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Journal Articles

Development of remote pipe welding tool for divertor cassettes in JT-60SA

Hayashi, Takao; Sakurai, Shinji; Sakasai, Akira; Shibanuma, Kiyoshi; Kono, Wataru*; Onawa, Toshio*; Matsukage, Takeshi*

Fusion Engineering and Design, 101, p.180 - 185, 2015/12

 Times Cited Count:1 Percentile:85.07(Nuclear Science & Technology)

Remote pipe welding tool accessing from inside pipe has been newly developed for JT-60SA. Remote handling (RH) system is necessary for the maintenance and repair of in-vessel components such as lower divertor cassettes in JT-60SA. Cooling pipes, which connects between the divertor cassette and the vacuum vessel with bellows are required to be cut and welded in the vacuum vessel by RH system. The available space for RH system is very limited inside the vacuum vessel, especially around the divertor cassettes. Thus, the cooling pipes are required to be cut and weld from the inside in the vacuum vessel. The inner diameter, thickness and material of the cooling pipe are 54.2 mm, 2.8 mm and SUS316L, respectively. An upper pipe connected to the divertor cassette has a jut on the edge to fill the gap between pipes. Owing to the jut and two-times welding, the welding tool achieved the maximum allowable gap of 0.7 mm.

Journal Articles

Welding technology on sector assembly of the JT-60SA vacuum vessel

Shibama, Yusuke; Okano, Fuminori; Yagyu, Junichi; Kaminaga, Atsushi; Miyo, Yasuhiko; Hayakawa, Atsuro*; Sagawa, Keiich*; Mochida, Tsutomu*; Morimoto, Tamotsu*; Hamada, Takashi*; et al.

Fusion Engineering and Design, 98-99, p.1614 - 1619, 2015/10

 Times Cited Count:2 Percentile:72.15(Nuclear Science & Technology)

The JT-60SA vacuum vessel (150 tons) is a double wall torus structure and the maximum major radius of 5.0 m and height of 6.6 m. The manufacturing design concept is that the vessel is split in the 10 toroidal sectors manufactured at factory, and assembled on-site; seven of the 40-degree sectors, two of the 30-degree beside final one, and the final of the 20-degree. The final sector is assembled with the VV thermal shield and toroidal field magnets into the 340-degree as prepared in one sector. Sectors are temporally fitted on-site and adjusted one over the other before the assembly. After measurement of the dimensions and the reference, these sectors are transferred onto the cryostat base. First, three 80-degree sectors are manufactured with mating each 40-degree sector by direct joint welding. The rest sectors including the final sector are jointed with splice plates. Welding manipulator and its guide rails are used for these welding. In this paper, the detail of the VV sectors assembly including the final sector is explained. Welding technologies to joint the two of 40-degree sectors are reported with the present manufacturing status and the welding trial on the vertical stub with the partial mock-up of the final sector are discussed with the assembly process.

Journal Articles

Numerical evaluation of the light transport properties of alternative He-3 neutron detectors using ceramic scintillators

Ozu, Akira; Takase, Misao*; Haruyama, Mitsuo; Kurata, Noritaka*; Kobayashi, Nozomi*; Kureta, Masatoshi; Nakamura, Tatsuya; To, Kentaro; Sakasai, Kaoru; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; et al.

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A, 798, p.62 - 69, 2015/10

 Times Cited Count:2 Percentile:72.15(Instruments & Instrumentation)

The light transport properties of scintillator light inside alternative He-3 neutron detector modules using scintillator sheets have been investigated by a ray-tracing simulation code. The detector module consists of a light-reflecting tube, a thin rectangular ceramic scintillator sheet laminated on a glass plate, and two photo-multiplier tubes (PMTs) mounted at both ends of the detector tube. The light induced on the surface of the scintillator sheet via nuclear interaction between the scintillator and neutrons are detected by the two PMTs. The light output of various detector modules in which the scintillator sheets are installed with several different arrangements were examined and evaluated in comparison with experimental results. The results derived from the simulation reveal that the light transport property is strongly dependent on the arrangement of the scintillator sheet inside the tube and the shape of the tube.

Journal Articles

Mechanical properties on closure welding for JT-60SA cryostat

Shibama, Yusuke; Nakamura, Shigetoshi; Masaki, Kei; Sakasai, Akira

Proceedings of 23rd International Conference on Nuclear Engineering (ICONE-23) (DVD-ROM), 5 Pages, 2015/05

The cryostat, made of type 304 stainless steel, is required to fulfil the structural integrity and the vacuum tightness at room temperature, and this paper focuses on the fillet welding mechanical properties as a vacuum seal, especially tensile behavior and fatigue strength. Although the lid at the top is a first major part to be removed when the devices inside would be stated in faulted conditions, the closure process is expected to be low cost and simple, and examined with structural clamping and fillet welding as a vacuum seal since the cryostat is not an usual pressure vessel. This standard strength is designed as a 12 mm leg length and reduction of the welding deposition is surveyed with the other comparative specimens of two leg lengths (6 mm, 9 mm). As a result, the region linearly responded to the loading of the 9 mm specimen sufficiently envelops the standard design strength, and then sufficient fatigue strength is confirmed with the linear response limit load as an amplitude until 2000 cycles. Application of the fillet welding to the closure welding is discussed in this paper.

Journal Articles

Dismantlement of large fusion experimental device JT-60U

Ikeda, Yoshitaka; Okano, Fuminori; Sakasai, Akira; Hanada, Masaya; Akino, Noboru; Ichige, Hisashi; Kaminaga, Atsushi; Kiyono, Kimihiro; Kubo, Hirotaka; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; et al.

Nippon Genshiryoku Gakkai Wabun Rombunshi, 13(4), p.167 - 178, 2014/12

The JT-60U torus was disassembled so as to newly install the superconducting tokamak JT-60SA torus. The JT-60U used the deuterium for 18 years, so the disassembly project of the JT-60U was the first disassembly experience of a fusion device with radioactivation in Japan. All disassembly components were stored with recording the data such as dose rate, weight and kind of material, so as to apply the clearance level regulation in future. The lessons learned from the disassembly project indicated that the cutting technologies and storage management of disassembly components were the key factors to conduct the disassembly project in an efficient way. After completing the disassembly project, efforts have been made to analyze the data for characterizing disassembly activities, so as to contribute the estimation of manpower needs and the radioactivation of the disassembly components on other fusion devices.

Journal Articles

Infrared thermography inspection for monoblock divertor target in JT-60SA

Nakamura, Shigetoshi; Sakurai, Shinji; Ozaki, Hidetsugu; Seki, Yohji; Yokoyama, Kenji; Sakasai, Akira; Tsuru, Daigo

Fusion Engineering and Design, 89(7-8), p.1024 - 1028, 2014/10

 Times Cited Count:3 Percentile:66.24(Nuclear Science & Technology)

Carbon Fiber Composite mono-block divertor target is required for power handling in JT-60SA. Heat removal capability of the target is degraded by joint defect which is induced in manufacturing process. For screening heat removal capability, infrared thermography inspection (IR inspection) is improved an accuracy for the target using threaded cooling tube. In IR inspection, the targets heated at 95$$^{circ}$$C by hot water in steady state condition are instantaneously cooled down by cold water flow of 5$$^{circ}$$C in three channels of test section. The heat removal capability of the targets is evaluated with comparing the transient thermal response time between defect-free and tested targets. A construction of a database for a correlation between the known defects, maximum surface temperatures in the heat load test and the IR inspection are successfully completed. Screening criteria is set with finite element methods based on the database.

Journal Articles

Development of remote pipe cutting tool for divertor cassettes in JT-60SA

Hayashi, Takao; Sakurai, Shinji; Shibanuma, Kiyoshi; Sakasai, Akira

Fusion Engineering and Design, 89(9-10), p.2299 - 2303, 2014/10

 Times Cited Count:5 Percentile:49.3(Nuclear Science & Technology)

Remote handling (RH) system is necessary for the maintenance and repair of in-vessel components of JT-60SA. Design study of RH system, focusing on the deployment of remote pipe cutting tool for JT-60SA divertor cassette is reported in this conference. Some cooling pipes on the outboard side in the divertor cassette should be cut and welded in the vacuum vessel. The outer diameter, thickness and material of the cooling pipe is 59.7 mm, 2.7 mm and SUS316L, respectively. Cutting tool head equips a disk cutter blade and rollers which are subjected to the reaction force. The cooling pipe is cut by rotating the cutting tool head with pushing out the disk cutter blade. Newly developed cutting tool indicates that the cooling pipe is cut by pushing out the disk cutter blade up to 30.5 mm in radius, i.e. 61 mm in diameter.

Journal Articles

Safe disassembly and storage of radioactive components of JT-60U torus

Ikeda, Yoshitaka; Okano, Fuminori; Hanada, Masaya; Sakasai, Akira; Kubo, Hirotaka; Akino, Noboru; Chiba, Shinichi; Ichige, Hisashi; Kaminaga, Atsushi; Kiyono, Kimihiro; et al.

Fusion Engineering and Design, 89(9-10), p.2018 - 2023, 2014/10

 Times Cited Count:2 Percentile:76.58(Nuclear Science & Technology)

Disassembly of the JT-60U torus was started in 2009 after 18-years D$$_{2}$$ operations, and was completed in October 2012. The JT-60U torus was featured by the complicated and welded structure against the strong electromagnetic force, and by the radioactivation due to D-D reactions. Since this work is the first experience of disassembling a large radioactive fusion device in Japan, careful disassembly activities have been made. About 13,000 components cut into pieces with measuring the dose rates were removed from the torus hall and stored safely in storage facilities by using a total wokers of 41,000 person-days during 3 years. The total weight of the disassembly components reached up to 5,400 tons. Most of the disassembly components will be treated as non-radioactive ones after the clearance verification under the Japanese regulation in future. The assembly of JT-60SA has started in January 2013 after this disassembly of JT-60U torus.

Journal Articles

Disassembly of JT-60 tokamak device for JT-60SA Project; Disassembly of radioactivated large structures

Okano, Fuminori; Ikeda, Yoshitaka; Sakasai, Akira; Hanada, Masaya; JT-60 Team

Purazuma, Kaku Yugo Gakkai-Shi, 90(10), p.630 - 639, 2014/10

JT-60 tokamak device, as a largest nuclear fusion device in the world, started the experiments since 1985 and had accomplished the research and development of plasma performance toward the DEMO. The project has successfully completed it operation in August 2008 with many results such as accomplishment of break-even plasma condition in 1996. This disassembly was required for JT-60SA project, which is the Satellite Tokamak project under Japan-EU international corroboration to modify the JT-60 to the superconducting tokamak. This work was the first experience of disassembling a large radioactive fusion device based on Radiation Hazard Prevention Act in Japan. This report presents the outline of disassembly of JT-60 tokamak device.

Journal Articles

Assembly metrology for JT-60SA using the laser tracker

Nishiyama, Tomokazu; Yagyu, Junichi; Nakamura, Shigetoshi; Masaki, Kei; Okano, Fuminori; Sakasai, Akira

Heisei-26-Nendo Hokkaido Daigaku Sogo Gijutsu Kenkyukai Hokokushu (DVD-ROM), 6 Pages, 2014/09

no abstracts in English

Journal Articles

Development and demonstration of a Pu NDA system using ZnS/$$^{10}$$B$$_{2}$$O$$_{3}$$ ceramic scintillator detectors

Nakamura, Hironobu; Ozu, Akira; Kobayashi, Nozomi*; Mukai, Yasunobu; Sakasai, Kaoru; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Soyama, Kazuhiko; Kureta, Masatoshi; Kurita, Tsutomu; Seya, Michio

Proceedings of INMM 55th Annual Meeting (Internet), 9 Pages, 2014/07

To establish an alternative technique of He-3 neutron detector that is used for nuclear material accountancy and safeguards, we have started an R&D project to develop a new type of neutron detector (Pu NDA system) using ZnS/$$^{10}$$B$$_{2}$$O$$_{3}$$ ceramic scintillator with support of Japanese government. The design of the alternative system (ASAS: Alternative Sample Assay System) is basically referenced from INVS (INVentory Sample assay system) which is passive neutron assay system of plutonium and has total 18 He-3 tubes (about 42% of counting efficiency), and the small amount of Pu in the MOX powder or Pu nitrate solution in a vial can be measured. In order to establish the technology and performance after the fabrication of the new detector progresses, we are planning to conduct demonstration activity in the early 2015 experimentally. The demonstration activity implements the confirmation of reproducibility about sample positioning, optimization of detector parameters, counting statistical uncertainty, stability (temperature and $$gamma$$-ray change) check and figure of merit (FOM) using check source and actual MOX powder. In addition to that, performance comparison between current INVS and the ASAS are also conducted. In this paper, we present some analytical study results using a Monte-Carlo simulation code (MCNP), entire ASAS design and demonstration plan to prove technology and performance.

Journal Articles

Neutron-sensitive ZnS/$$^{10}$$B$$_{2}$$O$$_{3}$$ ceramic scintillator detector as an alternative to a $$^{3}$$He-gas-based detector for a plutonium canister assay system

Nakamura, Tatsuya; Ozu, Akira; To, Kentaro; Sakasai, Kaoru; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Honda, Katsunori; Birumachi, Atsushi; Ebine, Masumi; Yamagishi, Hideshi*; Takase, Misao; et al.

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A, 763, p.340 - 346, 2014/05

 Times Cited Count:2 Percentile:75.6(Instruments & Instrumentation)

A neutron-sensitive ZnS/$$^{10}$$B$$_{2}$$O$$_{3}$$ ceramic scintillator detector was developed as an alternative to a $$^{3}$$He-gas-based detector for use in a plutonium canister assay system. The detector has a modular structure, with a flat ZnS/$$^{10}$$B$$_{2}$$O$$_{3}$$ceramic scintillator strip that is installed diagonally inside a light-reflecting aluminium case with a square cross section. The prototype detectors, which have a neutron-sensitive area of 30 mm $$times$$ 250 mm, exhibited a sensitivity of 21.7-23.4 $$pm$$ 0.1 cps$$/$$nv for thermal neutrons, a $$^{137}$$Cs $$gamma$$-ray sensitivity of 1.1-1.9 $$pm $$0.2 $$times$$ 10$$^{-7}$$ and a count variation of less than 6% over the detector length. A trial experiment revealed a temperature coefficient of less than -0.24$$pm$$ 0.05% / $$^{circ}$$C over the temperature range of 20-50$$^{circ}$$C.

JAEA Reports

Storage management of disassembled and radioactive components of JT-60 tokamak device; Storage of radioactive components by containers

Nishiyama, Tomokazu; Miyo, Yasuhiko; Okano, Fuminori; Sasajima, Tadayuki; Ichige, Hisashi; Kaminaga, Atsushi; Miya, Naoyuki; Sukegawa, Atsuhiko; Ikeda, Yoshitaka; Sakasai, Akira

JAEA-Technology 2014-006, 30 Pages, 2014/03

JAEA-Technology-2014-006.pdf:4.87MB

JT-60 tokamak device and the peripheral equipment were disassembled so as to be upgraded to the superconducting tokamak JT-60SA. The disassembled components were stored into storage and airtight containers at the radioactive control area. The total weight and the total number of those components are about 1,100 tons and about 11,500 except for large components. Radiation measurements and records of the radioactive components were required one by one under the law of Act on Prevention of Radiation Disease Due to Radioisotopes, etc. for the control of transport and storage from the radioactive control area to the other area. The storage management of the radioactive components was implemented by establishing the work procedure and the component management system by barcode tags. The radioactive components as many as 11,500 were surely and effectively stored under the law. The report gives the outline of the storage of JT-60 radioactive components by the storage containers.

JAEA Reports

Disassembly of JT-60 tokamak device and ancillary facilities for JT-60 tokamak

Okano, Fuminori; Ichige, Hisashi; Miyo, Yasuhiko; Kaminaga, Atsushi; Sasajima, Tadayuki; Nishiyama, Tomokazu; Yagyu, Junichi; Ishige, Yoichi; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Komuro, Kenichi; et al.

JAEA-Technology 2014-003, 125 Pages, 2014/03

JAEA-Technology-2014-003.pdf:13.32MB

The disassembly of JT-60 tokamak device and its peripheral equipments, where the total weight was about 5400 tons, started in 2009 and accomplished in October 2012. This disassembly was required process for JT-60SA project, which is the Satellite Tokamak project under Japan-EU international corroboration to modify the JT-60 to the superconducting tokamak. This work was the first experience of disassembling a large radioactive fusion device based on Radiation Hazard Prevention Act in Japan. The cutting was one of the main problems in this disassembly, such as to cut the wielded parts together with toroidal field coils, and to cut the vacuum vessel into two. After solving these problems, the disassembly completed without disaster and accident. This report presents the outline of the JT-60 disassembly, especially tokamak device and ancillary facilities for tokamak device.

Journal Articles

Disassembly of JT-60 tokamak device

Okano, Fuminori; Ikeda, Yoshitaka; Sakasai, Akira; Hanada, Masaya; JT-60 Team

NIFS-MEMO-67, p.344 - 352, 2014/02

no abstracts in English

Journal Articles

Evaluation of light transport property in alternative He-3 neutron detectors using ceramic scintillators by a ray-tracing simulation

Ozu, Akira; Takase, Misao*; Kurata, Noritaka*; Kobayashi, Nozomi*; Tobita, Hiroshi; Haruyama, Mitsuo; Kureta, Masatoshi; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; To, Kentaro; et al.

Proceedings of 2014 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference; 21st International Symposium on Room-Temperature Semiconductor X-ray and $$gamma$$-ray detectors (NSS/MIC 2014), 5 Pages, 2014/00

In Japan Atomic Energy Agency, the helium-3 alternative neutron detector using ceramic scintillators for nuclear safeguards is under development with the support of the government. The alternative detector module consists of four components: an aluminum regular square tube, a light reflecting foil put on the inner surface of the square tube, a rectangular scintillator sheet sintered on a glass plate, and two PMTs provided at both ends of the tube. The scintillator sheet is fit on the diagonal inside the square tube. The light transport property of scintillator lights inside the tube influences on the fundamental performance of the alternative detector. Therefore, the properties of the lights emitted on the surface of the scintillator sheet and scintillation lights passing through the glass plate to the PMTs in several arrangements of the scintillator in the tubes were investigated with a ray-tracing simulation. The results are described in comparison with the experimental results.

JAEA Reports

Assembly work and transport of JT-60SA cryostat base

Okano, Fuminori; Masaki, Kei; Yagyu, Junichi; Shibama, Yusuke; Sakasai, Akira; Miyo, Yasuhiko; Kaminaga, Atsushi; Nishiyama, Tomokazu; Suzuki, Sadaaki; Nakamura, Shigetoshi; et al.

JAEA-Technology 2013-032, 32 Pages, 2013/11

JAEA-Technology-2013-032.pdf:8.86MB

Japan Atomic Energy Agency started to construct a fully superconducting tokamak experiment device, JT-60SA, to support the ITER since January, 2013 at the Fusion Research and Development Directorate in Naka, Japan. The JT-60SA will be constructed with enhancing the previous JT-60 infrastructures, in the JT-60 torus hall, where the ex-JT-60 machine was disassembled. The JT-60SA Cryostat Base, for base of the entire tokamak structure, were assembly as first step of this construction. The Cryostat Base (CB, 250 tons) is consists of 7 main made of stainless steel, 12m diameter and 3m height. It was built in the Spain and transported to the Naka site with the seven major parts split, via Hitachi port. The assembly work of these steps, preliminary measurements, sole plate adjustments of its height and flatness, and assembly of the CB. Introduces the concrete result of assembly work and transport of JT-60SA cryostat base.

JAEA Reports

Disassembly of JT-60 tokamak device

Okano, Fuminori; Ikeda, Yoshitaka; Sakasai, Akira; Hanada, Masaya; Ichige, Hisashi; Miyo, Yasuhiko; Kaminaga, Atsushi; Sasajima, Tadayuki; Nishiyama, Tomokazu; Yagyu, Junichi; et al.

JAEA-Technology 2013-031, 42 Pages, 2013/11

JAEA-Technology-2013-031.pdf:18.1MB

The disassembly of JT-60 tokamak device and its peripheral equipments, where the total weight was about 6200 tons, started in 2009 and accomplished in October 2012. This disassembly was required process for JT-60SA project, which is the Satellite Tokamak project under Japan-EU international corroboration to modify the JT-60 to the superconducting tokamak. This work was the first experience of disassembling a large radioactive fusion device based on Radiation Hazard Prevention Act in Japan. The cutting was one of the main problems in this disassembly, such as to cut the wielded parts together with toroidal field coils, and to cut the vacuum vessel into two. After solving these problems, the disassembly completed without disaster and accident. This report presents the outline of the JT-60 disassembly, especially tokamak device.

Journal Articles

Assembly study for JT-60SA tokamak

Shibanuma, Kiyoshi; Arai, Takashi; Hasegawa, Koichi; Hoshi, Ryo; Kamiya, Koji; Kawashima, Hisato; Kubo, Hirotaka; Masaki, Kei; Saeki, Hisashi; Sakurai, Shinji; et al.

Fusion Engineering and Design, 88(6-8), p.705 - 710, 2013/10

 Times Cited Count:8 Percentile:34.7(Nuclear Science & Technology)

Journal Articles

Welding technology R&D on port joint of JT-60SA vacuum vessel

Shibama, Yusuke; Masaki, Kei; Sakurai, Shinji; Shibanuma, Kiyoshi; Sakasai, Akira; Onawa, Toshio*; Araki, Takao*; Asano, Shiro*

Fusion Engineering and Design, 88(9-10), p.1916 - 1919, 2013/10

 Times Cited Count:2 Percentile:76.01(Nuclear Science & Technology)

This presentation focuses on the welding technology R&D between the JT-60SA vacuum vessel and the ports. The vacuum vessel is designed to allow port bore penetration to access the vessel inside for plasma diagnostics, and so on. There are various types of 73 ports and these are categorized by their locations; the upper/lower vertical, the upper/lower oblique, and the horizontal. Ports are onsite-welded onto the VV port stub after the assembly of the VV. This assembly sequence involves the out-vessel components such as VV thermal shield and toroidal field magnets, so that these ports welding are accessed from the inside of the vessel and limited by the internal port wall. The one of the most difficult ports are the upper vertical port with corner radius of 50 mm under narrow space, and it is necessary to clarify mobility of the weld torch head. The port weldability is discussed with the mock-up trial, which consists of the partial test pieces of the product size. The TIG welding manipulator, optimized for this R&D, is prepared by its operational simulation and examined not to interfere with the internal port wall.

239 (Records 1-20 displayed on this page)