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Journal Articles

Long-term predictions of ambient dose equivalent rates after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

Kinase, Sakae; Takahashi, Tomoyuki*; Saito, Kimiaki

Journal of Nuclear Science and Technology, 54(12), p.1345 - 1354, 2017/12

 Times Cited Count:15 Percentile:4.02(Nuclear Science & Technology)

Journal Articles

Prediction of ambient dose equivalent rates for 30 years after the Fukushima accident and its technological development

Kinase, Sakae

Nippon Genshiryoku Gakkai-Shi, 58(6), p.362 - 366, 2016/06

no abstracts in English

Journal Articles

Uncertainty in predictions of the ambient dose equivalent rates for 30 years following the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident

Kinase, Sakae; Takahashi, Tomoyuki*; Sato, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Hideaki; Saito, Kimiaki

Proceedings of 17th NSFS Conference (Internet), p.27 - 33, 2016/02

Journal Articles

Prediction of ambient dose equivalent rates for the next 30 years after the accident

Kinase, Sakae; Takahashi, Tomoyuki*; Sato, Satoshi*; Yamamoto, Hideaki; Saito, Kimiaki

Proceedings of International Symposium on Radiological Issues for Fukushima's Revitalized Future, p.40 - 43, 2015/00

To support recovery and rehabilitation in Fukushima, prediction models have been developed for ambient dose equivalent rate distribution within the 80 km-radius around the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. The prediction models that are based on bi-exponential functions characterized by ecological half-lives of radioactive caesium for land-use, enable Fukushima residents to obtain distribution maps of ambient dose equivalent rates for the next 30 years after the accident. Model parameters were evaluated using ambient dose equivalent rates through car-borne surveys. The model parameters in deciduous and evergreen forest areas were found to be different from those in other areas. In addition, it was found that distribution maps of ambient dose equivalent rates for the next 30 years after the accident, created by the prediction models would be useful for follow-up of the radiological situation.

Journal Articles

Marine environmental assessment system of radionuclides around Japan

Kobayashi, Takuya; Togawa, Orihiko

Proceedings from the International Conference on Radioactivity in the Environment (CD-ROM), 4 Pages, 2002/09

A marine environmental assessment system STEAMER is developing for predicting the short-term (30days) dispersion and assessing the collective dose to the Japanese population due to radionuclides released to the ocean. The computer code system for short-term predictions of radionuclide dispersion is a combination of the Princeton Ocean Model (POM) for predicting ocean currents and a particle random walk model SEA-GEARN for oceanic dispersion of dissolved radionuclides. The system has been applied to a hypothetical accident of a nuclear submarine if it sinks in an offshore region around Japan, by using measured currents, temperature, salinity and meteorological regional objective analysis data (RANAL). Another computer code system DSOCEAN is also applied to the same hypothetical accident in order to compare the results of radionuclide dispersion in the ocean and the collective dose to the Japanese population. An equidistant-grid compartment model combined with a model of the geostrophic current analysis is used in DSOCEAN.

Journal Articles

A Code for predicting the migration of ground additionals: MOGRA

Amano, Hikaru; Takahashi, Tomoyuki*

Genshiryoku eye, 48(6), p.69 - 73, 2002/06

no abstracts in English

JAEA Reports

Distribution of actinide elements among various environmental factors (II)

Kudo, Akira*; *

JNC-TJ8400 2000-010, 67 Pages, 2000/02

JNC-TJ8400-2000-010.pdf:2.17MB

The first and second environmental releases of man-made $$^{239+240}$$Pu came from nuclear explosions at Alamagordo and Nagasaki in 1945. The release at Nagasaki was more serious than at Alamagordo, because it happened in an area with a high population density. Unfissioned $$^{239+240}$$Pu and various fission products have been interacting here with various environmental materials (soils, sediments, and plants) under wet and temperature conditions for more than 45 years. To assess the environmental mobility of $$^{239+240}$$Pu, the distributions of radionuclides from this release were investigated at Nishiyama where heavy black rain containing unfissioned plutonium and fission products fell 30 minutes after the nuclear explosion. The vertical distributions of $$^{137}$$Cs and $$^{239+240}$$Pu were determined in unsaturated soil cores up to 450cm deep. Most radionuclides were found in the soil column 30cm from the ground surface. However, $$^{239+240}$$Pu were detected in the groundwater as well below a depth of 200cm. No $$^{137}$$Cs was found below 40cm from the ground surface or in groundwater. These observations reveal that about 3% of the total $$^{239+240}$$Pu have been migrating in the soil at a faster rate than the remaining $$^{239+240}$$Pu. Sharp peak of $$^{137}$$Cs and $$^{239+240}$$Pu, indicating heavy deposition from the Nagasaki local fallout of 1945, were found in sediment cores collected from the Nishiyama reservoir. $$^{239+240}$$Pu peaks were unexpectedly discovered in pre-1945 sediment core sections. NO $$^{137}$$Cs was found. By contrast to the distribution in sediment cores, $$^{137}$$Cs in tree rings had spread by diffusion from the bark to the center of the tree without holding a fallout deposition record. Most of the $$^{239+240}$$Pu was distributed in the tree rings following a similar deposition record to that found in sediment cores. Furthermore, a very small amount of $$^{239+240}$$Pu (about 1%) was found unexpectedly in pre-1945 tree rings. The only reasonable ...

JAEA Reports

Phase Change Predictions for Liquid Fuel in Contact with Steel Structure using the Heat Conduction Equation

Brear, D. J.

PNC-TN9410 98-005, 53 Pages, 1998/01

PNC-TN9410-98-005.pdf:2.09MB

When liquid fuel makes contact with steel structure the liquid can freeze as a crust and the structure can melt at the surface. The melting and freezing processes that occur can influence the mode of fuel freezing and hence fuel relocation. Furthermore the temperature gradients established in the fuel and steel phases determine the rate at which heat is transferred from fuel to steel. In this memo the 1-D transient heat conduction equations are applied to the case of initially liquid UO$$_{2}$$ brought into contact with solid steel using up-to-date materials properties. The solutions predict criteria for fuel crust formation and steel melting and provide a simple algorithm to determine the interface temperature when one or both of the materials is undergoing phase change. The predicted steel melting criterion is compared with available experimental results.

JAEA Reports

None

PNC-TJ1603 97-001, 77 Pages, 1997/03

PNC-TJ1603-97-001.pdf:3.85MB

no abstracts in English

Oral presentation

Prediction of ambient dose equivalent rates within 80km radius of the Fukushima NPP

Kinase, Sakae; Murakami, Yuko; Takahashi, Tomoyuki*; Suzuki, Tadakazu*; Sugita, Takeshi*; Ando, Masaki; Mikami, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Hideaki; Saito, Kimiaki

no journal, , 

no abstracts in English

Oral presentation

Uncertainties of predicted ambient dose equivalent rates after the Fukushima accident

Kinase, Sakae; Takahashi, Tomoyuki*; Yamamoto, Hideaki; Saito, Kimiaki

no journal, , 

no abstracts in English

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