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Journal Articles

Overview of design and R&D of test blankets in Japan

Enoeda, Mikio; Akiba, Masato; Tanaka, Satoru*; Shimizu, Akihiko*; Hasegawa, Akira*; Konishi, Satoshi*; Kimura, Akihiko*; Koyama, Akira*; Sagara, Akio*; Muroga, Takeo*

Fusion Engineering and Design, 81(1-7), p.415 - 424, 2006/02

 Times Cited Count:60 Percentile:97.02(Nuclear Science & Technology)

no abstracts in English

Journal Articles

Nuclear technology and potential ripple effect of superconducting magnets for fusion power plant

Nishimura, Arata*; Muroga, Takeo*; Takeuchi, Takao*; Nishitani, Takeo; Morioka, Atsuhiko

Fusion Engineering and Design, 81(8-14), p.1675 - 1681, 2006/02

 Times Cited Count:3 Percentile:25.6(Nuclear Science & Technology)

In a fusion reactor plant, a neutral beam injector (NBI) will be operated for a long time, and it will allow neutron streaming from NBI ports to outside of the plasma vacuum vessel. It requires the superconducting magnet to develop nuclear technology to produce stable magnetic field and to reduce activation of the magnet components. In this report, the back ground of the necessity and the contents of the nuclear technology of the superconducting magnets for fusion application are discussed and some typical investigation results are presented, which are the neutron irradiation effect on Nb$$_{3}$$Sn wire, the development of low activation superconducting wire, and the design concept to reduce nuclear heating and nuclear transformation by streaming. In addition, recent activities in high energy particle physics are introduced and potential ripple effect of the technology of the superconducting magnets is described briefly.

JAEA Reports

Compatibility of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel specimens with liquid Na and NaK in irradiation rig of IFMIF

Yutani, Toshiaki*; Nakamura, Hiroo; Sugimoto, Masayoshi

JAERI-Tech 2005-036, 10 Pages, 2005/06

JAERI-Tech-2005-036.pdf:2.06MB

In the high flux region of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), the neutron irradiation damage for iron-based alloys will exceed 20 dpa/ year. An accurate specimen temperature measurement under a large amount of nuclear heating is a key issue but the change of heat transfer of gap between irradiation specimens and specimen holder during irradiation test is inevitable, if gap is filled with an inert gas and temperature is monitored by a thermocouple buried in the specimen holder. A solution to make heat transfer predictable is to fill the gap with a liquid metal (sodium or sodium-potassium alloy). An issue of compatibility between Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic steels and the liquid metalsis addressed in this paper, and some recommendations for designing irradiation rig are presented, such as a purification control before filling liquid metals, or a careful selection of material of rig to avoid carbon mass transfer.

Journal Articles

Irradiation effects on precipitation in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels

Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Sakasegawa, Hideo*; Klueh, R. L.*

Materials Transactions, 46(3), p.469 - 474, 2005/03

 Times Cited Count:16 Percentile:71.57(Materials Science, Multidisciplinary)

The effects of irradiation on precipitation of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFs) were investigated, and its impacts on the Charpy impact properties and tensile properties were discussed. It was previously reported that RAFs (F82H-IEA and its heat treatment variant, ORNL9Cr-2WVTa, JLF-1 and 2%Ni doped F82H) shows variety of changes on its ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and yield stress after irradiation at 573K up to 5dpa. These differences could not be interpreted as an effect of irradiation hardening caused by dislocation loop formation. The precipitation behavior of the irradiated steels was examined by weight analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis and chemical analysis on extraction residues. These analyses suggested that irradiation caused (1) the increase of the amount of precipitates (mainly M$$_{23}$$C$$_{6}$$), (2) increase of Cr and decrease of W contained in precipitates, (3) disappearance of MX (TaC) in ORNL9Cr and JLF-1.

JAEA Reports

Estimation of tritium permeation through reduced-activation ferritic steel at IFMIF target backwall damaged by neutron irradiation

Matsuhiro, Kenjiro; Ando, Masami; Nakamura, Hiroo; Takeuchi, Hiroshi

JAERI-Research 2004-003, 12 Pages, 2004/03

JAERI-Research-2004-003.pdf:0.85MB

The effect of neutron irradiation damage on tritium permeation through reduced-activation ferritic steel (F82H) at IFMIF target backwall has been estimated. From the results, it has been found that the effective diffusion coefficient of hydrogen in F82H will decrease by 10 % to 20 % under neutron irradiation. Therefore, the amount of tritium permeation for several hundred seconds at the beginning of permeation will be smaller than 80 % to 90 % of that before neutron irradiation. The amount of tritium permeation of F82H at IFMIF target backwall is 1.3x10$$^{-11}$$ g/d (4.7x10$$^{3}$$ Bq/d). It is 30 times larger than that of 316SS, and is about 8 % of tritium permeation at main loop of IFMIF.

JAEA Reports

Report of the 2nd Joint Research Committee for Fusion Reactor and Materials; July 12, 2002, Tokyo, Japan

Research Committee for Fusion Reactor; Research Committee for Fusion Materials

JAERI-Review 2003-015, 123 Pages, 2003/05

JAERI-Review-2003-015.pdf:24.89MB

no abstracts in English

Journal Articles

Development of an extensive database of mechanical and physical properties for reduced-activation martensitic steel F82H

Jitsukawa, Shiro; Tamura, Manabu*; Van der Schaaf, B.*; Klueh, R. L.*; Alamo, A.*; Petersen, C.*; Schirra, M.*; Spaetig, P.*; Odette, G. R.*; Tavassoli, A. A.*; et al.

Journal of Nuclear Materials, 307-311(Part1), p.179 - 186, 2002/12

 Times Cited Count:149 Percentile:99.32(Materials Science, Multidisciplinary)

Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel is the primary candidate structural material for ITER Test Blanket Modules and DEMOnstration fusion reactor because of its excellent dimensional stability under irradiation and lower residual activity as compared with the Ni bearing steels such as the austenitic stainless steels. In this paper, microstructural features, tensile, fracture toughness, creep and fatigue properties of a reduced activation martensitic steel F82H (8Cr-2W-0.04Ta-0.1C) are reported before and after irradiation, in addition to the design concept used for development of this alloy. A large number of collaborative test results including those generated under the IEA working group implementing agreements are collected and are used to evaluate the feasibility of use of F82H steel as one of the reference alloys. The effect of metallurgical variables on the irradiation hardening is reviewed and compared with the results obtained from irradiation experiments.

JAEA Reports

Experimental study of material activation of reduced activation ferritic steel F82H by D-T neutron irradiation

Terada, Yasuaki*; Ochiai, Kentaro; Sato, Satoshi; Wada, Masayuki*; Klix, A.; Yamauchi, Michinori*; Hori, Junichi; Nishitani, Takeo

JAERI-Research 2002-019, 70 Pages, 2002/10

JAERI-Research-2002-019.pdf:8.47MB

D-T neutron irradiation experiments have been carried out with a F82H-containing breeding blanket mock-up of a fusion in order to investigate the activation characteristics of F82H low activation stainless steel. We have measured reaction rates producing 54Mn, 56Mn, 51Cr and 187W in foils of F82H, chromium and tungsten. MCNP calculations were done with evaluated nuclear data from the JENDL-3.2 and the FENDL/E-2.0 files and the results were compared with the measured values. The comparison shows that by using the current data files the reaction rates obtained from the calculations will be overestimated by up to 10-20% for 54Mn, 56Mn and 51Cr, up to 30-40% for 187W, respectively. The calculated values for tungsten are different with the evaluated nuclear data library, which shows that the neutron capture cross sections of tungsten have discrepancy in the resonance region for each nuclear data libraries.

JAEA Reports

Report of Joint Research Committee for Fusion Reactor and Materials; July 16, 2001, Tokyo, Japan

Research Committee for Fusion Reactor; Research Committee for Fusion Materials

JAERI-Review 2002-008, 79 Pages, 2002/03

JAERI-Review-2002-008.pdf:9.92MB

Joint research committee for fusion reactor and materials was held in Tokyo on July 16, 2001. In the committee, a review of the development programs and the present status on the blanket technology, materials and IFMIF(International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) in JAERI and Japanese Universities was reported, and the direction of these R&D was discussed. Moreover, the progress of the collaboration between JAERI and Japanese Universities was discussed. This report consists of the summaries of the presentations and the viewgraphs which were used at the committee.

Journal Articles

Development of high heat flux components in JAERI

Akiba, Masato; Ezato, Koichiro; Sato, Kazuyoshi; Suzuki, Satoshi; Hatano, Toshihisa

Proceedings of the 18th IEEE/NPSS Symposium on Fusion Engineering (SOFE '99), p.381 - 384, 1999/10

no abstracts in English

Journal Articles

Development of ceramic breeder blankets in Japan

Takatsu, Hideyuki; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Satoru*

Fusion Engineering and Design, 39-40, p.645 - 650, 1998/09

 Times Cited Count:17 Percentile:78.96(Nuclear Science & Technology)

no abstracts in English

Journal Articles

Development of reduced activation ferritic steels and application to fusion devices, 1; Introduction

Takatsu, Hideyuki

Purazuma, Kaku Yugo Gakkai-Shi, 74(5), p.434 - 435, 1998/05

no abstracts in English

12 (Records 1-12 displayed on this page)
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