU treatment combined with X-ray irradiation. Meanwhilst, we also modelled the pharmacological effects of 4-MU treatment and theoretically analyzed the synergetic effects between 4-MU treatment and X-ray irradiation. The results show that the enhancement of cell killing by 4-MU treatment is the greatest in the intermediate dose range of around 4 Gy, which indicates the involvement of intercellular communication. In addition, the oxidative stress level, which leads to DNA damage induction, significantly increased under 4-MU treatment, and the radiosensitization by 4-MU can be suppressed by the inhibitors for intercellular communication. These findings suggest that the synergetic effects between 4-MU treatment and irradiation are predominantly attributed to intercellular communication and provide more efficient tumour control than conventional X-ray therapy.

Journal Articles

Origin of magnetovolume effect in a cobaltite

Miao, P.*; Tan, Z.*; Lee, S. H.*; Ishikawa, Yoshihisa*; Torii, Shuki*; Yonemura, Masao*; Koda, Akihiro*; Komatsu, Kazuki*; Machida, Shinichi*; Sano, Asami; et al.

Physical Review B, 103(9), p.094302_1 - 094302_18, 2021/03

 Times Cited Count:0 Percentile:0(Materials Science, Multidisciplinary)

The layered perovskite PrBaCo$$_{2}$$O$$_{5.5}$$ demonstrates a strong negative thermal expansion (NTE) which holds potential for being fabricated into composites with zero thermal expansion. The NTE was found to be intimately associated with the spontaneous magnetic ordering, known as magneto-volume effect (MVE). Here we report with compelling evidences that the continuous-like MVE in PrBaCo$$_{2}$$O$$_{5.5}$$ is intrinsically of discontinuous character, originating from an magnetoelectric transition from an antiferromagnetic insulating large-volume (AFILV) phase to a ferromagnetic less-insulating small-volume (FLISV) phase. Furthermore, the magnetoelectric effect (ME) shows high sensitivity to multiple external stimuli such as temperature, carrier doping, hydrostatic pressure, magnetic field etc. In contrast to the well-known ME such as colossal magnetoresistance and multi-ferroic effect which involve symmetry breaking of crystal structure, the ME in the cobaltite is purely isostructural. Our discovery provides a new path way to realizing the ME as well as the NTE, which may find applications in new techniques.

Journal Articles

Morphological reproductive characteristics of testes and fertilization capacity of cryopreserved sperm after the Fukushima accident in raccoon (${it Procyon lotor}$)

Komatsu, Kazuki*; Iwasaki, Tsugumi*; Murata, Kosuke*; Yamashiro, Hideaki*; Goh, V. S. T.*; Nakayama, Ryo*; Fujishima, Yohei*; Ono, Takumi*; Kino, Yasushi*; Shimizu, Yoshinaka*; et al.

Reproduction in Domestic Animals, 56(3), p.484 - 497, 2021/03

We have established an archive system of livestock and wild animals from the surrounding ex-evacuation zone. Wildlife within the alert zone have been exposed to low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation for a long and continuous time. In this study, we analysed the morphological characteristics of the testes and in vitro fertilization (IVF) capacity of cryopreserved sperm of raccoons from the ex-evacuation zone of the FDNPP accident. This study revealed that the chronic and LDR radiation exposure associated with the FDNPP accident had no adverse effect on the reproductive characteristics and functions of male raccoons.

Journal Articles

Reactor physics experiment in a graphite-moderation system for HTGR

Fukaya, Yuji; Goto, Minoru; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Nakajima, Kunihiro*; Takahashi, Kazuki*; Sakon, Atsushi*; Sano, Tadafumi*; Hashimoto, Kengo*

EPJ Web of Conferences, 247, p.09017_1 - 09017_8, 2021/02

The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) started the Research and Development (R&D) to improve nuclear prediction techniques for High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs). The objectives are to introduce a generalized bias factor method to avoid full mock-up experiment for the first commercial HTGR and to introduce reactor noise analysis to High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) experiment to observe subcriticality. To achieve the objectives, the reactor core of graphite-moderation system named B7/4"G2/8"p8EUNU+3/8"p38EU(1) was newly composed in the B-rack of Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA). The core is composed of the fuel assembly, driver fuel assembly, graphite reflector, and polyethylene reflector. The fuel assembly is composed of enriched uranium plate, natural uranium plate and graphite plates to realize the average fuel enrichment of HTTR and it's spectrum. However, driver fuel assembly is necessary to achieve the criticality with the small-sized core. The core plays a role of the reference core of the bias factor method, and the reactor noise was measured to develop the noise analysis scheme. In this study, the overview of the criticality experiments is reported. The reactor configuration with graphite moderation system is rare case in the KUCA experiments, and this experiment is expected to contribute not only for an HTGR development but also for other types of a reactor in the graphite moderation system such as a molten salt reactor development.

Journal Articles

Reactor noise analysis for a graphite-moderated and -reflected core in KUCA

Sakon, Atsushi*; Nakajima, Kunihiro*; Takahashi, Kazuki*; Hohara, Shinya*; Sano, Tadafumi*; Fukaya, Yuji; Hashimoto, Kengo*

EPJ Web of Conferences, 247, p.09009_1 - 09009_8, 2021/02

In graphite-reflected thermal reactors, even a detector placed far from fuel region may detect a certain degree of the correlation amplitude. This is because mean free path of neutrons in graphite is longer than that in water or polyethylene. The objective of this study is experimentally to confirm a high flexibility of neutron detector placement in graphite reflector for reactor noise analysis. The present reactor noise analysis was carried out in a graphite-moderated and -reflected thermal core in Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA). BF$$_{3}$$ proportional neutron counters (1" dia.) were placed in graphite reflector region, where the counters were separated by about 35cm and 30cm -thick graphite from the core, respectively. At a critical state and subcritical states, time-sequence signal data from these counters were acquired and analyzed by a fast Fourier transform (FFT) analyzer, to obtain power spectral density in frequency domain. The auto-power spectral density obtained from the counters far from the core contained a significant degree of correlated component. A least-squares fit of a familiar formula to the auto-power spectral density data was made to determine the prompt-neutron decay constant. The decay constant was 63.3$$pm$$14.5 [1/s] in critical state. The decay constant determined from the cross-power spectral density and coherence function data between the two counters also had a consistent value. It is confirmed that reactor noise analysis is possible using a detector placed at about 35cm far from the core, as we expected.

Journal Articles

Reactor physics experiment in a graphite-moderation system for HTGR

Fukaya, Yuji; Goto, Minoru; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Nakajima, Kunihiro*; Takahashi, Kazuki*; Sakon, Atsushi*; Sano, Tadafumi*; Hashimoto, Kengo*

Proceedings of International Conference on the Physics of Reactors; Transition To A Scalable Nuclear Future (PHYSOR 2020) (USB Flash Drive), 8 Pages, 2020/03

The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) started the Research and Development (R&D) to improve nuclear prediction techniques for High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs). The objectives are to introduce a generalized bias factor method to avoid full mock-up experiment for the first commercial HTGR and to introduce reactor noise analysis to High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) experiment to observe subcriticality. To achieve the objectives, the reactor core of graphite-moderation system named B7/4"G2/8"p8EUNU+3/8"p38EU(1) was newly composed in the B-rack of Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA). The core is composed of the fuel assembly, driver fuel assembly, graphite reflector, and polyethylene reflector. The fuel assembly is composed of enriched uranium plate, natural uranium plate and graphite plates to realize the average fuel enrichment of HTTR and it's spectrum. However, driver fuel assembly is necessary to achieve the criticality with the small-sized core. The core plays a role of the reference core of the bias factor method, and the reactor noise was measured to develop the noise analysis scheme. In this study, the overview of the criticality experiments is reported. The reactor configuration with graphite moderation system is rare case in the KUCA experiments, and this experiment is expected to contribute not only for an HTGR development but also for other types of a reactor in the graphite moderation system such as a molten salt reactor development.

Journal Articles

Analysis of the high-dose-range radioresistance of prostate cancer cells, including cancer stem cells, based on a stochastic model

Saga, Ryo*; Matsuya, Yusuke; Takahashi, Rei*; Hasegawa, Kazuki*; Date, Hiroyuki*; Hosokawa, Yoichiro*

Journal of Radiation Research, 60(3), p.298 - 307, 2019/05

 Times Cited Count:13 Percentile:87.98(Biology)

In radiotherapy, it is recognized that cancer stem cells (CSCs) in tumor tissue shows radio-resistance. However, the relationship between content percentage of the CSCs and dose-response curve on cell survival remain unclear. In this study, we developed a stochastic model considering progeny cells and stem cells, and investigated the impact of stem cells on radio-sensitivity. From the flow-cytometric analysis (cell experiments), the content percentage of stem cells was 3.2% or less which agreed well with the model estimation from the cell survival curve. Based on the verification, it is suggested that cell survival in high-dose range is largely affected by the CSCs. In addition, regarding the sub-population of stem cells, the present model well reproduces the dose response on lethal lesions to DNA comparing with the conventional LQ model. This outcome indicates that the stem cells must be considered for describing the dose-response curve in wide dose range.

Journal Articles

Study on use of superconducting magnet and first inelastic neutron scattering experiment under magnetic field at 4SEASONS spectrometer

Kajimoto, Ryoichi; Ishikado, Motoyuki*; Kira, Hiroshi*; Kaneko, Koji; Nakamura, Mitsutaka; Kamazawa, Kazuya*; Inamura, Yasuhiro; Ikeuchi, Kazuhiko*; Iida, Kazuki*; Murai, Naoki; et al.

Physica B; Condensed Matter, 556, p.26 - 30, 2019/03

BB2018-0570.pdf:2.17MB

 Times Cited Count:2 Percentile:22.21(Physics, Condensed Matter)

Journal Articles

Status report of the chopper spectrometer 4SEASONS

Kajimoto, Ryoichi; Nakamura, Mitsutaka; Inamura, Yasuhiro; Kamazawa, Kazuya*; Ikeuchi, Kazuhiko*; Iida, Kazuki*; Ishikado, Motoyuki*; Murai, Naoki; Kira, Hiroshi*; Nakatani, Takeshi; et al.

Journal of Physics; Conference Series, 1021(1), p.012030_1 - 012030_6, 2018/06

BB2016-1727.pdf:0.39MB

 Times Cited Count:3 Percentile:95.16

Journal Articles

Study on heat transfer mechanism elucidation during pool nucleate boiling by measuring instantaneous surface temperature distribution with infrared radiation camera

Koizumi, Yasuo; Takahashi, Kazuki*; Uesawa, Shinichiro; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Takase, Kazuyuki

Dai-52-Kai Nihon Dennetsu Shimpojiumu Koen Rombunshu (CD-ROM), P. 2, 2015/06

Pool nucleate boiling heat transfer experiments were performed for water at 0.101 MPa to examine the elementary process of the nucleate boiling. The copper printed circuit board of a 1.57 mm thick bakelite plate coated with a 0.035 mm thick copper membrane was used for a heat transfer surface. The size of the heat transfer surface was 10 mm $$times$$ 10 mm. direct current was supplied to it to heat it up. The bakelite plate of the backside of the copper layer was taken by 7 mm $$times$$ 10 mm. The instantaneous variation of the backside temperature of the heat transfer surface was measured with an infrared radiation camera. The time and the space resolution of the infrared cameras used in experiments were 120 Hz and 0.315 mm $$times$$ 0.315 mm, respectively. Surface temperatures just before the burn-out measured with 120 Hz suggest that the surface temperature was steadily low at a large part of the heat transfer surface. A small hot-dry area came out at the critical heat flux condition. Then, this small hot-dry area iterated to expand and shrink and gradually grew. Other area was still wetted and kept at low temperature. Eventually the small hot-dry area started to grow continuously and a whole part of the heat transfer surface became hot-dry to reach the physical burn-out. The heat transfer surface was divided into two large areas; the hot-dry area and the low-temperature wetted area until the physical burn-out. The local surface heat flux variation derived from measured surface temperature variation clearly illustrated that the boundary between the dried area and the wetted area moved back and forth and the dried arear gradually grew to reach physical bourn-out at the critical heat flux condition.

Journal Articles

Study on heat transfer surface temperature variation during pool nucleate boiling by measuring instantaneous surface temperature distribution with infrared radiation camera

Koizumi, Yasuo; Takahashi, Kazuki*; Uesawa, Shinichiro; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Takase, Kazuyuki

Proceedings of 9th International Conference on Boiling and Condensation Heat Transfer (Boiling & Condensation 2015) (DVD-ROM), 10 Pages, 2015/04

Pool nucleate boiling heat transfer experiments were performed for water at 0.101 MPa to examine the elementary process of the nucleate boiling. The copper printed circuit board of a 1.57 mm thick Bakelite plate coated with a 0.035 mm thick copper membrane was used for a heat transfer surface. The size of the heat transfer surface was 10 mm $$times$$ 10 mm. Direct current was supplied to it to heat it up. The Bakelite plate of the backside of the copper layer was taken by 7 mm $$times$$ 10 mm. The instantaneous variation of the backside temperature of the heat transfer surface was measured with an infrared radiation camera. The time and the space resolution of the infrared cameras used in experiments were 120 Hz and 0.315 mm $$times$$ 0.315 mm, respectively. Surface temperatures just before the burn-out measured with 120 Hz suggest that the surface temperature was steadily low at a large part of the heat transfer surface. A small hot-dry area came out at the critical heat flux condition. Then, this small hot-dry area iterated to expand and shrink and gradually grew. Other area was still wetted and kept at low temperature. Eventually the small hot-dry area started to grow continuously and a whole part of the heat transfer surface became hot-dry to reach the physical burn-out. The heat transfer surface was divided into two large areas; the hot-dry area and the low-temperature-wetted area until the physical burn-out. The local surface heat flux variation derived from measured surface temperature variation clearly illustrated that the boundary between the dried area and the wetted area moved back and forth and the dried arear gradually grew to reach physical bourn-out at the critical heat flux condition.

Journal Articles

Introduction to radioactive waste; Management of radioactive waste from operation and decommissioning of nuclear and other facilities, 2; Perspective radioactive waste management

Akiyama, Kazuki; Takahashi, Masanori; Tsukamoto, Masaki*; Miyauchi, Yoshihiro*; Wada, Hiroshi*

Nihon Genshiryoku Gakkai-Shi ATOMO$$Sigma$$, 56(10), p.656 - 660, 2014/10

This report shows the yield of low-level radioactive wastes and high-level radioactive wastes at the nuclear power plant and reprocessing plant, and those detailed managements are reported.

Journal Articles

Study on nucleate boiling heat transfer by measuring instantaneous surface temperature distribution by infrared radiation camera

Koizumi, Yasuo; Takahashi, Kazuki*

Proceedings of 15th International Heat Transfer Conference (IHTC 2014) (USB Flash Drive), 13 Pages, 2014/08

Pool nucleate boiling heat transfer experiments were performed for water at 0.101 MPa to examine the elementary process of the nucleate boiling. Heat transfer surface was made from a copper printed circuit board. Direct current was supplied to heat it up. The Bakelite plate of the backside of a copper layer was taken off at the center portion of the heat transfer surface to expose the back side of the copper layer. The instantaneous variation of the backside temperature of the heat transfer surface was measured with an infrared radiation camera. Bubble behavior was recorded with a high speed video camera. In the isolated bubble region, surface temperature was uniform during waiting time. When boiling bubble generation started, a large dip in the surface temperature distribution was formed under the bubble. After the bubble left from the heat transfer surface, the surface temperature distribution returned to former uniform distribution. Surface temperature was not affected by the bubble generation beyond 1.8 mm from the center of the bubble. In the intermediate and high heat flux region, the variation of surface temperature and heat flux did not become large even though the heat flux increased. The heat flux variation was close to that at the isolated boiling region.

Journal Articles

The Present situation and future prospects of groundwater colloids studies on the performance assessment of geological disposal of radioactive wastes in Japan

Nagao, Seiya*; Niibori, Yuichi*; Tanaka, Tadao; Sasaki, Takayuki*; Saito, Takumi*; Kirishima, Akira*; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Iijima, Kazuki; Hama, Katsuhiro; Iwatsuki, Teruki; et al.

Genshiryoku Bakkuendo Kenkyu (CD-ROM), 20(1), p.3 - 14, 2013/06

This paper shows a current status of groundwater colloids studies on the performance assessment of geological disposal of radioactive wastes in Japan, and summaries realistic approach of the colloids studies at a substantial research network for Japanese universities and institutes.

Journal Articles

Alternative splicing in human transcriptome; Functional and structural influence on proteins

Yura, Kei; Shionyu, Masafumi*; Hagino, Kei*; Hijikata, Atsushi*; Hirashima, Yoshinori*; Nakahara, Taku*; Eguchi, Tatsuya*; Shinoda, Kazuki*; Yamaguchi, Akihiro*; Takahashi, Kenichi*; et al.

Gene, 380(2), p.63 - 71, 2006/10

 Times Cited Count:52 Percentile:73.2(Genetics & Heredity)

Alternative splicing is a molecular mechanism that produces multiple proteins from a single gene, and is thought to produce variety in proteins translated from a limited number of genes. Here we analyzed how alternative splicing produced variety in protein structure and function, by using human full-length cDNAs, on the assumption that all of the alternatively spliced mRNAs were translated to proteins. We found that the length of alternatively spliced amino acid sequences, in most cases, fell into a size shorter than that of average protein domain. We evaluated comprehensively the presumptive three-dimensional structures of the alternatively spliced products to assess the impact of alternative splicing on gene function. We found that more than half of the products encoded proteins which were involved in signal transduction, transcription and translation, and more than half of alternatively spliced regions comprised interaction sites between proteins and their binding partners, including substrates, DNA/RNA, and other proteins. Intriguingly, 67% of the alternatively spliced isoforms showed significant alterations to regions of the protein structural core, which likely resulted in large conformational change. Based on those findings, we speculate that there are a large number of cases that alternative splicing modulates protein networks through significant alteration in protein conformation.

JAEA Reports

Investigation of the Hydraulic Properties around the Active Fault in the Crustal Deformation Zone

Takemura, Tomoyuki*; Shingu, Kazuki*; Takahashi, Eiichiro*; Okada, Yoichi*; Takebe, Akimitsu*; Nakajima, Toshihide*; Inoue, Toshio*

JNC TJ7420 2005-033, 128 Pages, 1998/03

JNC-TJ7420-2005-033.pdf:51.98MB

The active fault survey tunnel that crossed the Mozumi-Sukenobu fault (a member of the Atotsugawa fault system) is located at the Kamioka mine, northern Gifu prefecture, Central Japan. The comprehensive study of the active fault is done by using this tunnel. The purpose of this investigation is to define the hydrological characteristics of the Mozumi-Sukenobu fault crush zones. The permeability of the crush zones is measured by the Lugeon test and the simple injection test.

JAEA Reports

None

*; Shingu, Kazuki*; Takahashi, Eiichiro*; Nakajima, Toshihide*; Yamashita, Mitsugu*; *; *

PNC TJ7187 97-002, 586 Pages, 1997/11

PNC-TJ7187-97-002.pdf:47.21MB

None

Oral presentation

Systematic detection of protein regions affected by alternative splicing

Shionyu, Masafumi*; Yura, Kei; Hijikata, Atsushi*; Nakahara, Taku*; Shinoda, Kazuki*; Yamaguchi, Akihiro*; Takahashi, Kenichi*; Go, Michiko*

no journal, , 

Alternative splicing (AS) is a cellular process where multiple mature mRNAs are produced from a single gene by different usage of exons. From computational and experimental approaches, it is estimated that 30-70% of human genes undergo alternative splicing. There are a number of reports on spliced mRNAs involved in biological processes, yet functional analyses of a large number of proteins produced by AS remain to be performed. Functional analyses of these proteins by experiments are time-consuming, and therefore, a computational approach that can estimate effect of AS on proteins is required. We have developed a pipeline that can systematically detect AS regions, which are defined as protein regions modified by alternatively spliced exon, using genomic sequences and full-length transcripts data. The pipeline further assigned AS regions to protein three-dimensional structures and can estimate effects of AS on protein conformation stability and functional sites. We analyzed human AS regions using our pipeline and found that about half of AS regions fell into a size shorter than 100 amino acid residues. We, then, assessed the relationship between AS regions and protein structural domains and found that about 40% of AS regions were placed within a domain and the ratio of AS regions corresponding to domains was only about 10%. This result suggests that AS regulates protein function through alteration of segments within a domain rather than through switching protein domains. We will discuss how AS regulates protein function through alteration of segments within a domain.

Oral presentation

The Effect of Ti compound on dehydrogenation of Mg(BH$$_{4}$$)$$_{2}$$ observed by dispersive XAFS

Oyama, Takahiro; Matsumura, Daiju; Okajima, Yuka; Nishihata, Yasuo; Li, H.-W.*; Ikeda, Kazuki*; Orimo, Shinichi*; Takahashi, Isao*

no journal, , 

Complex bronhydride Mg(B$$_{4}$$)$$_{2}$$ is known to have lower dehydrogenation temperature by doping Ti chloride or Ti oxide. In this study, we observed real-time local structural transformation around Ti atoms during temperature induced dehydrogenation by dispersive XAFS method. For the case of Ti chloride doping, it is revealed that Ti atoms form bronhydride complex before temperature heating. Adrupt hydrogen desorption from Ti bronhydride makes the dehydrogenation temperature small. On the other hand, in the case of Ti oxide doping, Ti keeps its structure before heating. As temperature is raised, Ti slowly changes to TiB$$_{2}$$ with catalytic behavior for dehydrogenation of Mg(BH$$_{4}$$)$$_{2}$$.

Oral presentation

Development of the novel fluorescent probe for analysis of actinide by capillary electrophoresis-laser-induced fluorescence detection

Sato, Yoshiyuki; Haraga, Tomoko; Nakano, Yuta*; Ouchi, Kazuki; Ito, Yuki*; Ishimori, Kenichiro; Takahashi, Kuniaki; Saito, Shingo*

no journal, , 

For the development of a simple and rapid analytical method for actinides (Thorium, Uranium, Neptunium, Plutonium, Americium and Curium) in radioactive wastes, capillary electrophoresis-laser -induced fluorescence detecting method (CE-LIF) was studied. In this research, newly synthesized eight probes whose chelating group were acyclic or macrocyclic were applied to the detection of actinides using CE-LIF. As a result, Thorium and Uranium were successfully detected and separated from other actinide ions applied to octadenate acyclic probe and tetradenate planer probe, respectively. Neptunium was detected using hexadenate or heptadenate probes whose chelating groups were acyclic or macrocyclic. Plutonium was detected applied to hexadenate or octadenate acyclic probes. Americium and Curium were detected applied to seven probes except for tetradenate planer probe.

28 (Records 1-20 displayed on this page)