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JAEA Reports

Transfer and operation of WSPEEDI-II automatic calculation system for responses to nuclear tests by North Korea

Nemoto, Miho*; Ebine, Noriya; Okamoto, Akiko; Hosaka, Yasuhisa*; Tsuzuki, Katsunori; Terada, Hiroaki; Hayakawa, Tsuyoshi; Togawa, Orihiko

JAEA-Technology 2021-013, 41 Pages, 2021/08

JAEA-Technology-2021-013.pdf:2.52MB

When North Korea has carried out nuclear tests, Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center (NEAT) predicts atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides by using the WSPEEDI-II upon requests from Nuclear Regulation Authority (NRA) and submits the predicted results to NRA in cooperation with Nuclear Science and Engineering Center (NSEC). This is a part of the activity of NEAT supporting the Japanese Government in emergency responses. The WSPEEDI-II automatic calculation system specialized for responses to nuclear tests by North Korea was developed by NSEC and was used for responses to three nuclear tests from February 2013 to September 2017. This report describes the transfer and installation of the calculation system to NEAT, and the subsequent maintenance and operation. Future issues for responses to nuclear tests are also described in this report.

JAEA Reports

Activities on predictions of atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides for nuclear tests by North Korea

Ishizaki, Shuhei; Hayakawa, Tsuyoshi; Tsuzuki, Katsunori; Terada, Hiroaki; Togawa, Orihiko

JAEA-Technology 2018-007, 43 Pages, 2018/10

JAEA-Technology-2018-007.pdf:5.67MB

When North Korea has carried out a nuclear test, by a request from Nuclear Regulation Authority (NRA), Nuclear Emergency Assistance and Training Center (NEAT) predicts atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides by WSPEEDI-II system in cooperation with Nuclear Science and Engineering Center (NSEC), and submits the predicted results to NRA as the activity to assist responses by the Japanese Government. This report explains frameworks of the Japanese Government and Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) to cope with nuclear tests by North Korea, and describes a series of activities by NEAT regarding predictions of atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides in response to the 5th and 6th nuclear tests carried out by North Korea in September 2016 and September 2017. Future plans and issues to be solved for responses to nuclear tests are also described in this report, together with an outline of a computer program system used in the predictions.

Journal Articles

Estimation of radionuclide deposition process by cloud and fog water at mountainous area; Comparison of observed data of airborne radiation monitoring and reproduction calculation

Sanada, Yukihisa; Katata, Genki*; Kaneyasu, Naoki*

Isotope News, (759), p.18 - 21, 2018/10

no abstracts in English

Journal Articles

Development of a short-term emergency assessment system of the marine environmental radioactivity around Japan

Kobayashi, Takuya; Kawamura, Hideyuki; Fujii, Katsuji*; Kamidaira, Yuki

Journal of Nuclear Science and Technology, 54(5), p.609 - 616, 2017/05

 Times Cited Count:7 Percentile:70.7(Nuclear Science & Technology)

The Japan Atomic Energy Agency has, for many years, been developing a radionuclide dispersion model for the ocean, and has validated the model through application in many sea areas using oceanic flow fields calculated by the ocean model. The Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station accident caused marine pollution by artificial radioactive materials to the North Pacific, especially to coastal waters northeast of mainland Japan. In order to investigate the migration of radionuclides in the ocean caused by this severe accident, studies using marine dispersion simulations have been carried out by JAEA. Based on these as well as the previous studies, JAEA has developed the Short-Term Emergency Assessment system of Marine Environmental Radioactivity (STEAMER) to immediately predict the radionuclide concentration around Japan in case of a nuclear accident.

Journal Articles

Utilization of $$^{134}$$Cs/$$^{137}$$Cs in the environment to identify the reactor units that caused atmospheric releases during the Fukushima Daiichi accident

Chino, Masamichi; Terada, Hiroaki; Nagai, Haruyasu; Katata, Genki; Mikami, Satoshi; Torii, Tatsuo; Saito, Kimiaki; Nishizawa, Yukiyasu

Scientific Reports (Internet), 6, p.31376_1 - 31376_14, 2016/08

 Times Cited Count:38 Percentile:98.68(Multidisciplinary Sciences)

Oral presentation

Current status of atmospheric dispersion simulation for a nuclear accident

Nagai, Haruyasu; Terada, Hiroaki; Tanimori, Toru*

no journal, , 

no abstracts in English

Oral presentation

Hemispheric atmospheric dispersion analysis of radionuclides released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant

Furuno, Akiko; Terada, Hiroaki; Tsuzuki, Katsunori; Kadowaki, Masanao; Nagai, Haruyasu

no journal, , 

We analyzed hemispherical atmospheric dispersion of Cs-137 released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) due to the accident in March 2011, by comparing simulations with observation data from CTBT International Monitoring Systems. We used WSPEEDI-II (Worldwide version of System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Dose Information version II), which consists of the atmospheric dynamic model WRF and particle dispersion model GEARN, developed by Japan Atomic Energy Agency for atmospheric dispersion simulations. It was shown in our simulations that calculated Cs-137 concentrations generally agreed well with the measurements. By using atmospheric dispersion simulations with limited release period, we investigated release time of Cs-137 observed at CTBT stations. It was found that the Cs-137 released from March 12 to 14 was dispersed almost all over the northern hemisphere and the most of Cs-137 observed in Europe is due to the release during this period. Meanwhile, the Cs-137 released from March 17 to 19 mainly reached around the Pacific Islands area and the West Coast of the USA. These results might be useful for re-estimation of the release amount of Cs-137 from the FDNPP.

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