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Journal Articles

Investigation of the impact of the prediction accuracy of the burn-up code system SWAT4.0 on neutronics calculation

Tada, Kenichi; Sakino, Takao*

Proceedings of 11th International Conference on Nuclear Criticality Safety (ICNC 2019) (Internet), 9 Pages, 2019/09

Criticality safety of the fuel debris is one of the most important issues, and the adoption of burnup credit is desired. To adopt the burnup credit, validation of the burnup calculation codes is required. In this study, assay data of the used nuclear fuel (2F2DN23, 2F1ZN2, and 2F1ZN3) are evaluated to validate the SWAT4.0 code. The calculation results revealed that the number densities of many heavy nuclides and fission products show good agreement with the experimental data. To investigate the applicability of SWAT4.0 to the criticality safety evaluation of fuel debris, we evaluated the effect of isotopic composition difference on $$k_{eff}$$. The differences in the number densities of U-235, Pu-239, Pu-241, and Sm-149 have a large impact on $$k_{eff}$$. However, the reactivity uncertainty related to the burnup analysis was less than 3%. SWAT4.0 appropriately analyses the isotopic composition of BWR fuel, and it has sufficient accuracy to be adopted in the burnup credit evaluation of fuel debris.

JAEA Reports

Analysis of post irradiation examination of used BWR fuel with SWAT4.0

Kikuchi, Takeo; Tada, Kenichi; Sakino, Takao; Suyama, Kenya

JAEA-Research 2017-021, 56 Pages, 2018/03

JAEA-Research-2017-021.pdf:2.15MB

The criticality management of the fuel debris is one of the most important research issues in Japan. The current criticality management adopts the fresh fuel assumption. The adoption of the fresh fuel assumption for the criticality control of the fuel debris is difficult because the k$$_{rm eff}$$ of the fuel debris could exceed 1.0 in most of cases which the fuel debris contains water and does not contain neutron absorbers such as gadolinium. Therefore, the adoption of the burnup credit is considered. The prediction accuracy of the isotopic composition of used nuclear fuel must be required to adopt the burnup credit for the treatment of the fuel debris. JAEA developed a burnup calculation code SWAT4.0 to obtain reference calculation results of the isotopic composition of the used nuclear fuel. This code is used to evaluate the composition of fuel debris. In order to investigate the prediction accuracy of SWAT4.0, we analyzed the PIE of BWR obtained from 2F2DN23.

Journal Articles

Analysis of used BWR fuel assay data with the integrated burnup code system SWAT4.0

Tada, Kenichi; Kikuchi, Takeo*; Sakino, Takao; Suyama, Kenya

Journal of Nuclear Science and Technology, 55(2), p.138 - 150, 2018/02

 Times Cited Count:1 Percentile:65.67(Nuclear Science & Technology)

The criticality safety of the fuel debris in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant is one of the most important issues and the adoption of the burnup credit is desired for the criticality analysis. The assay data of used nuclear fuel irradiated in 2F2 is evaluated to validate SWAT4.0 for BWR fuel burnup problem. The calculation results revealed that number density of many heavy nuclides and FPs showed good agreement with the experimental data except for $$^{235}$$U, $$^{237}$$Np, $$^{238}$$Pu and Sm isotopes. The cause of the difference is assumption of the initial number density and void ratio and overestimation of the capture cross section of $$^{237}$$Np. The C/E-1 values do not depend on the types of fuel rods (UO$$_{2}$$ or UO$$_{2}$$-Gd$$_{2}$$O$$_{3}$$) and it is similar to that for the PWR fuel. These results indicate that SWAT4.0 appropriately analyzes the isotopic composition of the BWR fuel and it has sufficient accuracy to be adopted in the burnup credit evaluation of the fuel debris.

JAEA Reports

Criticality safety evaluation for the direct disposal of used nuclear fuel; preparation of data for burnup credit evaluation (Contract research)

Yamamoto, Kento*; Akie, Hiroshi; Suyama, Kenya; Hosoyamada, Ryuji*

JAEA-Technology 2015-019, 110 Pages, 2015/10

JAEA-Technology-2015-019.pdf:3.67MB

In the direct disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF), criticality safety evaluation is one of the important issues since UNF contains some amount of fissile material. The recent development of higher-enrichment fuel has enhanced the benefit of the application of Burnup Credit. In the present study, the effects of the several parameters on the reactivity of disposal canister model were evaluated for used PWR fuel. The parameters are relevant to the uncertainties of depletion calculation code, irradiation history, and axial and horizontal burnup distribution, which are known to be important effect in the criticality safety evaluation adopting burnup credit. The latest data or methodology was adopted in this evaluation, based on the various latest studies. The appropriate margin of neutron multiplication factor in the criticality safety evaluation for UNF can be determined by adopting the methodology described in the present study.

JAEA Reports

SWAT4.0; The Integrated burnup code system driving continuous energy Monte Carlo codes MVP, MCNP and deterministic calculation code SRAC

Kashima, Takao; Suyama, Kenya; Takada, Tomoyuki*

JAEA-Data/Code 2014-028, 152 Pages, 2015/03

JAEA-Data-Code-2014-028.pdf:13.39MB

There have been two versions of SWAT depending on details of its development history: the revised SWAT that uses the deterministic calculation code SRAC as a neutron transportation solver, and the SWAT3.1 that uses the continuous energy Monte Carlo code MVP or MCNP5 for the same purpose. It takes several hours, however, to execute one calculation by the continuous energy Monte Carlo code even on the super computer of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency. Moreover, two-dimensional burnup calculation is not practical using the revised SWAT because it has problems on production of effective cross section data and applying them to arbitrary fuel geometry when a calculation model has multiple burnup zones. Therefore, SWAT4.0 has been developed by adding, to SWAT3.1, a function to utilize the deterministic code SARC2006, which has shorter calculation time, as an outer module of neutron transportation solver for burnup calculation. SWAT4.0 has been enabled to execute two-dimensional burnup calculation by providing an input data template of SRAC2006 to SWAT4.0 input data, and updating atomic number densities of burnup zones in each burnup step. This report describes outline, input data instruction, and examples of calculations of SWAT4.0.

Journal Articles

Corrections to the $$^{148}$$Nd method of evaluation of burnup for the PIE samples from Mihama-3 and Genkai-1 reactors

Suyama, Kenya; Mochizuki, Hiroki*

Annals of Nuclear Energy, 33(4), p.335 - 342, 2006/03

 Times Cited Count:8 Percentile:45.46(Nuclear Science & Technology)

The value of the burnup is one of the most important parameters of samples taken by post irradiation examination (PIE). In this study, concerning the PIE data from Mihama-3 and Genkai-1 PWRs, which were taken at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the burnup values of the PIE samples were re-evaluated and the PIE data are re-analyzed using SWAT and SWAT2 code systems with JENDL-3.3 library. This analysis concludes that the burnup values of samples from Mihama-3 and Genkai-1 PWRs should be corrected of 2-3%. The effect of re-evaluation of the burnup value on the neutron multiplication factor is approximately 1% for PIE samples having the burnup of larger than 30 GWd/t. Comparison between calculation results using a single pin cell model and an assembly model is carried out. Because the both results agreed within a few percents, we concluded that the single pin cell model is suitable for the analysis of PIE samples and the underestimation of plutonium isotopes does not result from the geometry model.

Journal Articles

Validation of integrated burnup code system SWAT2 by the analyses of isotopic composition of spent nuclear fuel

Suyama, Kenya; Mochizuki, Hiroki*; Okuno, Hiroshi; Miyoshi, Yoshinori

Proceedings of International Conference on Physics of Fuel Cycles and Advanced Nuclear Systems; Global Developments (PHYSOR 2004) (CD-ROM), 10 Pages, 2004/04

This paper provides validation results of SWAT2, the revised version of SWAT, which is a code system combining point burnup code ORIGEN2 and continuous energy Monte Carlo code MVP, by the analysis of post irradiation examinations (PIEs). Some isotopes show differences of calculation results between SWAT and SWAT2. However, generally, the differences are smaller than the error of PIE analysis that was reported in previous SWAT validation activity, and improved results are obtained for several important fission product nuclides. This study also includes comparison between an assembly and a single pin cell geometry models.

Journal Articles

Revised burnup code system SWAT; Description and validation using postirradiation examination data

Suyama, Kenya; Mochizuki, Hiroki*; Kiyosumi, Takehide*

Nuclear Technology, 138(2), p.97 - 110, 2002/05

 Times Cited Count:20 Percentile:20.3(Nuclear Science & Technology)

no abstracts in English

JAEA Reports

Reactivity effect of spent fuel depending on burn-up history

Hayashi, Takafumi*; Suyama, Kenya; Mochizuki, Hiroki*; Nomura, Yasushi

JAERI-Tech 2001-041, 158 Pages, 2001/06

JAERI-Tech-2001-041.pdf:5.15MB

no abstracts in English

JAEA Reports

Evaluation of burnup characteristics and energy deposition during NSRR pulse irradiation tests on irradiated BWR fuels

Nakamura, Takehiko; Takahashi, Masato*; Yoshinaga, Makio

JAERI-Research 2000-048, 77 Pages, 2000/11

JAERI-Research-2000-048.pdf:6.04MB

no abstracts in English

JAEA Reports

ORIGEN2 libraries based on JENDL-3.2 for LWR-MOX Fuels

Suyama, Kenya; Onoue, Masaaki*; Matsumoto, Hideki*; Sasahara, Akihiro*; Katakura, Junichi

JAERI-Data/Code 2000-036, 35 Pages, 2000/11

JAERI-Data-Code-2000-036.pdf:1.19MB

no abstracts in English

JAEA Reports

Revised SWAT; The Integrated burnup calculation code system

Suyama, Kenya; Kiyosumi, Takehide*; Mochizuki, Hiroki*

JAERI-Data/Code 2000-027, 88 Pages, 2000/07

JAERI-Data-Code-2000-027.pdf:4.08MB

no abstracts in English

JAEA Reports

A feasibility study of the particle interaction method for the flow regimes with the chemical reaction; (Report under the contract between JNC and Toshiba Corporation)

Shirakawa, Noriyuki*; *; *; *

JNC-TJ9440 2000-008, 47 Pages, 2000/03

JNC-TJ9440-2000-008.pdf:1.96MB

The numerical thermohydraulic analysis of a LMFR component should involve its whole boundaly in order to evaluate the effect of chemical reaction within it. Therefore, it becomes difficult mainly due to computing time to adopt microscopic approach for the chemical reaction directly. Thus, the thermohydraulic code is required to model the chemically reactive fluid dynamics with constitutive correlations. The reaction rate denpends on the binary contact areas between components such as continuous liquids, droplets, solid particles, and bubbles. The contact areas change sharply according to the interface state between components. Since no experiments to study the jet flow with sodium-water chemical reaction have been done, the goal of this study is to obtain the knowledge of flow regimes and contact areas by analyzing the fluid dynamics of multi-pahse and reactive components mechanistically with the particle interaction method. For the first stage of the study, the applicability of this method to the nalysis of a liquid jet into the other liquid pool was investigated. Based on the literatures, we investigated the jet flow mechanisms and analyzed the experiment of a water jet into a gasoline pool. We also analyzed SWAT3/Run19 test, the jet flow in a rod bundle, to study the applicability of the method to a complicated boundary without a chemical reaction model. The calculated fluid dynamics was in good agreement with the experiment. Furthermore, we studied and formulated the paths of phase change and chemical reaction, and conceptually designed the adopting the heat-transfer-limited phase change model and the synthesizd reaction model with a water-hydrogen conversion ratio.

JAEA Reports

Burnup calculation with estimated neutron spectrum of JMTR irradiation field; Development of the burnup calculation method for fuel pre-irradiated in the JMTR

Okonogi, Kazunari*; Nakamura, Takehiko; Yoshinaga, Makio; *

JAERI-Data/Code 99-018, 112 Pages, 1999/03

JAERI-Data-Code-99-018.pdf:4.48MB

no abstracts in English

JAEA Reports

Estimation of LWR spent fuel composition

Ando, Yoshihira*; Takano, Hideki

JAERI-Research 99-004, 270 Pages, 1999/02

JAERI-Research-99-004.pdf:21.43MB

no abstracts in English

JAEA Reports

Libraries based on JENDL-3.2 for ORIGEN2 code; ORLIBJ32

Suyama, Kenya; Katakura, Junichi; Okawachi, Yasushi*; Ishikawa, Makoto*

JAERI-Data/Code 99-003, 83 Pages, 1999/02

JAERI-Data-Code-99-003.pdf:3.47MB

no abstracts in English

Journal Articles

Studies on burnup credit at JAERI

; Nomura, Yasushi; Suyama, Kenya

Proc. of Int. Conf. on the Phys. of Nucl. Sci. and Technol., 1, p.742 - 748, 1998/00

no abstracts in English

Journal Articles

Validation of SWAT for burnup credit problems by analysis of pie of 17$$times$$17 PWR fuel assembly

Suyama, Kenya; Nakahara, Yoshinori; Kaneko, Toshiyuki*;

Proc. of PATRAM'98, 1, p.239 - 244, 1998/00

no abstracts in English

JAEA Reports

Integrated burnup calculation code system SWAT

Suyama, Kenya; *; *

JAERI-Data/Code 97-047, 128 Pages, 1997/11

JAERI-Data-Code-97-047.pdf:3.06MB

no abstracts in English

JAEA Reports

None

*; *; *; *; *; *

PNC-TJ9164 96-023, 1167 Pages, 1996/07

PNC-TJ9164-96-023.pdf:23.37MB

None

23 (Records 1-20 displayed on this page)