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Journal Articles

Importance of temperature control in surrounding environment during permeability test for measuring hydraulic constants of rock

Kato, Masaji*; Nara, Yoshitaka*; Fukuda, Daisuke*; Kono, Masanori*; Sato, Toshinori; Sato, Tsutomu*; Takahashi, Manabu*

Zairyo, 65(7), p.489 - 495, 2016/07

Rock masses serve a vital function as natural barriers for geological disposal of radioactive waste; therefore, information on rock permeability is essential. Highly accurate measurement of permeability requires understanding of how temperature changes in the surrounding environment influence measurement results. We performed permeability measurement under conditions with dramatic changes of temperature in the surrounding environment to investigate the influence of such changes on the experimental results. Measurement of permeability with no temperature change was also conducted as reference. All measurements were conducted using the transient pulse method, and the sample material used was Toki granite obtained from Gifu Prefecture in central Japan. We found that temperature changes in the surrounding environment remarkably affected the pressure in reservoirs upstream and downstream, the pressure difference between them, and the confining pressure; all increased when temperature increased for our experimental system. Notably, pressure difference was affected immediately. This difference directly relates to estimation of permeability.

JAEA Reports

Water permeability test of rock specimen with natural fractures using high viscosity liquid

*;

JNC-TN8430 2001-006, 72 Pages, 2001/10

JNC-TN8430-2001-006.pdf:1.71MB

We had been conducted to study hydraulic permeability along fracture intersection by NETBLOCK system using natural rock specimen. Since the permeability of this rock specimen fracture is high, it was suggest that turbulent flow might be occurred in available range of measurement system. In case of turbulent flow, estimated permeability and fracture aperture from test data tend to be low. Therefore we should achieve laminar flow. This study was used the high viscosity liquid instead of water, and test conditions which could attain laminar flow with the rock specimen was examined. The rock specimen is granite rock, has natural Y-type fractures intersection. A solution of Methyl-cellulose is used as high viscosity liquid. Due to the high viscosity liquid, hydraulic head could be measured in the wide range, and high viscosity liquid improved the accuracy of measurement. Laminar flow could be achieved in the rock specimen by the high viscosity liquid over 0.1wt%.

JAEA Reports

Sampling of rock block for water flow calibration on LABROCK

Uchida, Masahiro;

JNC-TN8410 2001-016, 36 Pages, 2001/05

JNC-TN8410-2001-016.pdf:1.53MB

This technical report summarizes sampling of the natural rock including conductive fracture. Hydraulic test was conducted at the target fracture prior to excavation. Objective of the sample was to reproduce same transmissivity at LABROCK by adjusting normal stress. This report was originally compiled by PNC in october, 1993.

JAEA Reports

Excavation and preparation rock block sample for LABROCK

Uchida, Masahiro;

JNC-TN8410 2001-015, 35 Pages, 2001/05

JNC-TN8410-2001-015.pdf:1.73MB

This technical report summarizes excavation and preparation of the natural rock block sample used in LABROCK. This report was originally compiled by PNC in March, 1993.

JAEA Reports

Examination of hydraulic property of natural rock specimen

*; *;

JNC-TN8430 2001-003, 64 Pages, 2001/03

JNC-TN8430-2001-003.pdf:2.15MB

Handling methods and test conditions of hydraulic tests for NETBLOCK system had been examined by using acrylic and/or artificial rock specimen. A natural rock specimen (granite : excavated from Kamaishi mine) with fracture intersection was formed into practicable size for NETBLOCK system. Recently, we conducted a series of hydraulic test, in order to study the influence of fracture intersection by using the natural rock specimen. Hydraulic tests were conducted under several centimeters of head, which could be controlled by improved system because hydraulic permeability of target fractures were high. As a result, 10$$^{-4}$$$$sim$$10$$^{-5}$$(m$$^{2}$$/s) orders of hydraulic transmissivity of target fractures could be measured. A low permeability in the NW direction at the lower fracture was estimated from the heterogeneous head distribution. However, it is also expected that turbulence flow might be occurred under this study condition because fracture permeability is high and flow rate through the fracture is relatively high. In case of turbulence-flow, an estimated hydraulic transmissivity is low. High-viscosity fluid hydraulic test to achieve laminar flow will be needed for correcting an evaluated transmissivity.

JAEA Reports

Coupled Thermo-Hydro-Mechanical Experiment at Kamaishi Mine Technical Note 15-99-02, Experimental results

Chijimatsu, Masakazu*; Sugita, Yutaka; Fujita, Tomoo; Amemiya, Kiyoshi*

JNC-TN8400 99-034, 177 Pages, 1999/07

JNC-TN8400-99-034.pdf:19.38MB

It is an important part of the near field perfformance assessment of nuclear waste disposal to evaluate coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (T-H-M) phenomena, e.g., thermal effects on groundwater flow through rock matrix and water seepage into the buffer material, the generation of swelling pressure of the buffer material, and thermal stresses potentially affecting porosity and fracture apertures of the rock. An in-situ T-H-M experiment named 'Engineered Barrier Experiment' has been conducted at the Kamaishi Mine, of which host rock is granodiorite, in order to establish conceptual models of the coupled T-H-M processes and to build confidence in mathematical models and computer codes. In 1995, fourteen boreholes were excavated in order to install the various sensors. After the hydraulic tests, mechanical tests were carried out to obtain the rock properties. After that, a test pit, 1.7m in diameter and 5.0m in depth, was excavated. During the excavation, the change of pore pressure, displacement and temperature of rock mass were measured. In 1996, the buffer material and heater were set up in the test pit, and then coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical test was started. The duration of heating phase was 250 days and that of cooling phase was 180 days. The heater surface was controlled to be 100$$^{circ}$$C during heating phase. Measurment, was carried out by a number pf sensors installed in both buffer and rock mass during the test. The field experiment leads to a better understanding of the behavior of the coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical phenomena in the near field.

JAEA Reports

None

*

PNC-TJ7308 98-004, 53 Pages, 1998/03

PNC-TJ7308-98-004.pdf:3.76MB

None

JAEA Reports

None

Shimo, Michito*; Yamamoto, Hajime*; *; Doe, T.*

PNC-TJ1205 98-001, 255 Pages, 1998/03

PNC-TJ1205-98-001.pdf:8.45MB

None

JAEA Reports

None

*; Shingu, Kazuki*; Takahashi, Eiichiro*; Nakajima, Toshihide*; Yamashita, Mitsugu*; *; *

PNC-TJ7187 97-002, 586 Pages, 1997/11

PNC-TJ7187-97-002.pdf:47.21MB

None

JAEA Reports

None

*; *; *; Odagawa, Shinya*

PNC-TJ7361 97-006, 121 Pages, 1997/08

PNC-TJ7361-97-006.pdf:5.33MB

None

JAEA Reports

None

*

PNC-TJ7439 97-002, 55 Pages, 1997/03

PNC-TJ7439-97-002.pdf:2.08MB

None

JAEA Reports

None

Shimo, Michito*; Yamamoto, Hajime*; *; *; Doe, T.*

PNC-TJ1205 97-001, 297 Pages, 1997/03

PNC-TJ1205-97-001.pdf:10.02MB

None

JAEA Reports

None

*; *; *

PNC-TJ7586 96-003, 240 Pages, 1997/02

PNC-TJ7586-96-003.pdf:12.14MB

no abstracts in English

JAEA Reports

None

*; *; *; *; *

PNC-TJ7361 97-003, 188 Pages, 1997/02

PNC-TJ7361-97-003.pdf:5.26MB

no abstracts in English

JAEA Reports

None

Hibiya, Keisuke*; *; Shiogama, Yukihiro*; Fukazawa, E.*; Taira, K.*; Yamamoto, M.*; Okutsu, Kazuo*

PNC-TJ1100 97-004, 60 Pages, 1997/02

PNC-TJ1100-97-004.pdf:1.58MB

None

JAEA Reports

None

Hibiya, Keisuke*; *; Shiogama, Yukihiro*; Masumoto, Kazuhiko*; Fukazawa, E.*; Taira, K.*; Yamamoto, M.*

PNC-TJ1100 97-003, 120 Pages, 1997/02

PNC-TJ1100-97-003.pdf:5.1MB

None

JAEA Reports

None

*; *; *

PNC-TJ7439 96-005, 83 Pages, 1996/12

PNC-TJ7439-96-005.pdf:1.52MB

no abstracts in English

JAEA Reports

None

*

PNC-TJ7439 96-001, 25 Pages, 1996/03

PNC-TJ7439-96-001.pdf:1.51MB

no abstracts in English

JAEA Reports

None

Shimo, Michito*; Yamamoto, Hajime*; *; Negi, Tateyuki*; Doe, T.*

PNC-TJ1205 96-003, 340 Pages, 1996/03

PNC-TJ1205-96-003.pdf:8.4MB

None

JAEA Reports

None

PNC-TJ1100 96-004, 46 Pages, 1996/02

PNC-TJ1100-96-004.pdf:1.15MB

None

36 (Records 1-20 displayed on this page)