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Journal Articles

Improving the safety of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor "HTTR" based on Japan's new regulatory requirements

Hamamoto, Shimpei; Shimizu, Atsushi; Inoi, Hiroyuki; Tochio, Daisuke; Homma, Fumitaka; Sawahata, Hiroaki; Sekita, Kenji; Watanabe, Shuji; Furusawa, Takayuki; Iigaki, Kazuhiko; et al.

Nuclear Engineering and Design, 388, p.111642_1 - 111642_11, 2022/03

Following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in 2011, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency adapted High-Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) to meet the new regulatory requirements that began in December 2013. The safety and seismic classifications of the existing structures, systems, and components were discussed to reflect insights regarding High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) that were acquired through various HTTR safety tests. Structures, systems, and components that are subject to protection have been defined, and countermeasures to manage internal and external hazards that affect safety functions have been strengthened. Additionally, measures are in place to control accidents that may cause large amounts of radioactive material to be released, as a beyond design based accident. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission rigorously and appropriately reviewed this approach for compliance with the new regulatory requirements. After nine amendments, the application to modify the HTTR's installation license that was submitted in November 2014 was approved in June 2020. This response shows that facilities can reasonably be designed to meet the enhanced regulatory requirements, if they reflect the characteristics of HTGRs. We believe that we have established a reference for future development of HTGR.

JAEA Reports

Impact assessment for internal flooding in HTTR (High temperature engineering test reactor)

Tochio, Daisuke; Nagasumi, Satoru; Inoi, Hiroyuki; Hamamoto, Shimpei; Ono, Masato; Kobayashi, Shoichi; Uesaka, Takahiro; Watanabe, Shuji; Saito, Kenji

JAEA-Technology 2021-014, 80 Pages, 2021/09

JAEA-Technology-2021-014.pdf:5.87MB

In response to the new regulatory standards established in response to the accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station in March 2011, measures and impact assessments related to internal flooding at HTTR were carried out. In assessing the impact, considering the characteristics of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor, flooding due to assumed damage to piping and equipment, flooding due to water discharge from the system installed to prevent the spread of fire, and flooding due to damage to piping and equipment due to an earthquake. The effects of submersion, flooding, and flooding due to steam were evaluated for each of them. The impact of the overflow of liquids containing radioactive materials outside the radiation-controlled area was also evaluated. As a result, it was confirmed that flooding generated at HTTR does not affect the safety function of the reactor facility by taking measures.

Journal Articles

The Surface composition of asteroid 162173 Ryugu from Hayabusa2 near-infrared spectroscopy

Kitazato, Kohei*; Milliken, R. E.*; Iwata, Takahiro*; Abe, Masanao*; Otake, Makiko*; Matsuura, Shuji*; Arai, Takehiko*; Nakauchi, Yusuke*; Nakamura, Tomoki*; Matsuoka, Moe*; et al.

Science, 364(6437), p.272 - 275, 2019/04

 Times Cited Count:140 Percentile:99.81(Multidisciplinary Sciences)

The near-Earth asteroid 162173 Ryugu, the target of Hayabusa2 sample return mission, is believed to be a primitive carbonaceous object. The Near Infrared Spectrometer (NIRS3) on Hayabusa2 acquired reflectance spectra of Ryugu's surface to provide direct measurements of the surface composition and geological context for the returned samples. A weak, narrow absorption feature centered at 2.72 micron was detected across the entire observed surface, indicating that hydroxyl (OH)-bearing minerals are ubiquitous there. The intensity of the OH feature and low albedo are similar to thermally- and/or shock-metamorphosed carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. There are few variations in the OH-band position, consistent with Ryugu being a compositionally homogeneous rubble-pile object generated from impact fragments of an undifferentiated aqueously altered parent body.

Journal Articles

NIRS3; The Near Infrared Spectrometer on Hayabusa2

Iwata, Takahiro*; Kitazato, Kohei*; Abe, Masanao*; Otake, Makiko*; Arai, Takehiko*; Arai, Tomoko*; Hirata, Naru*; Hiroi, Takahiro*; Honda, Chikatoshi*; Imae, Naoya*; et al.

Space Science Reviews, 208(1-4), p.317 - 337, 2017/07

 Times Cited Count:33 Percentile:72.27(Astronomy & Astrophysics)

NIRS3: The Near Infrared Spectrometer is installed on the Hayabusa2 spacecraft to observe the target C-type asteroid 162173 Ryugu at near infrared wavelengths of 1.8 to 3.2 micrometer. It aims to obtain reflectance spectra in order to detect absorption bands of hydrated and hydroxide minerals in the 3 micrometer-band. We adopted a linear-image sensor with indium arsenide (InAs) photo diodes and a cooling system with a passive radiator to achieve an optics temperature of 188 K, which enables to retaining sufficient sensitivity and noise level in the 3 micrometer wavelength region. We conducted ground performance tests for the NIRS3 flight model (FM) to confirm its baseline specifications. The results imply that the properties such as the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) conform to scientific requirements to determine the degree of aqueous alteration, such as CM or CI chondrite, and the stage of thermal metamorphism on the asteroid surface.

Journal Articles

Development of unstructured mesh-based numerical method for sodium-water reaction phenomenon in steam generators of sodium-cooled fast reactors

Uchibori, Akihiro; Watanabe, Akira*; Takata, Takashi; Ohno, Shuji; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

Proceedings of OECD/NEA & IAEA Workshop on Application of CFD/CMFD Codes to Nuclear Reactor Safety and Design and their Experimental Validation (CFD4NRS-6) (Internet), 11 Pages, 2016/09

For assessment of the wastage environment under tube failure accident in a steam generator of sodium-cooled fast reactors, a mechanistic computer code called SERAPHIM calculating compressible multicomponent multiphase flow with sodium-water chemical reaction has been developed. The original SERAPHIM code is based on the finite difference method. In this study, unstructured mesh-based numerical method was developed and introduced into the SERAPHIM code to advance a numerical accuracy for the complex-shaped domain including multiple heat transfer tubes. Validity of the unstructured mesh-based SERAPHIM code was investigated through the analysis of an under expanded jet experiment. The calculated pressure profile showed good agreement with the experimental data. Numerical analysis of water vapor discharging into liquid sodium was also performed. It was demonstrated that the proposed numerical method could be applicable to evaluation of the sodium-water reaction phenomenon.

Journal Articles

Progress in long-pulse production of powerful negative ion beams for JT-60SA and ITER

Kojima, Atsushi; Umeda, Naotaka; Hanada, Masaya; Yoshida, Masafumi; Kashiwagi, Mieko; Tobari, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Akino, Noboru; Komata, Masao; Mogaki, Kazuhiko; et al.

Nuclear Fusion, 55(6), p.063006_1 - 063006_9, 2015/06

 Times Cited Count:29 Percentile:89.03(Physics, Fluids & Plasmas)

Significant progresses in the extension of pulse durations of powerful negative ion beams have been made to realize the neutral beam injectors for JT-60SA and ITER. In order to overcome common issues of the long pulse production/acceleration of negative ion beams in JT-60SA and ITER, the new technologies have been developed in the JT-60SA ion source and the MeV accelerator in Japan Atomic Energy Agency. As for the long pulse production of high-current negative ions for JT-60SA ion source, the pulse durations have been successfully increased from 30 s at 13 A on JT-60U to 100 s at 15 A by modifying the JT-60SA ion source, which satisfies the required pulse duration of 100 s and 70% of the rated beam current for JT-60SA. This progress was based on the R&D efforts for the temperature control of the plasma grid and uniform negative ion productions with the modified tent-shaped filter field configuration. Moreover, the each parameter of the required beam energy, current and pulse has been achieved individually by these R&D efforts. The developed techniques are useful to design the ITER ion source because the sustainment of the cesium coverage in large extraction area is one of the common issues between JT-60SA and ITER. As for the long pulse acceleration of high power density beams in the MeV accelerator for ITER, the pulse duration of MeV-class negative ion beams has been extended by more than 2 orders of magnitude by modifying the extraction grid with a high cooling capability and a high-transmission of negative ions. A long pulse acceleration of 60 s has been achieved at 70 MW/m$$^{2}$$ (683 keV, 100 A/m$$^{2}$$) which has reached to the power density of JT-60SA level of 65 MW/m$$^{2}$$.

JAEA Reports

Integrity check of emergency generator for the HTTR after the Tohoku-Pacific Ocean Earthquake

Homma, Fumitaka; Inoi, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Shuji; Fukutani, Koji*

JAEA-Technology 2013-034, 57 Pages, 2013/12

JAEA-Technology-2013-034.pdf:11.01MB

Emergency generator of HTTR started in the blackout occurred just after an Tohoku Pacific Ocean Earthquake on March 11, 2011 with an intensity of 5 upper on the Japanese seven stage seismic scale and its duration time was long. In addition, we suffer from multiple severe aftershocks just after the start of emergency generators. Emergency generator of HTTR was able to supply output electric power sufficiently and stably to required loads. We carried on integrity check of the emergency generator for the HTTR after the earthquake. In particular, we put emphasis on finding faults caused by thee earthquake shaking. As a result, we found that the erosion in a combustion liner, and the condition of erosion was very strange and rare. Therefore, we carried out investigations of causes of erosion, and change of specifications for combustion liner to prevent erosion. This measure improve the reliability for the further Large-Scale earthquake.

Journal Articles

Progress in development and design of the neutral beam injector for JT-60SA

Hanada, Masaya; Kojima, Atsushi; Tanaka, Yutaka; Inoue, Takashi; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Taniguchi, Masaki; Kashiwagi, Mieko; Tobari, Hiroyuki; Umeda, Naotaka; Akino, Noboru; et al.

Fusion Engineering and Design, 86(6-8), p.835 - 838, 2011/10

 Times Cited Count:8 Percentile:58.2(Nuclear Science & Technology)

Neutral beam (NB) injectors for JT-60 Super Advanced (JT-60SA) have been designed and developed. Twelve positive-ion-based and one negative-ion-based NB injectors are allocated to inject 30 MW D$$^{0}$$ beams in total for 100 s. Each of the positive-ion-based NB injector is designed to inject 1.7 MW for 100s at 85 keV. A part of the power supplies and magnetic shield utilized on JT-60U are upgraded and reused on JT-60SA. To realize the negative-ion-based NB injector for JT-60SA where the injection of 500 keV, 10 MW D$$^{0}$$ beams for 100s is required, R&Ds of the negative ion source have been carried out. High-energy negative ion beams of 490-500 keV have been successfully produced at a beam current of 1-2.8 A through 20% of the total ion extraction area, by improving voltage holding capability of the ion source. This is the first demonstration of a high-current negative ion acceleration of $$>$$1 A to 500 keV. The design of the power supplies and the beamline is also in progress. The procurement of the acceleration power supply starts in 2010.

Journal Articles

Development of the JT-60SA Neutral Beam Injectors

Hanada, Masaya; Kojima, Atsushi; Inoue, Takashi; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Taniguchi, Masaki; Kashiwagi, Mieko; Tobari, Hiroyuki; Umeda, Naotaka; Akino, Noboru; Kazawa, Minoru; et al.

AIP Conference Proceedings 1390, p.536 - 544, 2011/09

 Times Cited Count:5 Percentile:77.65

no abstracts in English

Journal Articles

Achievement of 500 keV negative ion beam acceleration on JT-60U negative-ion-based neutral beam injector

Kojima, Atsushi; Hanada, Masaya; Tanaka, Yutaka*; Kawai, Mikito*; Akino, Noboru; Kazawa, Minoru; Komata, Masao; Mogaki, Kazuhiko; Usui, Katsutomi; Sasaki, Shunichi; et al.

Nuclear Fusion, 51(8), p.083049_1 - 083049_8, 2011/08

 Times Cited Count:42 Percentile:88.1(Physics, Fluids & Plasmas)

Hydrogen negative ion beams of 490 keV, 3 A and 510 keV, 1 A have been successfully produced in the JT-60 negative ion source with three acceleration stages. These successful productions of the high-energy beams at high current have been achieved by overcoming the most critical issue, i.e., a poor voltage holding of the large negative ion sources with the grids of 2 m$$^{2}$$ for JT-60SA and ITER. To improve voltage holding capability, the breakdown voltages for the large grids was examined for the first time. It was found that a vacuum insulation distance for the large grids was 6-7 times longer than that for the small-area grid (0.02 m$$^{2}$$). From this result, the gap lengths between the grids were tuned in the JT-60 negative ion source. The modification of the ion source also realized a significant stabilization of voltage holding and a short conditioning time. These results suggest a practical use of the large negative ion sources in JT-60SA and ITER.

Journal Articles

Demonstration of 500 keV beam acceleration on JT-60 negative-ion-based neutral beam injector

Kojima, Atsushi; Hanada, Masaya; Tanaka, Yutaka*; Kawai, Mikito*; Akino, Noboru; Kazawa, Minoru; Komata, Masao; Mogaki, Kazuhiko; Usui, Katsutomi; Sasaki, Shunichi; et al.

Proceedings of 23rd IAEA Fusion Energy Conference (FEC 2010) (CD-ROM), 8 Pages, 2011/03

Hydrogen negative ion beams of 490keV, 3A and 510 keV, 1A have been successfully produced in the JT-60 negative ion source with three acceleration stages. These successful productions of the high-energy beams at high current have been achieved by overcoming the most critical issue, i.e., a poor voltage holding of the large negative ion sources with the grids of $$sim$$ 2 m$$^{2}$$ for JT-60SA and ITER. To improve voltage holding capability, the breakdown voltages for the large grids was examined for the first time. It was found that a vacuum insulation distance for the large grids was 6-7 times longer than that for the small-area grid (0.02 m$$^{2}$$). From this result, the gap lengths between the grids were tuned in the JT-60 negative ion source. The modification of the ion source also realized a significant stabilization of voltage holding and a short conditioning time. These results suggest a practical use of the large negative ion sources in JT-60 SA and ITER.

Journal Articles

Development and design of the negative-ion-based NBI for JT-60 Super Advanced

Hanada, Masaya; Akino, Noboru; Endo, Yasuei; Inoue, Takashi; Kawai, Mikito; Kazawa, Minoru; Kikuchi, Katsumi; Komata, Masao; Kojima, Atsushi; Mogaki, Kazuhiko; et al.

Journal of Plasma and Fusion Research SERIES, Vol.9, p.208 - 213, 2010/08

A large negative ion source with an ion extraction area of 110 cm $$times$$ 45 cm has been developed to produce 500 keV, 22 A D$$^{-}$$ ion beams required for JT-60 Super Advanced. To realize the JT-60SA negative ion source, the JT-60 negative ion source has been modified and tested on the negative-ion-based neutral beam injector on JT-60U. A 500 keV H$$^{-}$$ ion beam has been produced at 3 A without a significant degradation of beam optics. This is the first demonstration of a high energy negative ion acceleration of more than one-ampere to 500 keV in the world. The beam current density of 90 A/m$$^{2}$$ is being increased to meet 130 A/m$$^{2}$$ of the design value for JT-60SA by tuning the operation parameters. A long pulse injection of 30 s has been achieved at a injection D$$^{0}$$ power of 3 MW. The injection energy, defined as the product of the injection time and power, reaches 80 MJ by neutralizing a 340 keV, 27 A D$$^{-}$$ ion beam produced with two negative ion sources.

Journal Articles

Mutation breeding of a new chrysanthemum variety by irradiation of ion beams to "Jinba"

Watanabe, Hideki*; Toyoda, Tomomi*; Emoto, Keishi*; Yoshimatsu, Shuji*; Hase, Yoshihiro; Kamisoyama, Shigeru*

JAEA-Review 2008-055, JAEA Takasaki Annual Report 2007, P. 81, 2008/11

no abstracts in English

JAEA Reports

Maintenance of the auxiliary component cooling water system and the general cooling water system in HTTR

Kameyama, Yasuhiko; Watanabe, Shuji; Inoi, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Yasunori; Aragaki, Etsushi; Shinozaki, Masayuki; Ota, Yukimaru

JAEA-Testing 2008-001, 63 Pages, 2008/03

JAEA-Testing-2008-001.pdf:20.97MB

The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) has the Auxiliary Component Cooling Water System (ACCWS) and the General Cooling Water System (GCWS). ACCWS supplies the cooling water to the many facilities those are necessary to operate and cool the reactor. GCWS supplies the cooling water to the many facilities those are necessary to operate and cool the reactor in normal circumstances. Two kinds of the cooling water are cooled with the Cooling Tower. Each facility has the circulation pump, the cooling tower, the piping, the valve, the strainer and the injection system of the chemical solution. And these two facilities are operating all the year. This report describes maintenance items, improvements and management of the ACCWS and the GCWS.

Journal Articles

Induction of new color variation by irradiation of ion beams to light yellow "Jinba"

Toyoda, Tomomi*; Watanabe, Hideki*; Emoto, Keishi*; Yoshimatsu, Shuji*; Hase, Yoshihiro; Kamisoyama, Shigeru*

JAEA-Review 2007-060, JAEA Takasaki Annual Report 2006, P. 81, 2008/03

no abstracts in English

Journal Articles

Northern Hemisphere forcing of climatic cycles in Antarctica over the past 360,000 years

Kawamura, Kenji*; Parrenin, F.*; Lisiecki, L.*; Uemura, Ryu*; Vimeux, F.*; Severinghaus, J. P.*; Hutterli, M. A.*; Nakazawa, Takakiyo*; Aoki, Shuji*; Jouzel, J.*; et al.

Nature, 448(7156), p.912 - 916, 2007/08

 Times Cited Count:289 Percentile:96.48(Multidisciplinary Sciences)

We present a new chronology of Antarctic climate change over the past 360,000 years that is based on the ratio of oxygen to nitrogen molecules in air trapped in the Dome Fuji and Vostok ice cores. This ratio is a proxy for local summer insolation, and thus allows the chronology to be constructed by orbital tuning without the need to assume a lag between a climate record and an orbital parameter. The accuracy of the chronology allows us to examine the phase relationships between climate records from the ice cores and changes in insolation. Our results indicate that orbital-scale Antarctic climate change lags Northern Hemisphere insolation by a few millennia, and that the increases in Antarctic temperature and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration during the last four terminations occurred within the rising phase of Northern Hemisphere summer insolation. These results support the Milankovitch theory that Northern Hemisphere summer insolation triggered the last four deglaciations.

JAEA Reports

Operating experiences since rise-to-power test in High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

Tochio, Daisuke; Watanabe, Shuji; Motegi, Toshihiro; Kawano, Shuichi; Kameyama, Yasuhiko; Sekita, Kenji; Kawasaki, Kozo

JAEA-Technology 2007-014, 62 Pages, 2007/03

JAEA-Technology-2007-014.pdf:9.74MB

The rise-to-power test of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) was begun in April 2000. The reactor thermal power of 30 MW, which is the maximum thermal power of the HTTR, and the reactor outlet coolant temperature of 850$$^{circ}$$C in normal operation was achieved in middle of December 2001. After that reactor thermal power of 30 MW a reactor outlet coolant temperature of 950$$^{circ}$$C was achieved in the final rise-to-power test at April 2004. After receiving the operation permit, the safety demonstration tests were conducted to demonstrate inherent safety features of the HTGRs. This paper summarizes the HTTR operating experiences for five years since rise-to-power test that were catalogued into three categories, (1) Operating experience pertaining to new gas cooled reactor design, (2) Operating experience for improvement of the performance, (3) Operating experience due to fail of system and components.

JAEA Reports

Evaluation of heat exchange performance for secondary pressurized water cooler in HTTR

Tochio, Daisuke; Watanabe, Shuji; Saikusa, Akio; Oyama, Sunao; Nemoto, Takahiro; Hamamoto, Shimpei; Shinohara, Masanori; Isozaki, Minoru; Nakagawa, Shigeaki

JAEA-Technology 2006-005, 83 Pages, 2006/02

JAEA-Technology-2006-005.pdf:6.09MB

In High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), the rated thermal power of 30MW, the generated heat at reactor core is finally dissipated at the air-cooler by way of the heat exchangers of the primary cooling system, such as the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and the secondary pressurized water cooler (SPWC). The heat exchangers in the main cooling system are required the heat exchange performance to remove the reactor-generated-heat of 30MW under the condition of reactor coolant outlet temperature of 850 $$^{circ}$$C/ 950 $$^{circ}$$C. Therefore, the heat exchanges are required to satisfy the design criteria of heat exchange performance. In this report, heat exchange performance of the SPWC in the main cooling system was evaluated with the rise-to-power-up test and the in-service operation data. Moreover, evaluated value is compared with designed one, it is confirmed that the SPWC has required heat exchange performance.

JAEA Reports

Change in heat exchange performance of VCS cooler and its recovery works

Hamamoto, Shimpei; Watanabe, Shuji; Oyama, Sunao*; Ota, Yukimaru; Tochio, Daisuke; Fujimoto, Nozomu

JAERI-Tech 2005-035, 35 Pages, 2005/07

JAERI-Tech-2005-035.pdf:2.54MB

The Vessel Cooling System (VCS) is one of the safety engineered features of the HTTR. The VCS removes the decay heat of the reactor core when the forced circulation can not be maintained due to pipe rupture accidents, etc. VCS cools the core by water cooling panels surrounding the reactor pressure vessel. The VCS also keeps the temperature of the concrete of the primary shielding under the design limit during the operation. The temperature of cooling water of the VCS has recently tended to rise gradually, though the amount of heat removal of VCS has been constant. Accompanying with the increase of the cooling water temperature, the temperature of the shielding concrete is also possible to rise and exceed the limit. The heat exchange performance of the VCS cooler was evaluated and the deterioration of the cooler was verified. Therefore, the cleaning of heat transfer tubes was carried out to recover the heat exchange performance. The cleaning recovered the performance of the VCS cooler drastically and the cooling water temperature of the VCS could be reduced sufficiently.

Journal Articles

Target station design of 1 MW spallation neutron source at the high intensity proton accelerator facilities J-PARC

Takada, Hiroshi; Maekawa, Fujio; Honmura, Shiro*; Yoshida, Katsuhiko*; Teraoku, Takuji*; Meigo, Shinichiro; Sakai, Akio*; Kasugai, Yoshimi; Kanechika, Shuji*; Otake, Hidenori*; et al.

Proceedings of ICANS-XVI, Volume 3, p.1115 - 1125, 2003/07

no abstracts in English

48 (Records 1-20 displayed on this page)