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Journal Articles

R&D of invar duct for fabrication of 2nd JSNS moderators

Harada, Masahide; Teshigawara, Makoto; Maekawa, Fujio; Oi, Motoki; Kasugai, Yoshimi; Takada, Hiroshi

Journal of Nuclear Materials, 450(1-3), p.104 - 109, 2014/07

 Times Cited Count:1 Percentile:10.7(Materials Science, Multidisciplinary)

Japan Spallation Neutron Source (JSNS) in Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) has three super-critical hydrogen moderators. The moderator piping has a multilayer structure; a cryogenic layer, a vacuum layer, a helium layer and a cooling water layer. Through the fabrication of the current (1st) moderators, we learned that thermal shrinkage between room temperature (R.T.) and cryogenic temperature at the cryogenic layer made the fabrication process very difficult. Therefore, for the spare (2nd) moderators, we proposed to use a low thermal shrinkage material, Invar, as a piping material. However, there were items to be solved for realizing the Invar duct inview of the fabrication. In this presentation, we report results of (1) Bending test, (2) Welding test and (3) Dissimilar joint test on the Invar duct. (1) In the bending test, the Invar ducts of 22 mm in diameter and 1.5 mm in thickness were tried to be bent into an elbow with 40 mm in radius. By pre-cooling the duct in the liquid nitrogen followed by the bending with slow speed (1 minute), the duct could be bent without any cracks. (2) Through some welding testes by TIG-welding, the proper groove geometry was determined. (3) For the dissimilar joint test, tensile specimens including a bonding region having size of 4 or 6 mm in diameter at the smallest part and 60 mm in length were cut from three rods made by Invar-A6061 and Invar-SS316L, respectively. Those rods were bonded by the friction welding. All specimens were examined at two temperatures, R.T. and 77 K (liquid nitrogen temperature), resulting that 0.2% proof stresses corresponding to the bonding strengths were larger than those of base materials for both the Invar-A6061 and the Invar-SS316L cases. The present result indicates that the Invar duct is available for the 2nd moderators.

Journal Articles

Bend-fatigue properties of JPCA and Alloy800H specimens irradiated in a spallation environment

Saito, Shigeru; Kikuchi, Kenji*; Hamaguchi, Dai; Endo, Shinya; Sakuraba, Naotoshi; Miyai, Hiromitsu; Kawai, Masayoshi*; Dai, Y.*

Journal of Nuclear Materials, 450(1-3), p.27 - 31, 2014/07

 Times Cited Count:0 Percentile:0.01(Materials Science, Multidisciplinary)

no abstracts in English

Journal Articles

Development of Au-In-Cd decoupler by a Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) technique for short pulsed spallation neutron source

Oi, Motoki; Teshigawara, Makoto; Harada, Masahide; Naoe, Takashi; Maekawa, Fujio; Kasugai, Yoshimi

Journal of Nuclear Materials, 450(1-3), p.117 - 122, 2014/07

 Times Cited Count:3 Percentile:28.59(Materials Science, Multidisciplinary)

In order to utilize Au-In-Cd alloy as a decoupler, it is required to bond between the Au-In-Cd alloy and aluminum alloy with enough bonding strength (more than 30 MPa). We adopted a Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) technique to realize bonding between Au-In-Cd and aluminum alloy, because it is available for curved shape of moderator vessel. As a HIP conditions of the temperature of 535 $$^{circ}$$C, pressure of 100 MPa and holding time of 1 hour, we got enough tensile strength of the bonding surface (86.6 MPa). It is larger than the required strength of 30 MPa.

Journal Articles

Damage inspection of the first mercury target vessel of JSNS

Naoe, Takashi; Teshigawara, Makoto; Wakui, Takashi; Kinoshita, Hidetaka; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Haga, Katsuhiro; Futakawa, Masatoshi

Journal of Nuclear Materials, 450(1-3), p.123 - 129, 2014/07

 Times Cited Count:8 Percentile:60.89(Materials Science, Multidisciplinary)

A JSNS mercury target vessel composed of type 316L stainless steel suffers radiation damage in the proton and neutron environment. In addition to this damage, the inner wall of the target vessel in contact with mercury is damaged as a result of the cavitation. The target vessel was replaced with a new target in November 2011, because the pneumatic bellows were damaged during the earthquake. Before replacing the target, disk specimens were cut from the beam window of the target vessel in order to investigate the cavitation damage inside the target vessel and to evaluate the change in the mechanical properties due to radiation damage. As a result, it was confirmed that flow-induced erosion damage was not observed on the flow guide. The cavitation damage was concentrated at the center and around both sides approximately 15 mm from the center of the beam window. Based on the detailed measurements, it was concluded that the eroded damage depth of the beam window was 250 $$mu$$m.

Journal Articles

Small gas bubble experiment for mitigation of cavitation damage and pressure waves in short-pulse mercury spallation targets

Riemer, B. W.*; Wendel, M. W.*; Felde, D. K.*; Sangrey, R. L.*; Abdou, A.*; West, D. L.*; Shea, T. J.*; Hasegawa, Shoichi; Kogawa, Hiroyuki; Naoe, Takashi; et al.

Journal of Nuclear Materials, 450(1-3), p.192 - 203, 2014/07

 Times Cited Count:10 Percentile:65.28(Materials Science, Multidisciplinary)

Populations of small helium gas bubbles were introduced into a flowing mercury experiment test loop to evaluate mitigation of beam-pulse induced cavitation damage and pressure waves. The test loop was developed and thoroughly tested at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) prior to irradiations at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research Center (LANSCE-WNR) facility. Twelve candidate bubblers were evaluated over a range of mercury flow and gas injection rates by use of a novel optical measurement technique that accurately assessed the generated bubble size distributions. Final selection for irradiation testing included two variations of a swirl bubbler provided by Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) collaborators and one orifice bubbler developed at SNS. Bubble populations of interest consisted of sizes up to 150 $$mu$$m in radius with achieved gas void fractions in the 10$$^{-5}$$ to 10$$^{-4}$$ range. The nominal WNR beam pulse used for the experiment created energy deposition in the mercury comparable to SNS pulses operating at 2.5 MW. Nineteen test conditions were completed each with 100 pulses, including variations on mercury flow, gas injection and protons per pulse. The principal measure of cavitation damage mitigation was surface damage assessment on test specimens that were manually replaced for each test condition. Damage assessment was done after radiation decay and decontamination by optical and laser profiling microscopy with damaged area fraction and maximum pit depth being the more valued results. Damage was reduced by flow alone; the best mitigation from bubble injection was between half and a quarter that of flow alone. Other data collected included surface motion tracking by three laser Doppler vibrometers (LDV), loop wall dynamic strain, beam diagnostics for charge and beam profile assessment, embedded hydrophones and pressure sensors, and sound measurement by a suite of conventional and contact microphones.

Journal Articles

HCM12A Cr-rich oxide layer investigation using 3D atom probe

Kikuchi, Kenji*; Okada, Noriyuki*; Kato, Mikio*; Uchida, Hiroshi*; Saito, Shigeru

Journal of Nuclear Materials, 450(1-3), p.237 - 243, 2014/07

 Times Cited Count:3 Percentile:28.59(Materials Science, Multidisciplinary)

Three-dimensional atom probe techniques were applied to the investigation on the oxide scale in 12Cr ferritic-martensitic steel, HCM12A. A duplex oxide scale was formed in lead bismuth eutectic at 450-500$$^{circ}$$C, during 5500 h. Samples were located 500-700 nm away from the boundary between magnetite and Fe-Cr spinel layers, while the total oxide layer thickness is 18 $$mu$$m. It detected super enrichment of Cr with a size of ten nm roughly, as well as depletion of Fe and enrichment of O at the same site. Surrounding the Cr super enrichment area, enrichment of Si was newly noticed due to the scanned profile of detected atom counts. It is also confirmed that Pb and Bi concentration in the observed spinel region is almost null or less than 0.01 atomic percent, which is possible detecting lowest limit.

Oral presentation

Mechanical properties of W alloys and pure Ta irradiated at SINQ target 4

Saito, Shigeru; Kikuchi, Kenji*; Hamaguchi, Dai; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Endo, Shinya; Obata, Hiroki; Kurishita, Hiroaki*; Watanabe, Ryuzo*; Kawai, Masayoshi*; Yong, D.*

no journal, , 

no abstracts in English

Oral presentation

Cavitation damage in narrow channel

Naoe, Takashi; Futakawa, Masatoshi

no journal, , 

Cavitation damage is a crucial issue for realizing stable operation in the high-power spallation neutron source, because the damage reduces structural integrity of the target vessel. Double wall beam window is adopted for the next target vessel. The double wall structure is expected to prolong the lifetime of the target vessel by increasing the inner wall thickness. A damage reduction effect between the outer and the inner walls of the beam window is also expected. In order to demonstrate the effect of double wall, we conducted damage tests in the stagnant mercury with parametrically changing the gap width and the machine power. The experimental result showed that the cavitation damage formed between the two walls was reduced with decreasing the gap width. This may be caused by the suppression of cavitation bubble growth by the wall. The mechanisms of the damage reduction in the narrow channel were studied through the experiment and the numerical simulation.

Oral presentation

A Personal view on Japanese fuel cycle related to ADS in the post Fukushima era

Oigawa, Hiroyuki

no journal, , 

Accelerator-driven System (ADS) has been considered as a powerful tool to transmute minor actinides that dominate long-lived radiological toxicity in high-level waste. By the accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants, people reaffirmed the necessity to deal with the spent fuels safely. Although Japan selects the way to withdraw from the nuclear power, we should note that considerable amount of spent fuels, approximately 17,000 t, have been accumulated in Japan, The ultimate way to minimize environmental burden of spent fuels is the transmutation of all the transuranic (TRU) elements into to stable or short-lived fission products. ADS can be a candidate to transmute TRU elements, but the feasibility to burn large amount of plutonium should be verified.

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