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Journal Articles

Morphological reproductive characteristics of testes and fertilization capacity of cryopreserved sperm after the Fukushima accident in raccoon (${it Procyon lotor}$)

Komatsu, Kazuki*; Iwasaki, Tsugumi*; Murata, Kosuke*; Yamashiro, Hideaki*; Goh, V. S. T.*; Nakayama, Ryo*; Fujishima, Yohei*; Ono, Takumi*; Kino, Yasushi*; Shimizu, Yoshinaka*; et al.

Reproduction in Domestic Animals, 56(3), p.484 - 497, 2021/03

We have established an archive system of livestock and wild animals from the surrounding ex-evacuation zone. Wildlife within the alert zone have been exposed to low-dose-rate (LDR) radiation for a long and continuous time. In this study, we analysed the morphological characteristics of the testes and in vitro fertilization (IVF) capacity of cryopreserved sperm of raccoons from the ex-evacuation zone of the FDNPP accident. This study revealed that the chronic and LDR radiation exposure associated with the FDNPP accident had no adverse effect on the reproductive characteristics and functions of male raccoons.

Journal Articles

Retreat from stress; Rattling in a planar coordination

Suekuni, Koichiro*; Lee, C. H.*; Tanaka, Hiromi*; Nishibori, Eiji*; Nakamura, Atsushi*; Kasai, Hidetaka*; Mori, Hitoshi*; Usui, Hidetomo*; Ochi, Masayuki*; Hasegawa, Takumi*; et al.

Advanced Materials, 30(13), p.1706230_1 - 1706230_6, 2018/03

 Times Cited Count:35 Percentile:90.91(Chemistry, Multidisciplinary)

Thermoelectric materials for highly efficient devices must satisfy conflicting requirements of high electrical conductivity and low thermal conductivity. In this paper, we studied the crystal structure and phonon dynamics of tetrahedrites (Cu,Zn)$$_{12}$$(Sb,As)$$_{4}$$S$$_{13}$$. The results revealed that the Cu atoms in a planar coordination are rattling, which effectively scatter phonons. These findings provide a new strategy for the development of highly efficient thermoelectric materials with planar coordination.

Journal Articles

Welding technology on sector assembly of the JT-60SA vacuum vessel

Shibama, Yusuke; Okano, Fuminori; Yagyu, Junichi; Kaminaga, Atsushi; Miyo, Yasuhiko; Hayakawa, Atsuro*; Sagawa, Keiich*; Mochida, Tsutomu*; Morimoto, Tamotsu*; Hamada, Takashi*; et al.

Fusion Engineering and Design, 98-99, p.1614 - 1619, 2015/10

 Times Cited Count:3 Percentile:32.14(Nuclear Science & Technology)

The JT-60SA vacuum vessel (150 tons) is a double wall torus structure and the maximum major radius of 5.0 m and height of 6.6 m. The manufacturing design concept is that the vessel is split in the 10 toroidal sectors manufactured at factory, and assembled on-site; seven of the 40-degree sectors, two of the 30-degree beside final one, and the final of the 20-degree. The final sector is assembled with the VV thermal shield and toroidal field magnets into the 340-degree as prepared in one sector. Sectors are temporally fitted on-site and adjusted one over the other before the assembly. After measurement of the dimensions and the reference, these sectors are transferred onto the cryostat base. First, three 80-degree sectors are manufactured with mating each 40-degree sector by direct joint welding. The rest sectors including the final sector are jointed with splice plates. Welding manipulator and its guide rails are used for these welding. In this paper, the detail of the VV sectors assembly including the final sector is explained. Welding technologies to joint the two of 40-degree sectors are reported with the present manufacturing status and the welding trial on the vertical stub with the partial mock-up of the final sector are discussed with the assembly process.

Journal Articles

Dismantlement of large fusion experimental device JT-60U

Ikeda, Yoshitaka; Okano, Fuminori; Sakasai, Akira; Hanada, Masaya; Akino, Noboru; Ichige, Hisashi; Kaminaga, Atsushi; Kiyono, Kimihiro; Kubo, Hirotaka; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; et al.

Nihon Genshiryoku Gakkai Wabun Rombunshi, 13(4), p.167 - 178, 2014/12

The JT-60U torus was disassembled so as to newly install the superconducting tokamak JT-60SA torus. The JT-60U used the deuterium for 18 years, so the disassembly project of the JT-60U was the first disassembly experience of a fusion device with radioactivation in Japan. All disassembly components were stored with recording the data such as dose rate, weight and kind of material, so as to apply the clearance level regulation in future. The lessons learned from the disassembly project indicated that the cutting technologies and storage management of disassembly components were the key factors to conduct the disassembly project in an efficient way. After completing the disassembly project, efforts have been made to analyze the data for characterizing disassembly activities, so as to contribute the estimation of manpower needs and the radioactivation of the disassembly components on other fusion devices.

Journal Articles

Safe disassembly and storage of radioactive components of JT-60U torus

Ikeda, Yoshitaka; Okano, Fuminori; Hanada, Masaya; Sakasai, Akira; Kubo, Hirotaka; Akino, Noboru; Chiba, Shinichi; Ichige, Hisashi; Kaminaga, Atsushi; Kiyono, Kimihiro; et al.

Fusion Engineering and Design, 89(9-10), p.2018 - 2023, 2014/10

 Times Cited Count:2 Percentile:19.81(Nuclear Science & Technology)

Disassembly of the JT-60U torus was started in 2009 after 18-years D$$_{2}$$ operations, and was completed in October 2012. The JT-60U torus was featured by the complicated and welded structure against the strong electromagnetic force, and by the radioactivation due to D-D reactions. Since this work is the first experience of disassembling a large radioactive fusion device in Japan, careful disassembly activities have been made. About 13,000 components cut into pieces with measuring the dose rates were removed from the torus hall and stored safely in storage facilities by using a total wokers of 41,000 person-days during 3 years. The total weight of the disassembly components reached up to 5,400 tons. Most of the disassembly components will be treated as non-radioactive ones after the clearance verification under the Japanese regulation in future. The assembly of JT-60SA has started in January 2013 after this disassembly of JT-60U torus.

Journal Articles

Neutron-sensitive ZnS/$$^{10}$$B$$_{2}$$O$$_{3}$$ ceramic scintillator detector as an alternative to a $$^{3}$$He-gas-based detector for a plutonium canister assay system

Nakamura, Tatsuya; Ozu, Akira; To, Kentaro; Sakasai, Kaoru; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Honda, Katsunori; Birumachi, Atsushi; Ebine, Masumi; Yamagishi, Hideshi*; Takase, Misao; et al.

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A, 763, p.340 - 346, 2014/05

 Times Cited Count:3 Percentile:30.04(Instruments & Instrumentation)

A neutron-sensitive ZnS/$$^{10}$$B$$_{2}$$O$$_{3}$$ ceramic scintillator detector was developed as an alternative to a $$^{3}$$He-gas-based detector for use in a plutonium canister assay system. The detector has a modular structure, with a flat ZnS/$$^{10}$$B$$_{2}$$O$$_{3}$$ceramic scintillator strip that is installed diagonally inside a light-reflecting aluminium case with a square cross section. The prototype detectors, which have a neutron-sensitive area of 30 mm $$times$$ 250 mm, exhibited a sensitivity of 21.7-23.4 $$pm$$ 0.1 cps$$/$$nv for thermal neutrons, a $$^{137}$$Cs $$gamma$$-ray sensitivity of 1.1-1.9 $$pm $$0.2 $$times$$ 10$$^{-7}$$ and a count variation of less than 6% over the detector length. A trial experiment revealed a temperature coefficient of less than -0.24$$pm$$ 0.05% / $$^{circ}$$C over the temperature range of 20-50$$^{circ}$$C.

JAEA Reports

Storage management of disassembled and radioactive components of JT-60 tokamak device; Storage of radioactive components by containers

Nishiyama, Tomokazu; Miyo, Yasuhiko; Okano, Fuminori; Sasajima, Tadayuki; Ichige, Hisashi; Kaminaga, Atsushi; Miya, Naoyuki; Sukegawa, Atsuhiko; Ikeda, Yoshitaka; Sakasai, Akira

JAEA-Technology 2014-006, 30 Pages, 2014/03

JAEA-Technology-2014-006.pdf:4.87MB

JT-60 tokamak device and the peripheral equipment were disassembled so as to be upgraded to the superconducting tokamak JT-60SA. The disassembled components were stored into storage and airtight containers at the radioactive control area. The total weight and the total number of those components are about 1,100 tons and about 11,500 except for large components. Radiation measurements and records of the radioactive components were required one by one under the law of Act on Prevention of Radiation Disease Due to Radioisotopes, etc. for the control of transport and storage from the radioactive control area to the other area. The storage management of the radioactive components was implemented by establishing the work procedure and the component management system by barcode tags. The radioactive components as many as 11,500 were surely and effectively stored under the law. The report gives the outline of the storage of JT-60 radioactive components by the storage containers.

JAEA Reports

Disassembly of JT-60 tokamak device and ancillary facilities for JT-60 tokamak

Okano, Fuminori; Ichige, Hisashi; Miyo, Yasuhiko; Kaminaga, Atsushi; Sasajima, Tadayuki; Nishiyama, Tomokazu; Yagyu, Junichi; Ishige, Yoichi; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Komuro, Kenichi; et al.

JAEA-Technology 2014-003, 125 Pages, 2014/03

JAEA-Technology-2014-003.pdf:13.32MB

The disassembly of JT-60 tokamak device and its peripheral equipments, where the total weight was about 5400 tons, started in 2009 and accomplished in October 2012. This disassembly was required process for JT-60SA project, which is the Satellite Tokamak project under Japan-EU international corroboration to modify the JT-60 to the superconducting tokamak. This work was the first experience of disassembling a large radioactive fusion device based on Radiation Hazard Prevention Act in Japan. The cutting was one of the main problems in this disassembly, such as to cut the wielded parts together with toroidal field coils, and to cut the vacuum vessel into two. After solving these problems, the disassembly completed without disaster and accident. This report presents the outline of the JT-60 disassembly, especially tokamak device and ancillary facilities for tokamak device.

Journal Articles

A Position-sensitive tubular scintillator-based detector as an alternative to a $$^{3}$$He-gas-based detector for neutron-scattering instruments

Nakamura, Tatsuya; Katagiri, Masaki*; To, Kentaro; Honda, Katsunori; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Ebine, Masumi; Birumachi, Atsushi; Sakasai, Kaoru; Soyama, Kazuhiko

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A, 741, p.42 - 46, 2014/03

 Times Cited Count:6 Percentile:50.1(Instruments & Instrumentation)

A position-sensitive tubular scintillator-based neutron detector is proposed as an alternative to a $$^{3}$$He-gas-based detector. The detector has a neutron-detecting element constructed from rolled ZnS/$$^{6}$$LiF scintillator screens that sandwich wavelength-shifting (WLS) fibre coils (SFC element). Multiple SFC elements are enclosed in an aluminium tube in a row to form a one-dimensional position-sensitive neutron detector. The design of the WLS fibre coil, which was determined by performing basic experiments, comprised two 0.75-mm-diameter WLS fibres wound in parallel at a pitch of 1.5 mm. A 64-element detector with a pixel size of 22 mm $$times$$ 20 mm (width $$times$$ length) successfully demonstrated the detection principle. The tubular shape of the new detector is similar to the usual 25-mm-diameter $$^{3}$$He tube, making this an alternative detector with the potential to be installed in a vacuum tank for inelastic-neutron-scattering instruments.

Journal Articles

A Scintillator-based detector with sub-100-$$mu$$m spatial resolution comprising a fibre-optic taper with wavelength-shifting fibre readout for time-of-flight neutron imaging

Nakamura, Tatsuya; To, Kentaro; Kawasaki, Takuro; Honda, Katsunori; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Ebine, Masumi; Birumachi, Atsushi; Sakasai, Kaoru; Soyama, Kazuhiko; Katagiri, Masaki*

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A, 737, p.176 - 183, 2014/02

 Times Cited Count:11 Percentile:72.25(Instruments & Instrumentation)

Journal Articles

Detector system of the $$SENJU$$ single-crystal time-of-flight neutron diffractometer at J-PARC/MLF

Kawasaki, Takuro; Nakamura, Tatsuya; To, Kentaro; Hosoya, Takaaki*; Oikawa, Kenichi; Ohara, Takashi; Kiyanagi, Ryoji; Ebine, Masumi; Birumachi, Atsushi; Sakasai, Kaoru; et al.

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A, 735, p.444 - 451, 2014/01

 Times Cited Count:16 Percentile:83.34(Instruments & Instrumentation)

JAEA Reports

Assembly work and transport of JT-60SA cryostat base

Okano, Fuminori; Masaki, Kei; Yagyu, Junichi; Shibama, Yusuke; Sakasai, Akira; Miyo, Yasuhiko; Kaminaga, Atsushi; Nishiyama, Tomokazu; Suzuki, Sadaaki; Nakamura, Shigetoshi; et al.

JAEA-Technology 2013-032, 32 Pages, 2013/11

JAEA-Technology-2013-032.pdf:8.86MB

Japan Atomic Energy Agency started to construct a fully superconducting tokamak experiment device, JT-60SA, to support the ITER since January, 2013 at the Fusion Research and Development Directorate in Naka, Japan. The JT-60SA will be constructed with enhancing the previous JT-60 infrastructures, in the JT-60 torus hall, where the ex-JT-60 machine was disassembled. The JT-60SA Cryostat Base, for base of the entire tokamak structure, were assembly as first step of this construction. The Cryostat Base (CB, 250 tons) is consists of 7 main made of stainless steel, 12m diameter and 3m height. It was built in the Spain and transported to the Naka site with the seven major parts split, via Hitachi port. The assembly work of these steps, preliminary measurements, sole plate adjustments of its height and flatness, and assembly of the CB. Introduces the concrete result of assembly work and transport of JT-60SA cryostat base.

JAEA Reports

Disassembly of JT-60 tokamak device

Okano, Fuminori; Ikeda, Yoshitaka; Sakasai, Akira; Hanada, Masaya; Ichige, Hisashi; Miyo, Yasuhiko; Kaminaga, Atsushi; Sasajima, Tadayuki; Nishiyama, Tomokazu; Yagyu, Junichi; et al.

JAEA-Technology 2013-031, 42 Pages, 2013/11

JAEA-Technology-2013-031.pdf:18.1MB

The disassembly of JT-60 tokamak device and its peripheral equipments, where the total weight was about 6200 tons, started in 2009 and accomplished in October 2012. This disassembly was required process for JT-60SA project, which is the Satellite Tokamak project under Japan-EU international corroboration to modify the JT-60 to the superconducting tokamak. This work was the first experience of disassembling a large radioactive fusion device based on Radiation Hazard Prevention Act in Japan. The cutting was one of the main problems in this disassembly, such as to cut the wielded parts together with toroidal field coils, and to cut the vacuum vessel into two. After solving these problems, the disassembly completed without disaster and accident. This report presents the outline of the JT-60 disassembly, especially tokamak device.

Journal Articles

Design study of JT-60SA vacuum pumping system

Kaminaga, Atsushi; Matsunaga, Go; Masaki, Kei; Sakasai, Akira

Heisei-24-Nendo Kyoto Daigaku Sogo Gijutsu Kenkyukai Hokokusho (CD-ROM), 4 Pages, 2013/03

no abstracts in English

Journal Articles

Fundamental welding R&D results for manufacturing vacuum vessel of JT-60SA

Asano, Shiro*; Okuyama, Toshihisa*; Onawa, Toshio*; Yanagi, Yutaka*; Ejiri, Mitsuru*; Kanahara, Toshio*; Ichihashi, Koji*; Kikuchi, Atsushi*; Mizumaki, Shoichi*; Masaki, Kei; et al.

Fusion Engineering and Design, 86(9-11), p.1816 - 1820, 2011/10

 Times Cited Count:11 Percentile:69.09(Nuclear Science & Technology)

The real vacuum vessel (VV) manufacturing of JT-60SA has started since Nov. 2009 at Toshiba. Prior to starting manufacturing, fundamental welding R&Ds had been performed by three stages. In the first stage, primary tests for screening welding method were performed. In the second stage, the trial welding for 1m-long straight and curved double shell samples were conducted. The dependences of welding quality and distortion on the welding conditions, such as arc voltage and current, setting accuracy, welding sequence, the shape of grooves, etc. were measured. In addition, welding condition with low heat input was explored. In the last stage, fabrication sequence was confirmed and established by the trial manufacturing of the 20$$^{circ}$$ upper half mock-up. This poster presents the R&D results obtained in the first and second stages.

Journal Articles

Optimization of ion-beam irradiation for mutagenesis in soybean; Effects on plant growth and production of visibly altered mutants

Arase, Sachiko*; Hase, Yoshihiro; Abe, Jun*; Kasai, Megumi*; Yamada, Tetsuya*; Kitamura, Keisuke*; Narumi, Issei; Tanaka, Atsushi; Kanazawa, Akira*

Plant Biotechnology, 28(3), p.323 - 329, 2011/06

 Times Cited Count:17 Percentile:54.04(Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology)

Journal Articles

Aspire to become TAKUMI; TAKUMI present status and research topics

Harjo, S.; Aizawa, Kazuya; Ito, Takayoshi; Arima, Hiroshi; Abe, Jun; Moriai, Atsushi; Sakasai, Kaoru; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Nakatani, Takeshi; Iwahashi, Takaaki; et al.

Materials Science Forum, 652, p.99 - 104, 2010/09

 Times Cited Count:20 Percentile:99.49

The construction of The Engineering Materials Diffractometer, TAKUMI of J-PARC has been finished on March 2009, and the commissioning has been started from September 2008 being parallel with the final stage of the construction. In the commissioning, after checking the validity and the stability of the detectors and the data acquisition system, we checked powder diffraction data of a 2 mm diameter of annealed piano wire with combination of beam collimation (high resolution mode), and confirmed that resolution $$Delta$$$$d$$/$$d$$ of less than 0.2% can be achieved. We also reports preliminary results from researches using TAKUMI.

Journal Articles

Wavelength-shifting-fibre-based neutron image detector with a fibre-optic taper to increase the spatial resolution

Nakamura, Tatsuya; Katagiri, Masaki; To, Kentaro; Sakasai, Kaoru; Ebine, Masumi; Birumachi, Atsushi; Soyama, Kazuhiko

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A, 604(1-2), p.158 - 160, 2009/06

 Times Cited Count:6 Percentile:45.46(Instruments & Instrumentation)

The effective pixel size of a two-dimensional wavelength-shifting-fibre (WLS-fibre)-based neutron image detector was improved from 0.5 to 0.16 mm by including a fibre-optic taper (FOT) between the scintillator screen and the WLS fibre. The WLS-fibre-based detector consisted of a thin ZnS/$$^{6}$$LiF screen, a FOT and WLS ribbons crossed in the x and y directions. The demonstrator detector had 16 fibre channels in each direction, and the light signals in each fibre were read out individually. The FOT was constructed from fine glass fibres with a taper ratio of 3.1, and served as an image magnifier. The prototype detector equipped with the FOT exhibited a spatial resolution of 0.3 mm, compared to the spatial resolution of 0.8 mm for the original detector without the FOT.

Journal Articles

Engineering design and R&D of impurity influx monitor (divertor) for ITER

Ogawa, Hiroaki; Sugie, Tatsuo; Kasai, Satoshi*; Katsunuma, Atsushi*; Hara, Hirotsugu*; Takeyama, Norihide*; Kusama, Yoshinori

Fusion Engineering and Design, 83(10-12), p.1405 - 1409, 2008/12

 Times Cited Count:12 Percentile:65.48(Nuclear Science & Technology)

no abstracts in English

Journal Articles

Conceptual design of JT-60SA cryostat

Shibama, Yusuke; Sakurai, Shinji; Masaki, Kei; Sukegawa, Atsuhiko; Kaminaga, Atsushi; Sakasai, Akira; Matsukawa, Makoto

Fusion Engineering and Design, 83(10-12), p.1605 - 1609, 2008/12

 Times Cited Count:5 Percentile:37.69(Nuclear Science & Technology)

The conceptual design of JT-60SA cryostat is summarized. JT-60SA is designed to be a fully superconducting device and assumed deuterium operation, therefore a cryostat is introduced to secure three functions, which are thermal insulation for entire superconducting magnets, bio-shielding, and gravity support for the entire tokamak device. The cryostat is required to cover up the tokamak devices, which are 15 m of total height and 7 m of radius, and to support the total devices weight of 2550 tons. The cryostat consists of vessel body, gravity support and auxiliary facilities, such as 80 K thermal shield and exhaust system. Each of them is outlined with JT-60SA design conditions, and the operational condition of auxiliary system is clarified, especially, capacity of the exhaust system, which is related to the 80 K thermal shield design.

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