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Journal Articles

Evaluation of uranium chemical state in borosilicate glasses by using XAFS measurement

Nagai, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Hidekazu; Okamoto, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Daisuke*; Sato, Nobuaki*

Photon Factory Activity Report 2017, 2 Pages, 2018/00

no abstracts in English

Journal Articles

Study on Mo structure in simulated dissolved solutions of activated metal waste

Shimada, Asako; Okamoto, Yoshihiro

Photon Factory Activity Report 2017, 2 Pages, 2018/00

no abstracts in English

Journal Articles

Microstructure analysis using X-ray absorption on heat-affected zone of reactor pressure vessel steel

Iwata, Keiko; Takamizawa, Hisashi; Ha, Yoosung; Okamoto, Yoshihiro; Shimoyama, Iwao; Honda, Mitsunori; Hanawa, Satoshi; Nishiyama, Yutaka

Photon Factory Activity Report 2017, 2 Pages, 2018/00

no abstracts in English

Journal Articles

Ion desorption from cesium chloride and cesium-adsorbed soil by surface ionization

Baba, Yuji; Shimoyama, Iwao

Photon Factory Activity Report 2017, 3 Pages, 2018/00

When a solid is heated in vacuum, a part of the surface layer desorbs as ions, which is known as "surface ionization". In this report, we present the results for surface ionization of bulk cesium chloride (CsCl). When the positive potential was applied to the sample, we found that the Cs$$^{+}$$ ions were desorbed at around 410 $$^{circ}$$C, which is lower than the melting point of CsCl (645 $$^{circ}$$C). The low desorption temperature was explained by the changes in the work function of the CsCl surface. As an application, we also investigated the desorption of Cs$$^{+}$$ ions from Cs-adsorbed soil. When Cs-adsorbed soil was heated at 460 $$^{circ}$$C for 2 hours, about 13% of Cs was desorbed as Cs$$^{+}$$ ions. The results suggest that the surface ionization would possibly be applied to the desorption of Cs from contaminated soil.

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