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Journal Articles

Long-term simulations of radiocesium discharge in watershed with improved radiocesium wash-off model; Applying the model to Abukuma River basin of Fukushima

Liu, X.; Machida, Masahiko; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Kitamura, Akihiro

Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 203, p.135 - 146, 2019/07

In order to simulate the long-term migration and distribution of radiocesium after the Fukushima accident, a numerical model, Soil and Cesium Transport (SACT) based on universal soil loss equation (USLE), has been developed in previous studies. Although the SACT model's results on radiocesium discharge in 2011 are in reasonable agreement with field measurements, it fails to capture the sharp decrease of radiocesium flux in subsequent years, especially in the case of Abukuma River. We therefore have improved SACT by implementing the vertical migration and fixation of radiocesium in soil. For validation purpose, the annual average radiocesium concentration in sediments discharged from Abukuma River has been evaluated from measurement data. New model achieved much better agreement with the measurement results without parameter tuning.

Journal Articles

Importance of root uptake of $$^{14}$$CO$$_{2}$$ on $$^{14}$$C transfer to plants impacted by below-ground $$^{14}$$CH$$_{4}$$ release

Ota, Masakazu; Tanaka, Taku*

Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 201, p.5 - 18, 2019/05

 Percentile:100(Environmental Sciences)

$$^{14}$$CH$$_{4}$$ released from deep underground radioactive waste disposal facilities can be a belowground source of $$^{14}$$CO$$_{2}$$ owing to microbial oxidation of $$^{14}$$CH$$_{4}$$ to $$^{14}$$CO$$_{2}$$ in soils. Environmental $$^{14}$$C models assume that the transfer of $$^{14}$$CO$$_{2}$$ from soil to plant occurs via foliar uptake of $$^{14}$$CO$$_{2}$$. Nevertheless, the importance of $$^{14}$$CO$$_{2}$$ root uptake is not well understood. In the present study, belowground transport and oxidation of $$^{14}$$CH$$_{4}$$ were modeled and incorporated into an existing land surface $$^{14}$$CO$$_{2}$$ model (SOLVEG-II) to assess the importance of root uptake on $$^{14}$$CO$$_{2}$$ transfer to plants. Performance of the model in calculating the belowground dynamics of $$^{14}$$CH$$_{4}$$ was validated by simulating a field experiment of $$^{13}$$CH$$_{4}$$ injection into subsoil. The model was then applied to $$^{14}$$C transfer in a hypothetical ecosystem impacted by continuous $$^{14}$$CH$$_{4}$$ input from the water table (bottom of one-meter thick soil). In a shallowly rooted ecosystem with rooting depth of 11 cm, foliar uptake of $$^{14}$$CO$$_{2}$$ was significant, accounting for 80% of the $$^{14}$$C accumulation in the leaves. In a deeply rooted ecosystem (rooting depth of 97 cm), where the root penetrated to depths close to the water-table, more than half (63%) the $$^{14}$$C accumulated in the leaves was transferred by the root uptake. We found that $$^{14}$$CO$$_{2}$$ root uptake in this ecosystem depended on the distribution of methane oxidation in the soil; all $$^{14}$$C accumulated in the leaves was transferred by the root uptake when methane oxidation occurred at considerable depths (e-folding depths of 20 cm, or 80 cm). These results indicate that $$^{14}$$CO$$_{2}$$ root uptake contributes significantly to $$^{14}$$CO$$_{2}$$ transfer to plants if $$^{14}$$CH$$_{4}$$ oxidation occurs at great depths and roots penetrate deeply into the soil.

Journal Articles

Fukushima $$^{137}$$Cs releases dispersion modelling over the Pacific Ocean; Comparisons of models with water, sediment and biota data

Peri$'a$$~n$ez, R.*; Bezhenar, R.*; Brovchenko, I.*; Jung, K. T.*; Kamidaira, Yuki; Kim, K. O.*; Kobayashi, Takuya; Liptak, L.*; Maderich, V.*; Min, B. I.*; et al.

Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 198, p.50 - 63, 2019/03

 Percentile:100(Environmental Sciences)

A number of marine radionuclide dispersion models were applied to simulate $$^{137}$$Cs releases from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in 2011 over the northwest Pacific. Simulations extended over two years and both direct releases into the ocean and deposition of atmospheric releases on the ocean surface were considered. Dispersion models included an embedded biological uptake model (BUM). Three types of BUMs were used: equilibrium, dynamic and allometric. Model results were compared with $$^{137}$$Cs measurements in water, sediment and biota. A reasonable agreement in model/model and model/data comparisons was obtained.

Journal Articles

International challenge to model the long-range transport of radioxenon released from medical isotope production to six Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty monitoring stations

Maurer, C.*; Bar$'e$, J.*; Kusmierczyk-Michulec, J.*; Crawford, A.*; Eslinger, P. W.*; Seibert, P.*; Orr, B.*; Philipp, A.*; Ross, O.*; Generoso, S.*; et al.

Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 192, p.667 - 686, 2018/12

 Times Cited Count:1 Percentile:59.95(Environmental Sciences)

It is very important to understand the impact for CTBT stations caused by radioxenon emitted from medical isotope production facilities for detection of underground nuclear tests. Predictions of the impact on six CTBT radionuclide stations in the Southern Hemisphere of radioxenon emitted from the medical isotope production facility in Australia were carried out by participants from ten nations using ATM (Atmospheric Transport Modeling) based on the emission data of radioxenon from this facility, as part of study on impact of radioxenon emitted from medical isotope production facilities on CTBT radionuclide stations.

Journal Articles

Evaluation of ecological half-life of dose rate based on airborne radiation monitoring following the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

Sanada, Yukihisa; Urabe, Yoshimi*; Sasaki, Miyuki; Ochi, Kotaro; Torii, Tatsuo

Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 192, p.417 - 425, 2018/12

 Percentile:100(Environmental Sciences)

Journal Articles

Decreasing trend of ambient dose equivalent rates over a wide area in eastern Japan until 2016 evaluated by car-borne surveys using KURAMA systems

Ando, Masaki; Mikami, Satoshi; Tsuda, Shuichi; Yoshida, Tadayoshi; Matsuda, Norihiro; Saito, Kimiaki

Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 192, p.385 - 398, 2018/12

 Percentile:100(Environmental Sciences)

Car-borne surveys using KURAMA systems have been conducted over a wide area in eastern Japan since 2011. The measurement data collected until 2016 was analyzed, and decreasing trend of the dose rates in regions within 80 km of Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant were examined. The averaged dose rates tended to decrease considerably with respect to the physical decay of radiocaesium, and the ecological half-lives of the fast and slow decay components were estimated. The decrease of the dose rate in the forest was slower than its decrease in other regions, and the decrease of the dose rate in urban area was the fastest. The decrease in the dose rates obtained via the car-borne survey was larger than that obtained on flat ground with few disturbances using survey meters approximately 1.5 y after the accident; hereafter, the decrease in the dose rates obtained via the car-borne survey was same as the latter measurement.

Journal Articles

Distribution and fate of $$^{129}$$I in the seabed sediment off Fukushima

Otosaka, Shigeyoshi; Sato, Yuhi*; Suzuki, Takashi; Kuwabara, Jun; Nakanishi, Takahiro

Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 192, p.208 - 218, 2018/12

 Percentile:100(Environmental Sciences)

From August 2011 to October 2013, the concentration of iodine-129 ($$^{129}$$I) in the seabed sediment collected from 26 stations located within 160 km from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant was estimated. The concentrations of $$^{129}$$I in seabed sediment off Fukushima in 2011 ranged between 0.02 and 0.45 mBq/kg. Although iodine is a biophilic element, the accident-derived radioiodine negligibly affects the benthic ecosystem. Until October 2013, a slightly increased activity of $$^{129}$$I in the surface sediment in the shelf-edge region (bottom depth: 200-400 m) was observed. The increase of the $$^{129}$$I concentrations in the shelf-edge sediments was affected by the (1) transport of $$^{129}$$I-bound particles from the land through rivers and (2) re-deposition of $$^{129}$$I desorbed from the contaminated coastal sediment to the shelf-edge sediments, which were considered to be dominant processes.

Journal Articles

Measurement of ambient dose equivalent rates by walk survey around Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant using KURAMA-II until 2016

Ando, Masaki; Yamamoto, Hideaki*; Kanno, Takashi*; Saito, Kimiaki

Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 190-191, p.111 - 121, 2018/10

 Percentile:100(Environmental Sciences)

Ambient dose equivalent rates in various environments related to human lives were measured by walk surveys using the KURAMA-II systems from 2013 to 2016 around the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. The dose rate of the locations where the walk survey was performed decreased to about 38% of its initial value in the 42 months, which was beyond that attributable to the physical decay. The air dose rates decreased depending on the level of the evacuation areas, and the decrease was slightly larger in populated areas where humans are active. The comparison of walk survey data with car-borne survey data indicated that the air dose rate varies largely even within a 100 m square area. The dose rates measured by the walk surveys were estimated to be medial of those along roads and those of undisturbed flat ground. The air dose rates measured by the walk surveys decreased quickly compared with the air dose rate from the flat ground measurement.

Journal Articles

Evaluation of particulate $$^{137}$$Cs discharge from a mountainous forested catchment using reservoir sediments and sinking particles

Funaki, Hironori; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Sakuma, Kazuyuki; Iri, Shatei; Oda, Yoshihiro

Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 189, p.48 - 56, 2018/09

 Times Cited Count:1 Percentile:59.95(Environmental Sciences)

Journal Articles

Radiocesium interaction with clay minerals; Theory and simulation advances Post-Fukushima

Okumura, Masahiko; Kerisit, S.*; Bourg, I. C.*; Lammers, L. N.*; Ikeda, Takashi*; Sassi, M.*; Rosso, K. M.*; Machida, Masahiko

Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 189, p.135 - 145, 2018/09

 Times Cited Count:3 Percentile:25.55(Environmental Sciences)

no abstracts in English

Journal Articles

Characterizing regional-scale temporal evolution of air dose rates after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

Wainwright, H. M.*; Seki, Akiyuki; Mikami, Satoshi; Saito, Kimiaki

Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 189, p.213 - 220, 2018/09

 Percentile:100(Environmental Sciences)

In this study, we quantify the temporal changes of air dose rates in the regional scale around the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Japan, and predict the spatial distribution of air dose rates in the future. We first apply the Bayesian geostatistical method developed by Wainwright et al. (2017) to integrate multiscale datasets including ground-based walk and car surveys, and airborne surveys, all of which have different scales, resolutions, spatial coverage, and accuracy. We apply this method to the datasets from three years: 2014 to 2016. The temporal changes among the three integrated maps enables us to characterize the spatiotemporal dynamics of radiation air dose rates.

Journal Articles

Review of reduction factors by buildings for gamma radiation from radiocaesium deposited on the ground due to fallout

Yoshida-Ouchi, Hiroko*; Matsuda, Norihiro; Saito, Kimiaki

Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 187, p.32 - 39, 2018/07

 Percentile:100(Environmental Sciences)

Journal Articles

Applicability of $$K_{d}$$ for modelling dissolved $$^{137}$$Cs concentrations in Fukushima river water; Case study of the upstream Ota River

Sakuma, Kazuyuki; Tsuji, Hideki*; Hayashi, Seiji*; Funaki, Hironori; Malins, A.; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Kitamura, Akihiro; Iijima, Kazuki; Hosomi, Masaaki*

Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 184-185, p.53 - 62, 2018/04

 Times Cited Count:2 Percentile:59.95(Environmental Sciences)

A study is presented on the applicability of the distribution coefficient ($$K_{d}$$) absorption/desorption model to simulate dissolved $$^{137}$$Cs concentrations in Fukushima river water. The simulation results were in good agreement with the observations on water and suspended sediment fluxes, and on particulate bound $$^{137}$$Cs concentrations under both ambient and high flow conditions. By contrast the measured concentrations of dissolved $$^{137}$$Cs in the river water were much harder to reproduce with the simulations. By tuning the $$K_{d}$$ values for large particles, it was possible to reproduce the mean dissolved $$^{137}$$Cs concentrations during base flow periods (observation: 0.32 Bq/L, simulation: 0.36 Bq/L). However neither the seasonal variability in the base flow dissolved $$^{137}$$Cs concentrations (0.14-0.53 Bq/L), nor the peaks in concentration that occurred during storms (0.18-0.88 Bq/L, mean: 0.55 Bq/L), could be reproduced with realistic simulation parameters.

Journal Articles

Evaluation of sediment and $$^{137}$$Cs redistribution in the Oginosawa River catchment near the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant using integrated watershed modeling

Sakuma, Kazuyuki; Malins, A.; Funaki, Hironori; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Niizato, Tadafumi; Nakanishi, Takahiro; Mori, Koji*; Tada, Kazuhiro*; Kobayashi, Takamaru*; Kitamura, Akihiro; et al.

Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 182, p.44 - 51, 2018/02

 Times Cited Count:2 Percentile:38.23(Environmental Sciences)

The Oginosawa River catchment lies 15 km south-west of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant. The General-purpose Terrestrial Fluid-flow Simulator (GETFLOWS) code was used to study sediment and $$^{137}$$Cs redistribution within the catchment. Cesium-137 input to watercourses came predominantly from land adjacent to river channels and forest gullies. Forested areas far from the channels only made a minor contribution to $$^{137}$$Cs input to watercourses, total erosion of between 0.001-0.1 mm from May 2011 to December 2015. The 2.3-6.9% y$$^{-1}$$ decrease in the amount of $$^{137}$$Cs in forest topsoil over the study period can be explained by radioactive decay (approximately 2.3% y$$^{-1}$$), along with a migration downwards into subsoil and a small amount of export. The amount of $$^{137}$$Cs available for release from land adjacent to rivers is expected to be lower in future than compared to this study period, as the simulations indicate a high depletion of inventory from these areas.

Journal Articles

Application of topographical source model for air dose rates conversions in aerial radiation monitoring

Ishizaki, Azusa; Sanada, Yukihisa; Ishida, Mutsushi; Munakata, Masahiro

Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 180, p.82 - 89, 2017/12

 Times Cited Count:2 Percentile:69.03(Environmental Sciences)

After the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS) accident in 2011, aerial radiation monitoring (ARM) using a manned helicopter was conducted to rapidly measure air dose rates and the deposition of radioactive nuclides over a large area. Typically, the air dose rate is obtained by conversion from the count rate using the conventional flat source model (FSM). The converted dose rate via aerial monitoring poorly matches the results of ground measurement in the mountain and forest areas because the FSM does not consider topographical effects. To improve the conversion accuracy, we developed new methods to analyze aerial monitoring data using the topographical source model (TSM) based on the analytical calculation of the $$gamma$$-ray flux. The ARM results converted using both the FSM as well as TSM were compared with ground measurement data obtained after the FDNPS accident. By using TSM, the conversion accuracy was improved.

Journal Articles

Oceanic dispersion of Fukushima-derived Cs-137 simulated by multiple oceanic general circulation models

Kawamura, Hideyuki; Furuno, Akiko; Kobayashi, Takuya; In, Teiji*; Nakayama, Tomoharu*; Ishikawa, Yoichi*; Miyazawa, Yasumasa*; Usui, Norihisa*

Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 180, p.36 - 58, 2017/12

 Times Cited Count:2 Percentile:69.03(Environmental Sciences)

This study simulates the oceanic dispersion of Fukushima-derived Cs-137 by an oceanic dispersion model and multiple oceanic general circulation models. The models relatively well reproduced the observed Cs-137 concentrations in the coastal, offshore, and open oceans. Multiple simulations in the coastal, offshore, and open oceans consistently suggested that Cs-137 dispersed along the coast in the north-south direction during the first few months post-disaster, and were subsequently dispersed offshore by the Kuroshio Current and Kuroshio Extension. Quantification of the Cs-137 amounts suggested that Cs-137 actively dispersed from the coastal and offshore oceans to the open ocean, and from the surface layer to the deeper layers in the North Pacific.

Journal Articles

Distribution of $$^{137}$$Cs on components in urban area four years after the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

Yoshimura, Kazuya; Saito, Kimiaki; Fujiwara, Kenso

Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 178-179, p.48 - 54, 2017/11

 Times Cited Count:1 Percentile:83.76(Environmental Sciences)

Journal Articles

Role of soil-to-leaf tritium transfer in controlling leaf tritium dynamics; Comparison of experimental garden and tritium-transfer model results

Ota, Masakazu; Kwamena, N.-O. A.*; Mihok, S.*; Korolevych, V.*

Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 178-179, p.212 - 231, 2017/11

 Times Cited Count:2 Percentile:69.03(Environmental Sciences)

Environmental transfer models assume that organically-bound tritium (OBT) is formed directly from tissue-free water tritium (TFWT) in environmental compartments. Nevertheless, studies in the literature have shown that measured OBT/TFWT ratios are variable. The importance of soil-to-leaf HTO transfer pathway in controlling the leaf tritium dynamics is not well understood. A model inter-comparison of two tritium transfer models (CTEM-CLASS-TT and SOLVEG-II) was carried out with measured environmental samples from an experimental garden plot set up next to a tritium-processing facility. The garden plot received one of three different irrigation treatments - no external irrigation, irrigation with low tritium water and irrigation with high tritium water. The contrast between the results obtained with the different irrigation treatments provided insights into the impact of soil-to-leaf HTO transfer on the leaf tritium dynamics. Concentrations of TFWT and OBT in the garden plots that were not irrigated or irrigated with low tritium water were variable, responding to the arrival of the HTO-plume from the tritium-processing facility. In contrast, for the plants irrigated with high tritium water, the TFWT concentration remained elevated due to a continuous source of high HTO in the soil. Calculated concentrations of OBT in the leaves showed an initial increase followed by quasi-equilibration with the TFWT concentration. In this quasi-equilibrium state, concentrations of OBT remained elevated and unchanged despite the arrivals of the plume. These results from the model inter-comparison demonstrate that soil-to-leaf HTO transfer significantly affects OBT/TFWT ratio in the leaf regardless of the atmospheric HTO concentration, only if there is elevated HTO concentrations in the soil. The results of this work indicate that assessment models should be refined to consider the importance of soil-to-leaf HTO transfer to ensure that dose estimates are accurate and conservative.

Journal Articles

Using two detectors concurrently to monitor ambient dose equivalent rates in vehicle surveys of radiocesium contaminated land

Takeishi, Minoru; Shibamichi, Masaru; Malins, A.; Kurikami, Hiroshi; Murakami, Mitsuhiro*; Saegusa, Jun; Yoneya, Masayuki

Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 177, p.1 - 12, 2017/10

AA2016-0534.pdf:1.79MB

By convention radiation measurements from vehicle-borne surveys are converted to the dose rate at 1 m above the ground in the absence of the vehicle. To improve the accuracy of the converted results from vehicle-borne surveys, we investigated combining measurements from two detectors mounted on the vehicle at different heights above the ground. A dual-detector setup was added to a JAEA monitoring car and compared against hand-held survey meter measurements in Fukushima Prefecture. The dose rates obtained by combining measurements from two detectors were within $$pm$$20% of the hand-held reference measurements. The combined results from the two detectors were more accurate than those from either the roof-mounted detector, or the detector inside the vehicle, taken alone. When radiocesium is deficient on a road compared to the adjacent land, mounting detectors high on vehicles yields dose rates closer to the values adjacent to the road. We also investigated mounting heights for vehicle-borne detectors using Monte Carlo $$gamma$$-ray simulations.

Journal Articles

Coupling the advection-dispersion equation with fully kinetic reversible/irreversible sorption terms to model radiocesium soil profiles in Fukushima Prefecture

Kurikami, Hiroshi; Malins, A.; Takeishi, Minoru; Saito, Kimiaki; Iijima, Kazuki

Journal of Environmental Radioactivity, 171, p.99 - 109, 2017/05

 Times Cited Count:2 Percentile:69.03(Environmental Sciences)

A modified diffusion-sorption-fixation model (mDSF) is proposed to describe the vertical migration of radiocesium in soils following fallout. The model introduces kinetics for reversible sites, meaning that the exponential-shape radiocesium distribution can be reproduced immediately following fallout. The initial relaxation mass depth of the distribution is determined by the diffusion length, which depends on the distribution coefficient, sorption rate and dispersion coefficient. The model captures the long tails of the radiocesium distribution at large depths. These tails are caused by different rates for kinetic sorption and desorption.

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