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JAEA Reports

None

Otagaki, Takao*; *

JNC-TJ8420 2000-016, 427 Pages, 2000/03

JNC-TJ8420-2000-016.pdf:18.18MB

no abstracts in English

JAEA Reports

None

Otagaki, Takao*

JNC-TJ1420 2000-004, 159 Pages, 2000/03

JNC-TJ1420-2000-004.pdf:4.82MB

no abstracts in English

JAEA Reports

Geochemical Site-Selection Criteria for HLW Repositories in Europe and North America

Savage, D.*; Arthur, R. C.*; Sasamoto, Hiroshi; Shibata, Masahiro; Yui, Mikazu

JNC-TN8400 2000-003, 56 Pages, 2000/01

JNC-TN8400-2000-003.pdf:1.96MB

Geochemical as well as socio-economic issues associated with the selection of potential sites to host a high-level nuclear waste repository have received considerable attention in repository programs in Europe (Belgium, Finland, France, Germany, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the U.K.) and North America (Canada and the United States), The objective of the present study is to summarize this international experience with particular emphasis on geochemical properties that factor into the adopted site-selection strategies. Results indicate that the geochemical properties of a site play a subordinate role, at best, to other geotechnical properties in the international site-selection approaches. In countries where geochemical properties are acknowledged in the site-selection approach, requirements are stated qualitatively and tend to focus on associated impacts on the stability of the engineered barrier system and on radionuclide transport. Site geochemical properties that are likely to control the lomg-term stability of geochemical conditions and radionuclide migration behavior are unspecified, however. This non-prescriptive approach may be reasonable for purposes of screeing among potential sites, but a better understanding of site properties that are most important in controlling the long-term geochemical evolution of the site over a range of possible scenarios would enable the potential sites to be ranked in terms of their suitability to host a repository.

JAEA Reports

None

JNC-TN8200 2000-001, 40 Pages, 1999/10

JNC-TN8200-2000-001.pdf:0.79MB

None

JAEA Reports

None

Arii, Yoshio

JNC-TN9200 99-009, 432 Pages, 1999/07

JNC-TN9200-99-009.pdf:17.27MB

None

JAEA Reports

None

Shigetome, Yoshiaki; ; ; ; Sato, Yoshihiko; Koyama, Tomozo

JNC-TN8200 99-001, 128 Pages, 1999/07

JNC-TN8200-99-001.pdf:92.69MB

None

JAEA Reports

None

Otagaki, Takao*

JNC-TJ1420 99-002, 138 Pages, 1999/03

JNC-TJ1420-99-002.pdf:3.87MB

no abstracts in English

JAEA Reports

None

PNC-TN1410 98-009, 400 Pages, 1998/05

PNC-TN1410-98-009.pdf:13.87MB

no abstracts in English

JAEA Reports

None

; *

PNC-TN8420 97-013, 24 Pages, 1997/10

PNC-TN8420-97-013.pdf:1.24MB

None

JAEA Reports

None

PNC-TN1420 95-023, 30 Pages, 1995/12

PNC-TN1420-95-023.pdf:1.14MB

no abstracts in English

JAEA Reports

None

PNC-TN1600 95-001, 641 Pages, 1995/05

PNC-TN1600-95-001.pdf:26.47MB

no abstracts in English

JAEA Reports

A Study of direct disposal technology in the world

*; *

PNC-TJ9222 94-003, 120 Pages, 1994/06

PNC-TJ9222-94-003.pdf:4.31MB

There are two methods of handling the spent fuel generated from the light water reactor; they are (1)direct disposal and (2)reprocessing-plutonium recycling. At present, Japan is following the line of "Reprocessing-Plutonium Recycling," but in the rest of the world, the movement for reviewing the plutonium recycling is spreading, and in the future, the world opinion and pressure from overseas countries will increase against this method. Under these circumstances, Japan must compare the two methods to clarify the meaning of plutonium recycling. For this reason, the present investigation first studied the concept and trend of spent fucl disposal in overseas countries to find out what factors were regarded as important in the spent fuel policies of various countries. Further, in the present investigation, comparative evaluations were made on the results of examinations in various countries regarding "direct disposal." Examinations have also been made as to whether there is a significant merit or demerit in direct disposal and plutonium recycling, and whether it is possible to generally apply the direct disposal method adopted in overseas countries to Japan. The investigation has revealed that there are factors such as techniques, energy, resources, economy, environment, institutions, safety, etc., which influence the spent fuel disposal policy. The five countries including the United States and Sweden, which have clearly taken up the direct disposal policy have so by laying importance on different factors according to the situations of the respective countries. Further, the comparative evaluation concerning the economy, safety, etc. has shown small difference between direct disposal and plutonium recycling and neither has any significant merit or demerit. Further, regarding the disposal concept, there are great differences according to the actual states of various countries; hence it is considered that Japan should carry out comparative evaluation of direct ...

JAEA Reports

Proceedings of plenary session international workshop on recearch & development of geological disposal

Yamato, Aiji; Sasaki, Noriaki; ; Miyahara, Kaname

PNC-TN1100 94-002, 85 Pages, 1993/11

PNC-TN1100-94-002.pdf:4.88MB

Nuclear energy is the second largest source of electric power in the United States. Tdate, nuclear power plants produced over twenty percent of the nation's electricity. Aof August 1991, there were 112 nuclear power reactors in the United States, and two mo were being built. By the year 2000, approximately 40,000 metric tons of nuclear wasteill be in temporary storage at reactor sites throughout the coutry. That amount is twi the amount that currently exists. In order to handle such waste, as well as the addedolume to be produced after the year 2000, the U. S. Department of Energt (DOE) is in t process of developing the waste management system that was authorized by the U. S Coness in 1987. The authorized system is illustrated in Figure 1. To summarize, spent nucar fuel from commercial power reactors will be accepted by the DOE at the reactor siteand transported to a monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility for temporary storagand preparation for permanent disposal in a gelogic rep

JAEA Reports

None

; ;

PNC-TN8420 92-017, 102 Pages, 1992/09

PNC-TN8420-92-017.pdf:3.28MB

None

JAEA Reports

None

Miyoshi, Masahiko*; Fujimura, Masatsune*

PNC-TJ1409 91-001, 278 Pages, 1991/02

PNC-TJ1409-91-001.pdf:9.16MB

None

JAEA Reports

None

Fujita, Tomoo

PNC-TN8420 90-001, 66 Pages, 1990/02

PNC-TN8420-90-001.pdf:1.66MB

None

JAEA Reports

None

*

PNC-TN142 84-01, 14 Pages, 1982/04

PNC-TN142-84-01.pdf:0.22MB

None

JAEA Reports

None

*

PNC-TN142 82-01, 45 Pages, 1981/07

PNC-TN142-82-01.pdf:1.0MB
PNC-TN142-82-01REV.pdf:1.3MB

None

18 (Records 1-18 displayed on this page)
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